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Re: [ICG-D] Historical Masquerade Judging Question

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  • lisa58@juno.com
    I always thought that using an image from your time period was eminently useful. For me, that happens to using a vintage photo to do Victorian dress--because
    Message 1 of 37 , May 31, 2012
      I always thought that using an image from your time period was eminently
      useful. For me, that happens to using a vintage photo to do Victorian
      dress--because of htenature of different photo process of the time, it is
      not always possible to know the actual color of the dresses that were
      photographed, but in a painting, color is obvious. Of course, with any
      single image, whether photo, painting, medieval tapestry or ancient
      reliefs, or even in FSF costuming--comics or book covers, you rarely or
      never get a full 360 degree view of the outfit, but have to extrapolate.
      That's part of the challenge of costuming.

      Yours in cosutmign,Lisa A


      On Thu, 31 May 2012 17:47:04 -0400 Byron Connell
      <byronpconnell@...> writes:
      > I agree. Would an attempt to create a costume based on
      > Gainsborough's "Blue Boy" be disqualified from historical dress,
      > since the suit does not exist?
      >
      > Byron
      >
      >
      > On May 31, 2012, at 10:43 AM, VWarren360@... wrote:
      >
      > >
      > > Um, I thought that the rule/guideline were to use CC30 as an
      > example:
      > > historical dress/recreation- basically wouldn't turn heads if seen
      > on the street in that time period. It does not have to be a copy of
      > an extant garment.
      > > historical interpretation- starting with period clothing with an
      > intentional deviation ex. my fallout from the 50's outfit at CC29.
      > accurate as far as pattern and materials but purposely deviating in
      > color and applique and accessories ( oh yeah and hair color but not
      > style).
      > > So starting with a commercial pattern to get the basic pattern
      > pieces for a period garmant shouldn't affect your entry category. As
      > some other folks stated - you still have to get it right (that's
      > what the reseasrch is for).
      > >
      > > There are a few folks that have done 20th century entries where
      > they have used the actual patterns from the period, no that's really
      > period accurate....
      > >
      > > Vicki
      > >
      > > -----Original Message-----
      > > From: Betsy Marks Delaney <aramintamd@...>
      > > To: ICG-D <ICG-D@yahoogroups.com>
      > > Sent: Wed, May 30, 2012 8:53 pm
      > > Subject: Re: [ICG-D] Historical Masquerade Judging Question
      > >
      > > I'm certainly no purist, but even if the pattern is historically
      > accurate,
      > > it's still an interpretation because you're not making a
      > reproduction of an
      > > existing garment. I have a period 1940s dress/suit that I intended
      > to make
      > > for Des Moines (before life went sideways), and I'd still have
      > entered it
      > > in interpretation because the garment I was going to make didn't
      > exist to
      > > be copied.
      > >
      > > Now if you can certify that an existing garment was built based on
      > that
      > > particular commercial pattern, that's another thing entirely, but I
      > would
      > > guess that this is exceedingly rare.
      > >
      > > My own personal $0.02, adjusted for inflation. Your mileage may
      > vary.
      > > Taxes, tags and license extra...
      > >
      > > Betsy
      > >
      > > On Wed, May 30, 2012 at 8:35 PM, Nora wrote:
      > >
      > > > Is there anything inherently wrong in using an historically
      > accurate
      > > > commercial pattern to construct a garment to enter into an
      > historical
      > > > masquerade?
      > > >
      > > [snip]
      > >
      > > >
      > > > What's the general feel about this? Discuss.
      > > >
      > > > Nora
      > > >
      > > > --
      > > --
      > > Betsy Marks Delaney
      > >
      > > http://www.hawkeswood.com/
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Nora
      I like this concept! Real vs. Faux would be very interesting. I d definitely make time in my schedule to see both. Nora
      Message 37 of 37 , Jun 11, 2012
        I like this concept! Real vs. Faux would be very interesting.
        I'd definitely make time in my schedule to see both.

        Nora

        --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, Barb Schofield <wilberforcebarb@...> wrote:
        >
        > We did a panel about 15 years ago on costumes for Queen Elizabeth I.  It was in two parts.  The first hour showed film clips from the various films from the 1930's to present day BBC productions, and how the costumes evolved to reflect the styles of the year when they were filmed.  The second hour was on recreating Elizabethan costumes.  Both very popular panels.
        >  
        > We used the same 2 hour format in the last few of years to show pirate, Robin Hood and vampire costumes.
        >  
        > I like using visual presentations as much as possible, as costuming is a visual medium. 
        >  
        > Barb 
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