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Re: [ICG-D] Lunacon

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  • elektra
    It s not helping that the website (where people are now looking for their info!) isn t getting programming info up to tempt people into coming. Too, I wonder
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 3, 2013
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      It's not helping that the website (where people are now looking for
      their info!) isn't getting programming info up to tempt people into coming.

      Too, I wonder if this year's snafu will hurt next year's numbers . . .
      for those who weren't there, the programming grid didn't appear until
      late Friday, and wasn't really available until Saturday. So, even if
      program participants knew they had a panel on Friday, no one knew about
      and no one came. That may hurt the con with both program participants
      and attendees. I hope not.

      Elektra
      (who has a history of attending Lunacon and wants to see it return to glory)

      On 9/3/2013 6:02 PM, Lay, Toni (DDC) wrote:
      > I have a question to ask.
      >
      > Why is Lunacon Dying? Or, is it just me who thinks this is happening?
      >
      > It seems to me like there are fewer and fewer people attending each year. The Art Show appears to be smaller each year. Why is this happening? Are people becoming bored? Has the economy put the breaks on con-going? Lunacon used to draw 1,500 or more, now attendance looks to be under 700 people. I don't think it's the programming because they seem to cover everyone: gamers, costumers, filkers, media, steampunk and cosplay. So what is the problem, if there is one.
      >
      > I'd hate to see Lunacon disappear because it's a local con and easy to get to, and I don't drive. Everything else I attend requires a plane or Amtrak to get there. Maybe it's because fans are older and retired, and don't have the funds to do cons any longer. I realize when I retire I'll have to cut back on my con-going. But Lunacon should be able to bring in new fans.
      >
      > So, I ask again, why is Lunacon dying?
      >
      > Lack of funds in general?
      > Hotel is too expensive? (parking is free)
      > Hotel food is too expensive?
      > Programming is boring?
      > Friends stopped going so I stopped going.
      >
      >
      > Toni
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

      --

      Coab minshak'a.

      Until Midnight Editorial Services
      http://www.untilmidnight.com

      Editor and Reviewer for buzzymag
      http://buzzymag.com

      Acquisitions Editor for Sparkito Press, an Imprint of Dark Quest Books
      http://www.darkquestbooks.com

      https://twitter.com/elektraUM [Twitter]
      https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000514628819 [Facebook]

      SFWA Affiliate member

      Publicity for Darkovercon
      http://www.darkovercon.org

      BlueBlaze Maine Coons
      http://www.blueblaze.com
    • ratgirl_6
      I do wonder at the fate of these smaller cons. I think the guest list is an issue. Media cons do draw larger crowds, but I know in Baltimore Farpoint usually
      Message 2 of 12 , Sep 4, 2013
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        I do wonder at the fate of these smaller cons. I think the guest list is an issue. Media cons do draw larger crowds, but I know in Baltimore Farpoint usually has pretty good guests, and that is a smaller con. I think good programming PLUS good guests is key. Especially for the youngsters, you must have a solid anime and gaming track. Not board games...video games. Incorporate that into your con, and you will get the younger crowd in. Also, late night dances. I may not be so young anymore, but I am young at heart.  I spend lots of time talking to the "youngsters" and that's what they want. There is a lot to be said about having a mellow conversation with a great writer, I'm down for that, but young kids aren't so interested in the literary tracks.
        just my 2 cents.
        Pavlina

        --- In icg-d@yahoogroups.com, <elektra@...> wrote:

        It's not helping that the website (where people are now looking for

        their info!) isn't getting programming info up to tempt people into coming.



        Too, I wonder if this year's snafu will hurt next year's numbers . . .

        for those who weren't there, the programming grid didn't appear until

        late Friday, and wasn't really available until Saturday. So, even if

        program participants knew they had a panel on Friday, no one knew about

        and no one came. That may hurt the con with both program participants

        and attendees. I hope not.



        Elektra

        (who has a history of attending Lunacon and wants to see it return to glory)



        On 9/3/2013 6:02 PM, Lay, Toni (DDC) wrote:

        > I have a question to ask.

        >

        > Why is Lunacon Dying? Or, is it just me who thinks this is happening?

        >

        > It seems to me like there are fewer and fewer people attending each year. The Art Show appears to be smaller each year. Why is this happening? Are people becoming bored? Has the economy put the breaks on con-going? Lunacon used to draw 1,500 or more, now attendance looks to be under 700 people. I don't think it's the programming because they seem to cover everyone: gamers, costumers, filkers, media, steampunk and cosplay. So what is the problem, if there is one.

        >

        > I'd hate to see Lunacon disappear because it's a local con and easy to get to, and I don't drive. Everything else I attend requires a plane or Amtrak to get there. Maybe it's because fans are older and retired, and don't have the funds to do cons any longer. I realize when I retire I'll have to cut back on my con-going. But Lunacon should be able to bring in new fans.

        >

        > So, I ask again, why is Lunacon dying?

        >

        > Lack of funds in general?

        > Hotel is too expensive? (parking is free)

        > Hotel food is too expensive?

        > Programming is boring?

        > Friends stopped going so I stopped going.

        >

        >

        > Toni

        >

        >

        >

        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        >

        >

        >

        > ------------------------------------

        >

        > Yahoo! Groups Links

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >



        --



        Coab minshak'a.



        Until Midnight Editorial Services

        http://www.untilmidnight.com



        Editor and Reviewer for buzzymag

        http://buzzymag.com



        Acquisitions Editor for Sparkito Press, an Imprint of Dark Quest Books

        http://www.darkquestbooks.com



        https://twitter.com/elektraUM [Twitter]

        https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000514628819 [Facebook]



        SFWA Affiliate member



        Publicity for Darkovercon

        http://www.darkovercon.org



        BlueBlaze Maine Coons

        http://www.blueblaze.com
      • ma0902432
        Toni-- Just my opinion....I believe that Lunacon may be fading away for the same reasons that Philcon is. Not that it s a bad con, just that they don t have
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 4, 2013
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          Toni--

          Just my opinion....I believe that Lunacon may be fading away for the same
          reasons that Philcon is. Not that it's a bad con, just that they don''t
          have the Outreach to find new attendees the way that, say, Arisia does.
          Arisia has increased every year, despite being a con in Boston in
          January, with an almost guaranteed snow storm during the con and a
          significant risk of getting stuck in Boston for extra days. Yet they
          have almost outgrown their "newer, larger" hotel. At Arisia I certainly
          do see more younger faces every year. Andat Balticon too.

          The economy certainly has something to do with it. I know too many
          people who are barely scraping by, and as we all get older, getting by
          becomes far harder. Also, being more "out in the suburbs" as it were,
          Lunacon is harder to reach, whereas Arisia is pretty much downtown (of
          course that makes it more expensive, too).

          I personally am rather burned out on most cons and am taking a break to
          do some other things over the past year and continuing into the next.

          Yours in costuming,Lisa A






          On Tue, 3 Sep 2013 18:02:40 -0400 "Lay, Toni (DDC)" <layt@...>
          writes:
          > I have a question to ask.
          >
          > Why is Lunacon Dying? Or, is it just me who thinks this is
          > happening?
          >
          > It seems to me like there are fewer and fewer people attending each
          > year. The Art Show appears to be smaller each year. Why is this
          > happening? Are people becoming bored? Has the economy put the
          > breaks on con-going? Lunacon used to draw 1,500 or more, now
          > attendance looks to be under 700 people. I don't think it's the
          > programming because they seem to cover everyone: gamers, costumers,
          > filkers, media, steampunk and cosplay. So what is the problem, if
          > there is one.
          >
          > I'd hate to see Lunacon disappear because it's a local con and easy
          > to get to, and I don't drive. Everything else I attend requires a
          > plane or Amtrak to get there. Maybe it's because fans are older and
          > retired, and don't have the funds to do cons any longer. I realize
          > when I retire I'll have to cut back on my con-going. But Lunacon
          > should be able to bring in new fans.
          >
          > So, I ask again, why is Lunacon dying?
          >
          > Lack of funds in general?
          > Hotel is too expensive? (parking is free)
          > Hotel food is too expensive?
          > Programming is boring?
          > Friends stopped going so I stopped going.
          >
          >
          > Toni
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Aurora Celeste
          I think it s incorrect that young people don t like literary discussion. They do . . . Just about stuff they read. They want to talk about YA and books
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 4, 2013
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            I think it's incorrect that young people don't like literary discussion.  They do . . . Just about stuff they read.  They want to talk about YA and books published in the last few years, with fewer panels on stuff that's 40 years old or more.  They want to be able to have a discussion on YA without someone mentioning "you don't know YA unless you've read all of Heinlein".  They want to talk about what they love without being made to feel they're being told they're stupid for liking it.

            Extend the same to anime.  Kids like current stuff, and while they'll listen about your love of Yamato they don't want to hear how they know nothing because they haven't seen it.

            On Wednesday, September 4, 2013, wrote:
            I do wonder at the fate of these smaller cons. I think the guest list is an issue. Media cons do draw larger crowds, but I know in Baltimore Farpoint usually has pretty good guests, and that is a smaller con. I think good programming PLUS good guests is key. Especially for the youngsters, you must have a solid anime and gaming track. Not board games...video games. Incorporate that into your con, and you will get the younger crowd in. Also, late night dances. I may not be so young anymore, but I am young at heart. &nbsp;I spend lots of time talking to the &quot;youngsters&quot; and that&#39;s what they want. There is a lot to be said about having a mellow conversation with a great writer, I&#39;m down for that, but young kids aren&#39;t so interested in the literary tracks.
             just my 2 cents.
             Pavlina

            --- In icg-d@yahoogroups.com, &lt;elektra@...&gt; wrote:

             It&#39;s not helping that the website (where people are now looking for

            their info!) isn&#39;t getting programming info up to tempt people into coming.



            Too, I wonder if this year&#39;s snafu will hurt next year&#39;s numbers . . .

            for those who weren&#39;t there, the programming grid didn&#39;t appear until

            late Friday, and wasn&#39;t really available until Saturday. So, even if

            program participants knew they had a panel on Friday, no one knew about

            and no one came. That may hurt the con with both program participants

            and attendees. I hope not.



            Elektra

            (who has a history of attending Lunacon and wants to see it return to glory)



             On 9/3/2013 6:02 PM, Lay, Toni (DDC) wrote:

            &gt; I have a question to ask.

            &gt;

            &gt; Why is Lunacon Dying?  Or, is it just me who thinks this is happening?

            &gt;

            &gt; It seems to me like there are fewer and fewer people attending each year.  The Art Show appears to be smaller each year.  Why is this happening?  Are people becoming bored?  Has the economy put the breaks on con-going?  Lunacon used to draw 1,500 or more, now attendance looks to be under 700 people.  I don&#39;t think it&#39;s the programming because they seem to cover everyone: gamers, costumers, filkers, media, steampunk and cosplay.  So what is the problem, if there is one.

            &gt;

            &gt; I&#39;d hate to see Lunacon disappear because it&#39;s a local con and easy to get to, and I don&#39;t drive.  Everything else I attend requires a plane or Amtrak to get there.  Maybe it&#39;s because fans are older and retired, and don&#39;t have the funds to do cons any longer.  I realize when I retire I&#39;ll have to cut back on my con-going.  But Lunacon should be able to bring in new fans.

            &gt;

            &gt; So, I ask again, why is Lunacon dying?

            &gt;

            &gt; Lack of funds in general?

            &gt; Hotel is too expensive? (parking is free)

            &gt; Hotel food is too expensive?

            &gt; Programming is boring?

            &gt; Friends stopped going so I stopped going.

            &gt;

            &gt;

            &gt; Toni

            &gt;

            &gt;

            &gt;

            &gt; [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            &gt;

            &gt;

            &gt;

            &gt; ------------------------------------

            &gt;

            &gt; Yahoo! Groups Links

            &gt;

            &gt;

            &gt;

            &gt;

            &gt;



            --



            Coab minshak&#39;a.



            Until Midnight Editorial Services

             http://www.untilmidnight.com



            Editor and Reviewer for buzzymag

             http://buzzymag.com



            Acquisitions Editor for Sparkito Press, an Imprint of Dark Quest Books

             http://www.darkquestbooks.com



             https://twitter.com/elektraUM                             [Twitter]

             https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000514628819   [Facebook]



            SFWA Affiliate member



            Publicity for Darkovercon

             http://www.darkovercon.org



            BlueBlaze Maine Coons

             http://www.blueblaze.com


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          • Betsy Marks Delaney
            I think that Aurora s got a lock on a big part of the problem. You can offer to open up older fiction to younger generations but that doesn t mean they will
            Message 5 of 12 , Sep 4, 2013
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              I think that Aurora's got a lock on a big part of the problem. You can offer to open up older fiction to younger generations but that doesn't mean they will like it. Short attention spans and more popular fiction means less chance that they'll like what they read. If it isn't Harry Potter or Percy Jackson or Hunger Games....

              If the folks in charge of programming don't ask the younger contingent what they're interested in seeing or hearing about, then the programming will contain stuff the younger contingent isn't interested in hearing about, and they're not going to spend the money they have going to events that don't appeal to their tastes.

              Another point: if all the programming casts in the direction of a single track to the exclusion of other interests, then the folks who might be interested in doing other things don't get what they want either, and it becomes darn hard to justify the expense. 

              Membership cost is just part of the overall picture, by the way. When you lump in the cost of a membership (possibly times two, three or more in the case of a family), then add in a hotel room at $100 or more per night, plus transportation and food, and suddenly the weekend goes from affordable to the only vacation a family gets in a year. Add to that the iffy status of programming (whether there will be enough to draw the crowd you intend to attract) and it suddenly becomes impossible for first or second generation fandom to bring along the next generation.

              Take my case as an example: I think it's highly likely I won't make it to another WorldCon and increasingly likely I won't make it to any more local cons either, because by the time I factor in three memberships and the rest on top of my meager salary, it's just not possible. I want to come to Costume-Con next year, but financially and timing-wise, I don't see how I can manage it.

              I attended Balticon this year because I worked as many panels as I could manage, saw next to nothing and couldn't afford much in the dealer room. All my free money went toward food and room expenses and that was without the girls in tow. On top of that, when I looked at the movie list, there wasn't anything I wanted to see. Panels I'd have been interested in attending were up against the ones I was on, and there just weren't that many. Roaming the dealer room without available funds was akin to torture. And I'm not yet 50. A bunch of my friends are older and hitting retirement or disability fixed incomes (or both).

              If you're still single and under 30, your interests are going to be different from a fan who's pushing 50 with a family in tow. Finding a balance between the two means hard work and understanding the market, not just getting the same group of friends together year after year to go over the same material without regard to the rest of the audience.

              I work in a theatre that caters to an older generation with items that occasionally attract a younger audience. We  aren't committed to producing just for one audience but that has made it hard for us to build a consistent following because what appeals to some of our audience doesn't appeal to another part. So we get one or two-time visitors, or people who see only one or two productions a year. (It's part of why I only work part-time, but convincing the powers that be that they're doing it wrong has proved insurmountable.)

              So what do you do? I'd suggest recruiting department heads nearer to the younger generation if you want to appeal to the younger generation. Or find people who understand and are comfortable with reaching out to multiple sources for program inspiration. Without the crossover, eventually the event will die.

              My $0.02, adjusted for inflation. Your mileage may vary.

              Betsy


              On Wed, Sep 4, 2013 at 9:53 AM, Aurora Celeste <auroraceleste@...> wrote:


              I think it's incorrect that young people don't like literary discussion.  They do . . . Just about stuff they read.  They want to talk about YA and books published in the last few years, with fewer panels on stuff that's 40 years old or more.  They want to be able to have a discussion on YA without someone mentioning "you don't know YA unless you've read all of Heinlein".  They want to talk about what they love without being made to feel they're being told they're stupid for liking it.

              Extend the same to anime.  Kids like current stuff, and while they'll listen about your love of Yamato they don't want to hear how they know nothing because they haven't seen it.


              --
              --
              --
              Betsy Marks Delaney

              http://www.hawkeswood.com/
            • mscip
              At Clockwork Alchemy, we have found that doing lots of hands on workshops works very well for all ages and interests. I think that people are getting tired of
              Message 6 of 12 , Sep 4, 2013
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                At Clockwork Alchemy, we have found that doing lots of hands on workshops works very well for all ages and interests. I think that people are getting tired of "talking heads" panels and want something more active. That's why I try to provide something different - like handing around garments when doing a dyeing panel. Something that provides interest, so people do not snooze during a panel.

                Until later--

                Carole


                Sent from my iPad

                On Sep 4, 2013, at 9:19 AM, Betsy Marks Delaney <aramintamd@...> wrote:

                I think that Aurora's got a lock on a big part of the problem. You can offer to open up older fiction to younger generations but that doesn't mean they will like it. Short attention spans and more popular fiction means less chance that they'll like what they read. If it isn't Harry Potter or Percy Jackson or Hunger Games....

                If the folks in charge of programming don't ask the younger contingent what they're interested in seeing or hearing about, then the programming will contain stuff the younger contingent isn't interested in hearing about, and they're not going to spend the money they have going to events that don't appeal to their tastes.

                Another point: if all the programming casts in the direction of a single track to the exclusion of other interests, then the folks who might be interested in doing other things don't get what they want either, and it becomes darn hard to justify the expense. 

                Membership cost is just part of the overall picture, by the way. When you lump in the cost of a membership (possibly times two, three or more in the case of a family), then add in a hotel room at $100 or more per night, plus transportation and food, and suddenly the weekend goes from affordable to the only vacation a family gets in a year. Add to that the iffy status of programming (whether there will be enough to draw the crowd you intend to attract) and it suddenly becomes impossible for first or second generation fandom to bring along the next generation.

                Take my case as an example: I think it's highly likely I won't make it to another WorldCon and increasingly likely I won't make it to any more local cons either, because by the time I factor in three memberships and the rest on top of my meager salary, it's just not possible. I want to come to Costume-Con next year, but financially and timing-wise, I don't see how I can manage it.

                I attended Balticon this year because I worked as many panels as I could manage, saw next to nothing and couldn't afford much in the dealer room. All my free money went toward food and room expenses and that was without the girls in tow. On top of that, when I looked at the movie list, there wasn't anything I wanted to see. Panels I'd have been interested in attending were up against the ones I was on, and there just weren't that many. Roaming the dealer room without available funds was akin to torture. And I'm not yet 50. A bunch of my friends are older and hitting retirement or disability fixed incomes (or both).

                If you're still single and under 30, your interests are going to be different from a fan who's pushing 50 with a family in tow. Finding a balance between the two means hard work and understanding the market, not just getting the same group of friends together year after year to go over the same material without regard to the rest of the audience.

                I work in a theatre that caters to an older generation with items that occasionally attract a younger audience. We  aren't committed to producing just for one audience but that has made it hard for us to build a consistent following because what appeals to some of our audience doesn't appeal to another part. So we get one or two-time visitors, or people who see only one or two productions a year. (It's part of why I only work part-time, but convincing the powers that be that they're doing it wrong has proved insurmountable.)

                So what do you do? I'd suggest recruiting department heads nearer to the younger generation if you want to appeal to the younger generation. Or find people who understand and are comfortable with reaching out to multiple sources for program inspiration. Without the crossover, eventually the event will die.

                My $0.02, adjusted for inflation. Your mileage may vary.

                Betsy


                On Wed, Sep 4, 2013 at 9:53 AM, Aurora Celeste <auroraceleste@...> wrote:


                I think it's incorrect that young people don't like literary discussion.  They do . . . Just about stuff they read.  They want to talk about YA and books published in the last few years, with fewer panels on stuff that's 40 years old or more.  They want to be able to have a discussion on YA without someone mentioning "you don't know YA unless you've read all of Heinlein".  They want to talk about what they love without being made to feel they're being told they're stupid for liking it.

                Extend the same to anime.  Kids like current stuff, and while they'll listen about your love of Yamato they don't want to hear how they know nothing because they haven't seen it.


                --
                --
                --
                Betsy Marks Delaney

                http://www.hawkeswood.com/
              • ECM Mami
                We moved, but I still miss it. Sadly, the original leadership has faded away, along with lots of the older members, but before we moved I was beginning to
                Message 7 of 12 , Sep 4, 2013
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                  We moved, but I still miss it.  Sadly, the original leadership has faded away, along with lots of the older members, but before we moved I was beginning to feel a sameness every year.  Same programs by the same people, for one thing.  Another thing is that it's no longer a con defined by it many rowdy parties.  And one really big thing is the total lack of eateries in walking distance.  (I'm not a big fan of crossing large NJ speedways.)

                  But I still miss it, because it was damn fine weekend.

                  Elaine

                  >
                  > I have a question to ask.
                  >
                  > Why is Lunacon Dying? Or, is it just me who thinks this is happening?
                  >
                  > It seems to me like there are fewer and fewer people attending each year. The Art Show appears to be smaller each year. Why is this happening? Are people becoming bored? Has the economy put the breaks on con-going? Lunacon used to draw 1,500 or more, now attendance looks to be under 700 people. I don't think it's the programming because they seem to cover everyone: gamers, costumers, filkers, media, steampunk and cosplay. So what is the problem, if there is one.
                  >
                  > I'd hate to see Lunacon disappear because it's a local con and easy to get to, and I don't drive. Everything else I attend requires a plane or Amtrak to get there. Maybe it's because fans are older and retired, and don't have the funds to do cons any longer. I realize when I retire I'll have to cut back on my con-going. But Lunacon should be able to bring in new fans.
                  >
                  > So, I ask again, why is Lunacon dying?
                  >
                  > Lack of funds in general?
                  > Hotel is too expensive? (parking is free)
                  > Hotel food is too expensive?
                  > Programming is boring?
                  > Friends stopped going so I stopped going.
                  >
                  >
                  > Toni
                   
                • Stephanie L Bannon
                  ... That should have been If the con averages 250/year then budget for 200-225, not 500....
                  Message 8 of 12 , Sep 4, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    At 03:17 PM 9/4/2013, you wrote:
                    >At 03:41 AM 9/4/2013, you wrote:
                    > >I do wonder at the fate of these smaller cons. I think the guest
                    > >list is an issue. Media cons do draw larger crowds, but I know in
                    > >Baltimore Farpoint usually has pretty good guests, and that is a
                    > >smaller con. I think good programming PLUS good guests is key.
                    > >Especially for the youngsters, you must have a solid anime and
                    > >gaming track. Not board games...video games. Incorporate that into
                    > >your con, and you will get the younger crowd in. Also, late night
                    > >dances. I may not be so young anymore, but I am young at heart.
                    > > I spend lots of time talking to the "youngsters" and
                    > >that's what they want. There is a lot to be said about having a
                    > >mellow conversation with a great writer, I'm down for that, but
                    > >young kids aren't so interested in the literary tracks.
                    > > just my 2 cents.
                    > > Pavlina
                    >
                    >The only problem with doing all the above is that then it becomes an
                    >entirely different type of convention than the ones the organizers
                    >and regulars want to attend. Destroying a con to save it rarely
                    >works. Bigger is not automatically better. (and all those other
                    >cliches)There is a niche for the 300-500 person literary event - the
                    >trick is programming for the regulars and budgeting for a realistic
                    >number of attendees. If the con averages 150/year then budget for
                    >200-225, not 500....


                    That should have been If the con averages 250/year then budget for
                    200-225, not 500....


                    >YMMV,
                    >Stephanie
                    >
                    >
                    > >--- In icg-d@yahoogroups.com, <elektra@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > It's not helping that the website (where people are now looking for
                    > >
                    > >their info!) isn't getting programming info up to tempt people
                    > >into coming.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >Too, I wonder if this year's snafu will hurt next year's
                    > >numbers . . .
                    > >
                    > >for those who weren't there, the programming grid didn't
                    > appear until
                    > >
                    > >late Friday, and wasn't really available until Saturday. So, even if
                    > >
                    > >program participants knew they had a panel on Friday, no one knew about
                    > >
                    > >and no one came. That may hurt the con with both program participants
                    > >
                    > >and attendees. I hope not.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >Elektra
                    > >
                    > >(who has a history of attending Lunacon and wants to see it return to glory)
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > On 9/3/2013 6:02 PM, Lay, Toni (DDC) wrote:
                    > >
                    > >> I have a question to ask.
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >> Why is Lunacon Dying? Or, is it just me who thinks this is happening?
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >> It seems to me like there are fewer and fewer people attending
                    > >each year. The Art Show appears to be smaller each year. Why is
                    > >this happening? Are people becoming bored? Has the economy put the
                    > >breaks on con-going? Lunacon used to draw 1,500 or more, now
                    > >attendance looks to be under 700 people. I don't think it's
                    > >the programming because they seem to cover everyone: gamers,
                    > >costumers, filkers, media, steampunk and cosplay. So what is the
                    > >problem, if there is one.
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >> I'd hate to see Lunacon disappear because it's a local
                    > >con and easy to get to, and I don't drive. Everything else I
                    > >attend requires a plane or Amtrak to get there. Maybe it's
                    > >because fans are older and retired, and don't have the funds to
                    > >do cons any longer. I realize when I retire I'll have to cut
                    > >back on my con-going. But Lunacon should be able to bring in new fans.
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >> So, I ask again, why is Lunacon dying?
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >> Lack of funds in general?
                    > >
                    > >> Hotel is too expensive? (parking is free)
                    > >
                    > >> Hotel food is too expensive?
                    > >
                    > >> Programming is boring?
                    > >
                    > >> Friends stopped going so I stopped going.
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >> Toni
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >> ------------------------------------
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >--
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >Coab minshak'a.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >Until Midnight Editorial Services
                    > >
                    > > http://www.untilmidnight.com
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >Editor and Reviewer for buzzymag
                    > >
                    > > http://buzzymag.com
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >Acquisitions Editor for Sparkito Press, an Imprint of Dark Quest Books
                    > >
                    > > http://www.darkquestbooks.com
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > https://twitter.com/elektraUM [Twitter]
                    > >
                    > > https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000514628819 [Facebook]
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >SFWA Affiliate member
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >Publicity for Darkovercon
                    > >
                    > > http://www.darkovercon.org
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >BlueBlaze Maine Coons
                    > >
                    > > http://www.blueblaze.com
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >------------------------------------
                    > >
                    > >Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >------------------------------------
                    >
                    >Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
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