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Re: Removing paint

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  • Patrick
    Additional thought-- Although Methylene chloride is the least toxic of chlorinated hydrocarbons, apply it over surfaces to be paint-stripped in a
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 10, 2012
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      Additional thought--

      Although Methylene chloride is the least toxic of chlorinated hydrocarbons, apply it over surfaces to be paint-stripped in a well-ventilated area--

      Patrick
    • Nora
      Hey, Patrick: I went to a couple of big boxes today, finally getting around to this project, and no one could seem to point to a product. Do you know of
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 8, 2013
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        Hey, Patrick:

        I went to a couple of "big boxes" today, finally getting around to this project, and no one could seem to point to a product.   Do you know of one off-hand?

        Failing that, I found this list:  http://hpd.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/search?tbl=TblChemicals&queryx=75-09-2

        Any recommendations?

        Bruce

         

        --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick" wrote:
        >
        > Bruce--
        >
        > Methylene chloride (available at a number of Big Box stores) will soften paint so it can be removed from nylon. Vinyl may be OK--Polyethylene and nylon for sure. Perspex, Acrylite or Plexiglass--no. They are (polymerized) Methyl Methacrylate, A.K.A. Acrylic plastic.
        > But be sure it's really 'nylon'! Methylene chloride will dissolve acrylic plastics like Methyl Methacrylate!
        >
        > Test a drop or two to see if it softens the plastic and makes it sticky. If not--it isn't acrylic and the methylene chloride paint stripper will work ok.
        >
        > Pat O'Connor
        >
        > --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, "Nora & Bruce Mai" casamai@ wrote:
        > >
        > > Howdy:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Thought I'd throw this out on the list and see what comes out of the
        > > "collective mind".
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I have two items I'm thinking I need to remove paint from. They are nylon
        > > (I think) boots and leather (I think - maybe vinyl) ski gloves. I painted
        > > them both silver many years ago. The problem at the time was/is, it didn't
        > > stick to the nylon boots very well because the boots flex when walking in
        > > them. And for some reason, even after all these years, there are sticky
        > > spots on the gloves.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > So, what I'm thinking, is stripping the old paint off and repainting them -
        > > I don't think I primed them last time. The boots, I think, I'm going to
        > > cover them with something like Crystal Gel first, so that the paint won't
        > > flake off this time.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > What would be the best paint remover that won't ruin my surfaces?
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Bruce
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >

      • BlueCosplayAngel
        I would recommend a light sanding. Not only will it remove any imperfections in a prior paint job but it will make the areas more conducive to adherence of any
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 9, 2013
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          I would recommend a light sanding. Not only will it remove any imperfections in a prior paint job but it will make the areas more conducive to adherence of any new paint product.

          On Sep 8, 2013 4:10 PM, "Nora" <von_drago@...> wrote:
           


          Hey, Patrick:

          I went to a couple of "big boxes" today, finally getting around to this project, and no one could seem to point to a product.   Do you know of one off-hand?

          Failing that, I found this list:  http://hpd.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/search?tbl=TblChemicals&queryx=75-09-2

          Any recommendations?

          Bruce

           

          --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick" wrote:
          >
          > Bruce--
          >
          > Methylene chloride (available at a number of Big Box stores) will soften paint so it can be removed from nylon. Vinyl may be OK--Polyethylene and nylon for sure. Perspex, Acrylite or Plexiglass--no. They are (polymerized) Methyl Methacrylate, A.K.A. Acrylic plastic.
          > But be sure it's really 'nylon'! Methylene chloride will dissolve acrylic plastics like Methyl Methacrylate!
          >
          > Test a drop or two to see if it softens the plastic and makes it sticky. If not--it isn't acrylic and the methylene chloride paint stripper will work ok.
          >
          > Pat O'Connor
          >
          > --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, "Nora & Bruce Mai" casamai@ wrote:
          > >
          > > Howdy:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Thought I'd throw this out on the list and see what comes out of the
          > > "collective mind".
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > I have two items I'm thinking I need to remove paint from. They are nylon
          > > (I think) boots and leather (I think - maybe vinyl) ski gloves. I painted
          > > them both silver many years ago. The problem at the time was/is, it didn't
          > > stick to the nylon boots very well because the boots flex when walking in
          > > them. And for some reason, even after all these years, there are sticky
          > > spots on the gloves.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > So, what I'm thinking, is stripping the old paint off and repainting them -
          > > I don't think I primed them last time. The boots, I think, I'm going to
          > > cover them with something like Crystal Gel first, so that the paint won't
          > > flake off this time.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > What would be the best paint remover that won't ruin my surfaces?
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Bruce
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >

        • Nora & Bruce Mai
          Thought I d pop in, say thanks to Patrick and share a quick bit of knowledge with the list. Found an environmentally safe paint stripper called Citristrip
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 22, 2013
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            Thought I'd pop in, say thanks to Patrick and share a quick bit of knowledge with the list.

             

            Found an "environmentally safe" paint stripper called "Citristrip" which worked pretty well on my nylon surface.    It took a little time, but it all came off without damaging the boots I'm working with.   Nice thing about the stuff is it has an orange-y smell and supposedly can be used indoors (although with the usual mess stripping paint makes, I wouldn't recommend it).    It supposedly can be used on fabric, which is a plus.   Again - best to test it first.   Cost from one of the smaller, more old-style hardware stores we frequent was about $14.

             

            Less than 2 weeks to go until Archon - Ack!  

             

            Bruce

             

            From: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ICG-D@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Nora
            Sent: Sunday, September 08, 2013 3:06 PM
            To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [ICG-D] Re: Removing paint- revisting

             

            Hey, Patrick:

            I went to a couple of "big boxes" today, finally getting around to this project, and no one could seem to point to a product.   Do you know of one off-hand?

            Failing that, I found this list:  http://hpd.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/search?tbl=TblChemicals&queryx=75-09-2

            Any recommendations?

            Bruce

             

            --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, "Patrick" wrote:

            >
            > Bruce--
            >
            > Methylene chloride (available at a number of Big Box stores) will soften paint so it can be removed from nylon. Vinyl may be OK--Polyethylene and nylon for sure. Perspex, Acrylite or Plexiglass--no. They are (polymerized) Methyl Methacrylate, A.K.A. Acrylic plastic.
            > But be sure it's really 'nylon'! Methylene chloride will dissolve acrylic plastics like Methyl Methacrylate!
            >
            > Test a drop or two to see if it softens the plastic and makes it sticky. If not--it isn't acrylic and the methylene chloride paint stripper will work ok.
            >
            > Pat O'Connor
            >

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