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Reflective Paint on Fabric?

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  • randwhit@aol.com
    I ve been thinking about making some more high-visibility safety vests for work so I can have good fit, natural fibers and pockets that are sized and placed
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 29, 2012
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      I've been thinking about making some more high-visibility safety vests for
      work so I can have good fit, natural fibers and pockets that are sized and
      placed just right for my tools and sample bags. My first efforts in this
      regard have been fairly successful.

      I got to thinking, why not apply the reflective medium as a paint, rather
      than iron-on strips? I know Carhardt makes T-shirts with silk-screened
      reflective stripes. I could do my company's logo as a reflective stencil.

      Has anyone on the lists tried something like this? How well do commercial
      reflective paints (the ones with the micro glass beads) apply to fabric?
      Can they be airbrushed? Is there a paint meant specifically for fabric?

      Randall

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Philip Gust
      Hi Randall, I haven t tried it myself, but Mona May, who designed the costumes for the Disney Haunted Mansion movie did exactly that. A summary of the
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 30, 2012
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        Hi Randall,

        I haven't tried it myself, but Mona May, who designed the costumes for the Disney "Haunted Mansion" movie did exactly that. A summary of the technique and a photo appears in a side bar of an article in the August 2012 "Hauntings and Horror!" issue of "The Virtual Costumer" magazine
        (http://www.siwcostumers.org/vc_contents.html#v10_i3). The article, "On Loan from the Haunted Mansion" starts on page 11.

        I can try to contact Mona if you need to know more specific information about the technique and material she used. It might make a nice article.

        There is also active interest in a technique for applying electroluminescent material as a paint. The advantage is that the effect is less dependent on lighting conditions than the reflective paint Mona used Again, I haven't tried it (yet), but check out the "Electroluminescent Coating System (TM)" that LumiLor has developed (http://www.lumilor.com). The disadvantage is that you need a battery, but you can probably run this type of thing for a couple of hours on a single 9v battery. Might be worth the trouble for the added safety, though.

        If you decide to try either of these, let me know how it works out.

        --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, randwhit@... wrote:
        >
        > I've been thinking about making some more high-visibility safety vests for
        > work so I can have good fit, natural fibers and pockets that are sized and
        > placed just right for my tools and sample bags. My first efforts in this
        > regard have been fairly successful.
        >
        > I got to thinking, why not apply the reflective medium as a paint, rather
        > than iron-on strips? I know Carhardt makes T-shirts with silk-screened
        > reflective stripes. I could do my company's logo as a reflective stencil.
        >
        > Has anyone on the lists tried something like this? How well do commercial
        > reflective paints (the ones with the micro glass beads) apply to fabric?
        > Can they be airbrushed? Is there a paint meant specifically for fabric?
        >
        > Randall
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • randwhit@aol.com
        I ll check out the article. I ve found a manufacturer s web site that sells the reflective material as a silk screen ink, but they want to sell it by the
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 30, 2012
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          I'll check out the article.

          I've found a manufacturer's web site that sells the reflective material as
          a silk screen ink, but they want to sell it by the gallon. A bit much for
          one project.

          I'm thinking now I could do the logo in plain gray fabric paint then apply
          a thin top coat of the reflective paint available in spray cans at hardware
          stores. An SWCG member showed us a butcher paper stencil technique a while
          back that should adapt well for this.

          Randall


          In a message dated 12/30/2012 6:01:41 A.M. US Mountain Standard Time,
          gust@... writes:






          Hi Randall,

          I haven't tried it myself, but Mona May, who designed the costumes for the
          Disney "Haunted Mansion" movie did exactly that. A summary of the
          technique and a photo appears in a side bar of an article in the August 2012
          "Hauntings and Horror!" issue of "The Virtual Costumer" magazine
          (_http://www.siwcostumers.org/vc_contents.html#v10_i3_
          (http://www.siwcostumers.org/vc_contents.html#v10_i3) ). The article, "On Loan from the Haunted
          Mansion" starts on page 11.

          I can try to contact Mona if you need to know more specific information
          about the technique and material she used. It might make a nice article.

          There is also active interest in a technique for applying
          electroluminescent material as a paint. The advantage is that the effect is less dependent
          on lighting conditions than the reflective paint Mona used Again, I haven't
          tried it (yet), but check out the "Electroluminescent Coating System (TM)"
          that LumiLor has developed (_http://www.lumilor.com_
          (http://www.lumilor.com/) ). The disadvantage is that you need a battery, but you can probably
          run this type of thing for a couple of hours on a single 9v battery. Might be
          worth the trouble for the added safety, though.

          If you decide to try either of these, let me know how it works out.

          --- In _ICG-D@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:ICG-D@yahoogroups.com) ,
          randwhit@... wrote:
          >
          > I've been thinking about making some more high-visibility safety vests
          for
          > work so I can have good fit, natural fibers and pockets that are sized
          and
          > placed just right for my tools and sample bags. My first efforts in this
          > regard have been fairly successful.
          >
          > I got to thinking, why not apply the reflective medium as a paint,
          rather
          > than iron-on strips? I know Carhardt makes T-shirts with silk-screened
          > reflective stripes. I could do my company's logo as a reflective stencil.
          >
          > Has anyone on the lists tried something like this? How well do
          commercial
          > reflective paints (the ones with the micro glass beads) apply to fabric?
          > Can they be airbrushed? Is there a paint meant specifically for fabric?
          >
          > Randall
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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