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Re: Scanning Slides

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  • Coralin
    FWIW, my office just picked up a new client, iMemories (http://imemories.com/photos-to-digital/), who also converts video to digital. I don t know anything
    Message 1 of 26 , Jan 5, 2010
      FWIW, my office just picked up a new client, iMemories (http://imemories.com/photos-to-digital/), who also converts video to digital. I don't know anything about costs, and I doubt the working relationship would save the ICG any money, but they might also be worth considering, if Nora's quest for a slide scanner doesn't pan out.

      -Elaine

      --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, randwhit@... wrote:
      >
      > I've been asked to get my parents' 50-year old wedding slides scanned.
      >
      > My employer has a slide scanner which I may be borrowing for that purpose.
      > I'll only have the machine for a few hours, but I can let you know how well
      > it does or does not work.
      >
      > On a related note, one of the adjoining properties to a site I visited for
      > work this week is "DigMyPics.com," a professional slide and film scanning
      > service in Gilbert, Arizona.
      >
      > Randall
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 12/18/2009 9:50:20 A.M. US Mountain Standard Time,
      > von_drago@... writes:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Strange question:
      > How many of you have slides in your possession?
      > And how many would ultimately want to have those images in a digital
      > format to make them more accessible?
      >
      > Let me know - think of it as a poll.
      >
      > Nora
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Catherine
      Slides, boy do I have slides!! I have 2 stacks of loaded kodak carosels 5 feet high in one room and I m sure there are more still in the basement. Problem of
      Message 2 of 26 , Jan 5, 2010
        Slides, boy do I have slides!! I have 2 stacks of loaded kodak carosels 5 feet high in one room and I'm sure there are more still in the basement.

        Problem of being in a family that travelled a lot and with 2 people with what my mum coined as itchy trigger fingers. I remember one 3 week trip, between Dad and I, we used 36 rolls of slide film [and they were all 36 exposure rolls].

        I have seen small scanners that you can use and a relative recently bought one - must get a report.

        I just need the time to go through the stacks and weed them a bit.


        Cathy Leeson
      • joe_aspler
        I m a fan of my Epson scanner (HP and Canon make equivalent ones as well). Your $200 (or less) scanner will do very well for most household purposes. Your $600
        Message 3 of 26 , Jan 7, 2010
          I'm a fan of my Epson scanner (HP and Canon make equivalent ones as well). Your $200 (or less) scanner will do very well for most household purposes. Your $600 (or less) scanner will do even better. The quality difference wouldn't be evident to the person making casual snapshot sized reproductions. They will, however, be evident to someone making giant blowups or who likes to crop very fine detail.

          Today's scanners typically have holders that allow you to scan 8 - 12 slides at a time or up to 24 negatives.

          Don't forget that these scanners also act as standard flatbed document/photographic print scanners.

          In general, if the original negative or slide is in good condition (and that is a big "if" sometimes), the image quality is better if you scan the original rather than a print.

          Joe Aspler

          --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, "Catherine" <dragonleeson@...> wrote:
          >
          > Slides, boy do I have slides!! I have 2 stacks of loaded kodak carosels 5 feet high in one room and I'm sure there are more still in the basement.
          >
          > Problem of being in a family that travelled a lot and with 2 people with what my mum coined as itchy trigger fingers. I remember one 3 week trip, between Dad and I, we used 36 rolls of slide film [and they were all 36 exposure rolls].
          >
          > I have seen small scanners that you can use and a relative recently bought one - must get a report.
          >
          > I just need the time to go through the stacks and weed them a bit.
          >
          >
          > Cathy Leeson
          >
        • Barb Schofield
          I read some of the comments on scanning slides but don t really understand the technical stuff.  I just got an enquiry about slide scanners that would work
          Message 4 of 26 , Feb 12, 2010
            I read some of the comments on scanning slides but don't really understand the technical stuff.  I just got an enquiry about slide scanners that would work with a MAC computer.  Can anyone give me any recommendations.
             
            Barb

            --- On Fri, 12/18/09, joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@...> wrote:


            From: joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@...>
            Subject: [ICG-D] Re: Scanning Slides
            To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com
            Received: Friday, December 18, 2009, 6:40 PM


             



            I have many hundreds of scanned slides and negatives from my days attending cons. Some may remember me from the 1980s, before mortgage & family tied me down. I took pictures at a bunch of Worldcons, a couple of Costumecons (1987 and 1989) and a bunch of regional cons. Now I only attend the annual Montreal regional con, so this year's Worldcon was my first in 21 years.

            Pierre and Sandy: I tried to contact you after Worldcon this year about circulating or otherwise uploading my set of scanned images, but my emails kept bouncing back.

            Originally, dedicated negative/slide scanners were specialized, expensive items. Now, many desktop scanners have film scanning accessories. The quality of home scanners had greatly improved over the last few years, and the price has come way down. I bought a new home scanner about six months ago, and I'm truly astonished at some of its features, particularly its ability to correct badly degraded Kodacolour negatives from the 1960s and 1970s. Kodacolour is a notoriously non-archival film stock, as opposed to Kodachrome (extremely archival) and Ektachrome (respectably archival)

            I have an Epson V700 scanner ($600 at epson.com, and I'm sure much cheaper at any discount electronics store). There is also (for example) the Epson V500 scanner ($180 at epson.com).

            I've scanned many thousands of slides and negatives, starting with those from when I was a very young photographer indeed.

            I normally scan at 3200 dots per inch. That's equivalent to about a 10 Megapixel digital camera image. However, be warned: in scanners, just as in digital cameras, a high dots per inch doesn't mean much if you have poor quality optics. In my shopping around, both Epson scanners mentioned here could do 3200 dots per inch. The image quality from the cheaper one would do for most home and Powerpoint show purposes. However, when you go to extreme blowups, the quality of the optics of the more expensive scanner really shows through.

            The preceeding concerns my equipment of choice (Epson), but the equivalent statments could also be made about others, especially Canon and HP.

            Joe Aspler

            --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups. com, "Nora" <von_drago@. ..> wrote:
            >
            > Well, I'm going to look at the scanner tonight & if it suits then I might have a small side business - I'll let everyone know.
            >
            > Thanks for the answers!
            >
            > Nora
            >
            > --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups. com, "Genie" <sewgenie@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > Add me to the list. My mother has some slides taken on vacation that should be digitized. Not sure how many.
            > >
            > > --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups. com, "Nora" <von_drago@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Strange question:
            > > > How many of you have slides in your possession?
            > > > And how many would ultimately want to have those images in a digital format to make them more accessible?
            > > >
            > > > Let me know - think of it as a poll.
            > > >
            > > > Nora
            > > >
            > >
            >









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          • joe_aspler
            Hi, Barb Any scanner would have the appropriate installation software for both PC and Mac. I bought mine through futureshop.ca. You can also buy the same
            Message 5 of 26 , Feb 12, 2010
              Hi, Barb

              Any scanner would have the appropriate installation software for both PC and Mac.

              I bought mine through futureshop.ca. You can also buy the same scanner (and many others) through henrys.ca, and probably at the main Henry's store in downtown Toronto.

              Other than that, it is (as always) a question of cost vs. quality. A $200 scanner will do well enough for web sites and snapshot size pictures. For large blowups (or severe cropping), you would need a more expensive one. The two Epson scanners that I mentioned below (high/low price) are available at both henrys.ca and futureshop.ca

              Let me know if I can provide more detailed information.

              Joe

              --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, Barb Schofield <wilberforcebarb@...> wrote:
              >
              > I read some of the comments on scanning slides but don't really understand the technical stuff.  I just got an enquiry about slide scanners that would work with a MAC computer.  Can anyone give me any recommendations.
              >  
              > Barb
              >
              > --- On Fri, 12/18/09, joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > From: joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@...>
              > Subject: [ICG-D] Re: Scanning Slides
              > To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com
              > Received: Friday, December 18, 2009, 6:40 PM
              >
              >
              >  
              >
              >
              >
              > I have many hundreds of scanned slides and negatives from my days attending cons. Some may remember me from the 1980s, before mortgage & family tied me down. I took pictures at a bunch of Worldcons, a couple of Costumecons (1987 and 1989) and a bunch of regional cons. Now I only attend the annual Montreal regional con, so this year's Worldcon was my first in 21 years.
              >
              > Pierre and Sandy: I tried to contact you after Worldcon this year about circulating or otherwise uploading my set of scanned images, but my emails kept bouncing back.
              >
              > Originally, dedicated negative/slide scanners were specialized, expensive items. Now, many desktop scanners have film scanning accessories. The quality of home scanners had greatly improved over the last few years, and the price has come way down. I bought a new home scanner about six months ago, and I'm truly astonished at some of its features, particularly its ability to correct badly degraded Kodacolour negatives from the 1960s and 1970s. Kodacolour is a notoriously non-archival film stock, as opposed to Kodachrome (extremely archival) and Ektachrome (respectably archival)
              >
              > I have an Epson V700 scanner ($600 at epson.com, and I'm sure much cheaper at any discount electronics store). There is also (for example) the Epson V500 scanner ($180 at epson.com).
              >
              > I've scanned many thousands of slides and negatives, starting with those from when I was a very young photographer indeed.
              >
              > I normally scan at 3200 dots per inch. That's equivalent to about a 10 Megapixel digital camera image. However, be warned: in scanners, just as in digital cameras, a high dots per inch doesn't mean much if you have poor quality optics. In my shopping around, both Epson scanners mentioned here could do 3200 dots per inch. The image quality from the cheaper one would do for most home and Powerpoint show purposes. However, when you go to extreme blowups, the quality of the optics of the more expensive scanner really shows through.
              >
              > The preceeding concerns my equipment of choice (Epson), but the equivalent statments could also be made about others, especially Canon and HP.
              >
              > Joe Aspler
              >
            • Barb Schofield
              Hi Joe;   Thank you so much, and I will pass this information on to the costumer who wanted to know.  If we need any more help we will contact you directly.
              Message 6 of 26 , Feb 12, 2010
                Hi Joe;
                 
                Thank you so much, and I will pass this information on to the costumer who wanted to know.  If we need any more help we will contact you directly.
                 
                Barb

                --- On Fri, 2/12/10, joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@...> wrote:


                From: joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@...>
                Subject: [ICG-D] Re: Scanning Slides
                To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com
                Received: Friday, February 12, 2010, 11:56 PM


                 



                Hi, Barb

                Any scanner would have the appropriate installation software for both PC and Mac.

                I bought mine through futureshop.ca. You can also buy the same scanner (and many others) through henrys.ca, and probably at the main Henry's store in downtown Toronto.

                Other than that, it is (as always) a question of cost vs. quality. A $200 scanner will do well enough for web sites and snapshot size pictures. For large blowups (or severe cropping), you would need a more expensive one. The two Epson scanners that I mentioned below (high/low price) are available at both henrys.ca and futureshop.ca

                Let me know if I can provide more detailed information.

                Joe

                --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups. com, Barb Schofield <wilberforcebarb@ ...> wrote:
                >
                > I read some of the comments on scanning slides but don't really understand the technical stuff.  I just got an enquiry about slide scanners that would work with a MAC computer.  Can anyone give me any recommendations.
                >  
                > Barb
                >
                > --- On Fri, 12/18/09, joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@ ...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > From: joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@ ...>
                > Subject: [ICG-D] Re: Scanning Slides
                > To: ICG-D@yahoogroups. com
                > Received: Friday, December 18, 2009, 6:40 PM
                >
                >
                >  
                >
                >
                >
                > I have many hundreds of scanned slides and negatives from my days attending cons. Some may remember me from the 1980s, before mortgage & family tied me down. I took pictures at a bunch of Worldcons, a couple of Costumecons (1987 and 1989) and a bunch of regional cons. Now I only attend the annual Montreal regional con, so this year's Worldcon was my first in 21 years.
                >
                > Pierre and Sandy: I tried to contact you after Worldcon this year about circulating or otherwise uploading my set of scanned images, but my emails kept bouncing back.
                >
                > Originally, dedicated negative/slide scanners were specialized, expensive items. Now, many desktop scanners have film scanning accessories. The quality of home scanners had greatly improved over the last few years, and the price has come way down. I bought a new home scanner about six months ago, and I'm truly astonished at some of its features, particularly its ability to correct badly degraded Kodacolour negatives from the 1960s and 1970s. Kodacolour is a notoriously non-archival film stock, as opposed to Kodachrome (extremely archival) and Ektachrome (respectably archival)
                >
                > I have an Epson V700 scanner ($600 at epson.com, and I'm sure much cheaper at any discount electronics store). There is also (for example) the Epson V500 scanner ($180 at epson.com).
                >
                > I've scanned many thousands of slides and negatives, starting with those from when I was a very young photographer indeed.
                >
                > I normally scan at 3200 dots per inch. That's equivalent to about a 10 Megapixel digital camera image. However, be warned: in scanners, just as in digital cameras, a high dots per inch doesn't mean much if you have poor quality optics. In my shopping around, both Epson scanners mentioned here could do 3200 dots per inch. The image quality from the cheaper one would do for most home and Powerpoint show purposes. However, when you go to extreme blowups, the quality of the optics of the more expensive scanner really shows through.
                >
                > The preceeding concerns my equipment of choice (Epson), but the equivalent statments could also be made about others, especially Canon and HP.
                >
                > Joe Aspler
                >









                __________________________________________________________________
                Make your browsing faster, safer, and easier with the new Internet Explorer® 8. Optimized for Yahoo! Get it Now for Free! at http://downloads.yahoo.com/ca/internetexplorer/

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Nora
                I ve been meaning to post about the scanner I finally got back in Decembe, seems like a good time. It s a Nikon Coolscan 4000 (not the newest model) that I
                Message 7 of 26 , Feb 12, 2010
                  I've been meaning to post about the scanner I finally got back in Decembe, seems like a good time.

                  It's a Nikon Coolscan 4000 (not the newest model) that I bought used.
                  It's specific for slides & negatives not just a flatbed scanner with an adapter or special slot. The Nikon models have software for either Mac or PC, are the type generally used in professional labs & it works a treat.

                  Downside? They're not cheap so you have to balance the volume of slides you need to scan versus the cost. The labs will generally charge around $1 USD per slide; the scanner start at well over $1,000 USD when new. If you can get a used one (like mine) you can sometimes halve that cost.

                  Personally I'll be looking for some comission jobs on people's slides to try & defray the cost. But even with just my family slides & ones we anticipate getting for the ICG Archives (we've already used it for some ofr that) it'll still be worth it.

                  Nora

                  --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, Barb Schofield <wilberforcebarb@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Joe;
                  >  
                  > Thank you so much, and I will pass this information on to the costumer who wanted to know.  If we need any more help we will contact you directly.
                  >  
                  > Barb
                  >
                  > --- On Fri, 2/12/10, joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > From: joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@...>
                  > Subject: [ICG-D] Re: Scanning Slides
                  > To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com
                  > Received: Friday, February 12, 2010, 11:56 PM
                  >
                  >
                  >  
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi, Barb
                  >
                  > Any scanner would have the appropriate installation software for both PC and Mac.
                  >
                  > I bought mine through futureshop.ca. You can also buy the same scanner (and many others) through henrys.ca, and probably at the main Henry's store in downtown Toronto.
                  >
                  > Other than that, it is (as always) a question of cost vs. quality. A $200 scanner will do well enough for web sites and snapshot size pictures. For large blowups (or severe cropping), you would need a more expensive one. The two Epson scanners that I mentioned below (high/low price) are available at both henrys.ca and futureshop.ca
                  >
                  > Let me know if I can provide more detailed information.
                  >
                  > Joe
                  >
                  > --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups. com, Barb Schofield <wilberforcebarb@ ...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I read some of the comments on scanning slides but don't really understand the technical stuff.  I just got an enquiry about slide scanners that would work with a MAC computer.  Can anyone give me any recommendations.
                  > >  
                  > > Barb
                  > >
                  > > --- On Fri, 12/18/09, joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@ ...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > From: joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@ ...>
                  > > Subject: [ICG-D] Re: Scanning Slides
                  > > To: ICG-D@yahoogroups. com
                  > > Received: Friday, December 18, 2009, 6:40 PM
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >  
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > I have many hundreds of scanned slides and negatives from my days attending cons. Some may remember me from the 1980s, before mortgage & family tied me down. I took pictures at a bunch of Worldcons, a couple of Costumecons (1987 and 1989) and a bunch of regional cons. Now I only attend the annual Montreal regional con, so this year's Worldcon was my first in 21 years.
                  > >
                  > > Pierre and Sandy: I tried to contact you after Worldcon this year about circulating or otherwise uploading my set of scanned images, but my emails kept bouncing back.
                  > >
                  > > Originally, dedicated negative/slide scanners were specialized, expensive items. Now, many desktop scanners have film scanning accessories. The quality of home scanners had greatly improved over the last few years, and the price has come way down. I bought a new home scanner about six months ago, and I'm truly astonished at some of its features, particularly its ability to correct badly degraded Kodacolour negatives from the 1960s and 1970s. Kodacolour is a notoriously non-archival film stock, as opposed to Kodachrome (extremely archival) and Ektachrome (respectably archival)
                  > >
                  > > I have an Epson V700 scanner ($600 at epson.com, and I'm sure much cheaper at any discount electronics store). There is also (for example) the Epson V500 scanner ($180 at epson.com).
                  > >
                  > > I've scanned many thousands of slides and negatives, starting with those from when I was a very young photographer indeed.
                  > >
                  > > I normally scan at 3200 dots per inch. That's equivalent to about a 10 Megapixel digital camera image. However, be warned: in scanners, just as in digital cameras, a high dots per inch doesn't mean much if you have poor quality optics. In my shopping around, both Epson scanners mentioned here could do 3200 dots per inch. The image quality from the cheaper one would do for most home and Powerpoint show purposes. However, when you go to extreme blowups, the quality of the optics of the more expensive scanner really shows through.
                  > >
                  > > The preceeding concerns my equipment of choice (Epson), but the equivalent statments could also be made about others, especially Canon and HP.
                  > >
                  > > Joe Aspler
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > __________________________________________________________________
                  > Make your browsing faster, safer, and easier with the new Internet Explorer® 8. Optimized for Yahoo! Get it Now for Free! at http://downloads.yahoo.com/ca/internetexplorer/
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • joe_aspler
                  Nora: Your Nikon dedicated film/slide scanner is an excellent piece of equipment. As recently as five years ago, I would have said that dedicated scanners like
                  Message 8 of 26 , Feb 13, 2010
                    Nora:

                    Your Nikon dedicated film/slide scanner is an excellent piece of equipment. As recently as five years ago, I would have said that dedicated scanners like the Nikon were the only way to go. Back in those dark ages, the film/slide attachments for household flatbed document scanners gave very poor quality scans.

                    However, that has changed, and I would say that many flatbed scanners can compete with the dedicated scanners, for anything other than top of the line quality/volume needs. Hence, you can still get a good deal on a desktop scanner that will handle household document and film/slide needs, from a variety of manufacturers - at a much lower price than the dedicated professional film scanners.

                    Joe

                    --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, "Nora" <von_drago@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I've been meaning to post about the scanner I finally got back in Decembe, seems like a good time.
                    >
                    > It's a Nikon Coolscan 4000 (not the newest model) that I bought used.
                    > It's specific for slides & negatives not just a flatbed scanner with an adapter or special slot. The Nikon models have software for either Mac or PC, are the type generally used in professional labs & it works a treat.
                    >
                    > Downside? They're not cheap so you have to balance the volume of slides you need to scan versus the cost. The labs will generally charge around $1 USD per slide; the scanner start at well over $1,000 USD when new. If you can get a used one (like mine) you can sometimes halve that cost.
                    >
                    > Personally I'll be looking for some comission jobs on people's slides to try & defray the cost. But even with just my family slides & ones we anticipate getting for the ICG Archives (we've already used it for some ofr that) it'll still be worth it.
                    >
                    > Nora
                    >
                    > --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, Barb Schofield <wilberforcebarb@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hi Joe;
                    > >  
                    > > Thank you so much, and I will pass this information on to the costumer who wanted to know.  If we need any more help we will contact you directly.
                    > >  
                    > > Barb
                    > >
                    > > --- On Fri, 2/12/10, joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > From: joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@>
                    > > Subject: [ICG-D] Re: Scanning Slides
                    > > To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com
                    > > Received: Friday, February 12, 2010, 11:56 PM
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >  
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Hi, Barb
                    > >
                    > > Any scanner would have the appropriate installation software for both PC and Mac.
                    > >
                    > > I bought mine through futureshop.ca. You can also buy the same scanner (and many others) through henrys.ca, and probably at the main Henry's store in downtown Toronto.
                    > >
                    > > Other than that, it is (as always) a question of cost vs. quality. A $200 scanner will do well enough for web sites and snapshot size pictures. For large blowups (or severe cropping), you would need a more expensive one. The two Epson scanners that I mentioned below (high/low price) are available at both henrys.ca and futureshop.ca
                    > >
                    > > Let me know if I can provide more detailed information.
                    > >
                    > > Joe
                    > >
                    > > --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups. com, Barb Schofield <wilberforcebarb@ ...> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > I read some of the comments on scanning slides but don't really understand the technical stuff.  I just got an enquiry about slide scanners that would work with a MAC computer.  Can anyone give me any recommendations.
                    > > >  
                    > > > Barb
                    > > >
                    >
                  • Nora
                    Even with the improvements in flatbeds I would say that the Nikon is still easier to use & produces a higher quality scan more reliably. Having said that, it s
                    Message 9 of 26 , Feb 13, 2010
                      Even with the improvements in flatbeds I would say that the Nikon is still easier to use & produces a higher quality scan more reliably.

                      Having said that, it's certainly not for everybody & for most people the results from a flatbed (we have both an Espon & 2 HPs) are sufficient.

                      I'd say if you had a significant amount of slides the flatbed would get tedious pretty fast.

                      Nora

                      --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, "joe_aspler" <joseph.aspler@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Nora:
                      >
                      > Your Nikon dedicated film/slide scanner is an excellent piece of equipment. As recently as five years ago, I would have said that dedicated scanners like the Nikon were the only way to go. Back in those dark ages, the film/slide attachments for household flatbed document scanners gave very poor quality scans.
                      >
                      > However, that has changed, and I would say that many flatbed scanners can compete with the dedicated scanners, for anything other than top of the line quality/volume needs. Hence, you can still get a good deal on a desktop scanner that will handle household document and film/slide needs, from a variety of manufacturers - at a much lower price than the dedicated professional film scanners.
                      >
                      > Joe
                      >
                      > --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, "Nora" <von_drago@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > I've been meaning to post about the scanner I finally got back in Decembe, seems like a good time.
                      > >
                      > > It's a Nikon Coolscan 4000 (not the newest model) that I bought used.
                      > > It's specific for slides & negatives not just a flatbed scanner with an adapter or special slot. The Nikon models have software for either Mac or PC, are the type generally used in professional labs & it works a treat.
                      > >
                      > > Downside? They're not cheap so you have to balance the volume of slides you need to scan versus the cost. The labs will generally charge around $1 USD per slide; the scanner start at well over $1,000 USD when new. If you can get a used one (like mine) you can sometimes halve that cost.
                      > >
                      > > Personally I'll be looking for some comission jobs on people's slides to try & defray the cost. But even with just my family slides & ones we anticipate getting for the ICG Archives (we've already used it for some ofr that) it'll still be worth it.
                      > >
                      > > Nora
                      > >
                      > > --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, Barb Schofield <wilberforcebarb@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Hi Joe;
                      > > >  
                      > > > Thank you so much, and I will pass this information on to the costumer who wanted to know.  If we need any more help we will contact you directly.
                      > > >  
                      > > > Barb
                      > > >
                      > > > --- On Fri, 2/12/10, joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > From: joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@>
                      > > > Subject: [ICG-D] Re: Scanning Slides
                      > > > To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com
                      > > > Received: Friday, February 12, 2010, 11:56 PM
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >  
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > Hi, Barb
                      > > >
                      > > > Any scanner would have the appropriate installation software for both PC and Mac.
                      > > >
                      > > > I bought mine through futureshop.ca. You can also buy the same scanner (and many others) through henrys.ca, and probably at the main Henry's store in downtown Toronto.
                      > > >
                      > > > Other than that, it is (as always) a question of cost vs. quality. A $200 scanner will do well enough for web sites and snapshot size pictures. For large blowups (or severe cropping), you would need a more expensive one. The two Epson scanners that I mentioned below (high/low price) are available at both henrys.ca and futureshop.ca
                      > > >
                      > > > Let me know if I can provide more detailed information.
                      > > >
                      > > > Joe
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups. com, Barb Schofield <wilberforcebarb@ ...> wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > I read some of the comments on scanning slides but don't really understand the technical stuff.  I just got an enquiry about slide scanners that would work with a MAC computer.  Can anyone give me any recommendations.
                      > > > >  
                      > > > > Barb
                      > > > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • ImageCraft
                      I just sold my LS-4000 with the roll film adapter, but that s only because I have a LS-8000 also. The flatbed is pretty good, but the best ones (Epson V750,
                      Message 10 of 26 , Feb 13, 2010
                        I just sold my LS-4000 with the roll film adapter, but that's only because I
                        have a LS-8000 also.

                        The flatbed is pretty good, but the best ones (Epson V750, etc.) cost not a
                        whole lot less.

                        As a professional photographer, the dedicated neg scanners are still much
                        better. For home use by most people, they are good enough. But if you have
                        lots of slides to scan, then the slide loader is a godsend.

                        On Sat, Feb 13, 2010 at 3:53 PM, Nora <von_drago@...> wrote:

                        >
                        >
                        > Even with the improvements in flatbeds I would say that the Nikon is still
                        > easier to use & produces a higher quality scan more reliably.
                        >
                        > Having said that, it's certainly not for everybody & for most people the
                        > results from a flatbed (we have both an Espon & 2 HPs) are sufficient.
                        >
                        > I'd say if you had a significant amount of slides the flatbed would get
                        > tedious pretty fast.
                        >
                        > Nora
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com <ICG-D%40yahoogroups.com>, "joe_aspler"
                        > <joseph.aspler@...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Nora:
                        > >
                        > > Your Nikon dedicated film/slide scanner is an excellent piece of
                        > equipment. As recently as five years ago, I would have said that dedicated
                        > scanners like the Nikon were the only way to go. Back in those dark ages,
                        > the film/slide attachments for household flatbed document scanners gave very
                        > poor quality scans.
                        > >
                        > > However, that has changed, and I would say that many flatbed scanners can
                        > compete with the dedicated scanners, for anything other than top of the line
                        > quality/volume needs. Hence, you can still get a good deal on a desktop
                        > scanner that will handle household document and film/slide needs, from a
                        > variety of manufacturers - at a much lower price than the dedicated
                        > professional film scanners.
                        > >
                        > > Joe
                        > >
                        > > --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com <ICG-D%40yahoogroups.com>, "Nora"
                        > <von_drago@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > I've been meaning to post about the scanner I finally got back in
                        > Decembe, seems like a good time.
                        > > >
                        > > > It's a Nikon Coolscan 4000 (not the newest model) that I bought used.
                        > > > It's specific for slides & negatives not just a flatbed scanner with an
                        > adapter or special slot. The Nikon models have software for either Mac or
                        > PC, are the type generally used in professional labs & it works a treat.
                        > > >
                        > > > Downside? They're not cheap so you have to balance the volume of slides
                        > you need to scan versus the cost. The labs will generally charge around $1
                        > USD per slide; the scanner start at well over $1,000 USD when new. If you
                        > can get a used one (like mine) you can sometimes halve that cost.
                        > > >
                        > > > Personally I'll be looking for some comission jobs on people's slides
                        > to try & defray the cost. But even with just my family slides & ones we
                        > anticipate getting for the ICG Archives (we've already used it for some ofr
                        > that) it'll still be worth it.
                        > > >
                        > > > Nora
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com <ICG-D%40yahoogroups.com>, Barb Schofield
                        > <wilberforcebarb@> wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Hi Joe;
                        > > > > �
                        > > > > Thank you so much, and I will pass this information on to the
                        > costumer who wanted to know.� If we need any more help we will contact you
                        > directly.
                        > > > > �
                        > > > > Barb
                        > > > >
                        > > > > --- On Fri, 2/12/10, joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@> wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > > From: joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@>
                        > > > > Subject: [ICG-D] Re: Scanning Slides
                        > > > > To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com <ICG-D%40yahoogroups.com>
                        > > > > Received: Friday, February 12, 2010, 11:56 PM
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > > �
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Hi, Barb
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Any scanner would have the appropriate installation software for both
                        > PC and Mac.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > I bought mine through futureshop.ca. You can also buy the same
                        > scanner (and many others) through henrys.ca, and probably at the main
                        > Henry's store in downtown Toronto.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Other than that, it is (as always) a question of cost vs. quality. A
                        > $200 scanner will do well enough for web sites and snapshot size pictures.
                        > For large blowups (or severe cropping), you would need a more expensive one.
                        > The two Epson scanners that I mentioned below (high/low price) are available
                        > at both henrys.ca and futureshop.ca
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Let me know if I can provide more detailed information.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Joe
                        > > > >
                        > > > > --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups. com, Barb Schofield <wilberforcebarb@ ...>
                        > wrote:
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > I read some of the comments on scanning slides but don't really
                        > understand the technical stuff.��� I just got an enquiry about slide
                        > scanners that would work with a MAC computer.��� Can anyone give me any
                        > recommendations.
                        > > > > > ���
                        > > > > > Barb
                        > > > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        >


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Nora & Bruce Mai
                        Or if they totally give up I ll be offering a slide-scanning service to interested parties (after CC). Anyone interested can contact me off-list. Nora Mai ...
                        Message 11 of 26 , Apr 8, 2010
                          Or if they totally give up I'll be offering a slide-scanning service to interested parties (after CC).
                          Anyone interested can contact me off-list.

                          Nora Mai

                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ICG-D@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Barb Schofield
                          Sent: Friday, February 12, 2010 11:12 PM
                          To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [ICG-D] Re: Scanning Slides

                          Hi Joe;

                          Thank you so much, and I will pass this information on to the costumer who wanted to know. If we need any more help we will contact you directly.

                          Barb

                          --- On Fri, 2/12/10, joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@...> wrote:


                          From: joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@...>
                          Subject: [ICG-D] Re: Scanning Slides
                          To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com
                          Received: Friday, February 12, 2010, 11:56 PM






                          Hi, Barb

                          Any scanner would have the appropriate installation software for both PC and Mac.

                          I bought mine through futureshop.ca. You can also buy the same scanner (and many others) through henrys.ca, and probably at the main Henry's store in downtown Toronto.

                          Other than that, it is (as always) a question of cost vs. quality. A $200 scanner will do well enough for web sites and snapshot size pictures. For large blowups (or severe cropping), you would need a more expensive one. The two Epson scanners that I mentioned below (high/low price) are available at both henrys.ca and futureshop.ca

                          Let me know if I can provide more detailed information.

                          Joe

                          --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups. com, Barb Schofield <wilberforcebarb@ ...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I read some of the comments on scanning slides but don't really understand the technical stuff. I just got an enquiry about slide scanners that would work with a MAC computer. Can anyone give me any recommendations.
                          > Â
                          > Barb
                          >
                          > --- On Fri, 12/18/09, joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@ ...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > From: joe_aspler <joseph.aspler@ ...>
                          > Subject: [ICG-D] Re: Scanning Slides
                          > To: ICG-D@yahoogroups. com
                          > Received: Friday, December 18, 2009, 6:40 PM
                          >
                          >
                          > Â
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > I have many hundreds of scanned slides and negatives from my days attending cons. Some may remember me from the 1980s, before mortgage & family tied me down. I took pictures at a bunch of Worldcons, a couple of Costumecons (1987 and 1989) and a bunch of regional cons. Now I only attend the annual Montreal regional con, so this year's Worldcon was my first in 21 years.
                          >
                          > Pierre and Sandy: I tried to contact you after Worldcon this year about circulating or otherwise uploading my set of scanned images, but my emails kept bouncing back.
                          >
                          > Originally, dedicated negative/slide scanners were specialized, expensive items. Now, many desktop scanners have film scanning accessories. The quality of home scanners had greatly improved over the last few years, and the price has come way down. I bought a new home scanner about six months ago, and I'm truly astonished at some of its features, particularly its ability to correct badly degraded Kodacolour negatives from the 1960s and 1970s. Kodacolour is a notoriously non-archival film stock, as opposed to Kodachrome (extremely archival) and Ektachrome (respectably archival)
                          >
                          > I have an Epson V700 scanner ($600 at epson.com, and I'm sure much cheaper at any discount electronics store). There is also (for example) the Epson V500 scanner ($180 at epson.com).
                          >
                          > I've scanned many thousands of slides and negatives, starting with those from when I was a very young photographer indeed.
                          >
                          > I normally scan at 3200 dots per inch. That's equivalent to about a 10 Megapixel digital camera image. However, be warned: in scanners, just as in digital cameras, a high dots per inch doesn't mean much if you have poor quality optics. In my shopping around, both Epson scanners mentioned here could do 3200 dots per inch. The image quality from the cheaper one would do for most home and Powerpoint show purposes. However, when you go to extreme blowups, the quality of the optics of the more expensive scanner really shows through.
                          >
                          > The preceeding concerns my equipment of choice (Epson), but the equivalent statments could also be made about others, especially Canon and HP.
                          >
                          > Joe Aspler
                          >









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