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Re: [ICG-D] Question on degrees (Fashion or Costume)

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  • JanxAngel
    Thank you all very much for help on this. I ll look into the resources you ve so helpfully pointed out. :) ... [Non-text portions of this message have been
    Message 1 of 19 , Mar 4 6:09 AM
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      Thank you all very much for help on this. I'll look into the resources
      you've so helpfully pointed out. :)

      On Tue, Mar 3, 2009 at 6:13 PM, Lisa A Ashton <lisa58@...> wrote:

      > Disclaimer: I don't have ANY kind of fashion or costume or theater
      > degree, but I know someone who has fairly recently graduated from a
      > costume-degree program and is working in cinema doing it. Her name is
      > Jenni Dryden, and some of you may know her from Philcon a few years back
      > (and I think she does Dragon Con and some other cons as well). VERY
      > talented.
      >
      > Her email is jennidryden@... <jennidryden%40yahoo.com>. She would
      > probably be willing to
      > talk to you. I think she is living in Atlanta now.
      >
      > Yours in costuming Lisa A>
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • jilbyfuzz
      It depends on what you are looking for. Are you wanting to be able to design but actually make the costumes? Or do you want to design the costumes then hand
      Message 2 of 19 , Mar 4 8:23 AM
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        It depends on what you are looking for. Are you wanting to be able to design but actually make the costumes? Or do you want to design the costumes then hand them over to someone to make them?

        My university made people get a Bachalor of Theater Arts in Theater Tech , and then get a masters in costume design if you wanted to make costumes ( I don't agree with that)

        The instructors actually had people who wanted to design but still be able to make costumes have a major in Clothing Design, with a minor in theater arts. Then Major in Theater Tech, with minor in Clothing design if you want to costruct costumes.

        I didn't know what I wanted and got my degree in Home Ec Education, but went back to school to get an advanced Diploma in Costume Construction at Toi Whakaari: The National Drama School of New Zealand. While I can make and design all kinds of things I don't have the back ground that many of my cohorts have that have Bachalor of Theater Arts. They know the theater, but not the fashion end, while I know the fashion & design end but not the principals of theater arts.



        Also speak with people at the university. I later found out that the theater department at my university might have been willing to do a specialized degree for me if I had asked. They might be willing to work with the fashion design program to build you a degree to cover both aspects of where you want to go with your education.

        Long story short sit down and write what you want to learn, or feel you need to learn. Look at what different schools/programs offer and compare it to your list. The ones that match your list closest are most likely what you are looking for.
      • Signe
        ... A costume designer definitely has to be able to draw, if they want to join the costume designers union. A while back, when my mom was living in NYC, she
        Message 3 of 19 , Mar 11 5:01 PM
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          --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, K├Ąthe Barrows <kaytab@...> wrote:
          >
          > From here on the outside, I'd guess a fashion designer needs to know how to
          > draw those fashion designs, which a costume designer wouldn't, and

          A costume designer definitely has to be able to draw, if they want to join the costume designers' union. A while back, when my mom was living in NYC, she sewed for a costume designer who was in the process of applying to the union. The union wanted to see a portfolio which had drawings of costume designs for various theatrical productions and photographs showing the actual completed costumes. The designer that my mom was working for was a great designer, but at the time, his drawing skills were just OK. So he was taking fashion drawing classes to improve his drawing skills as part of his preparation for applying to the union.

          Signe
        • JanxAngel
          I want to be able to design and make. I m not so much of a control freak but I like to hang on to my vision for lack of a better term. I like to be able to
          Message 4 of 19 , Mar 11 8:05 PM
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            I want to be able to design and make. I'm not so much of a control freak
            but I like to hang on to my "vision" for lack of a better term. I like to
            be able to take it from my head to fabric myself.

            On Wed, Mar 4, 2009 at 12:23 PM, jilbyfuzz <shanntarra@...> wrote:

            > It depends on what you are looking for. Are you wanting to be able to
            > design but actually make the costumes? Or do you want to design the costumes
            > then hand them over to someone to make them?
            >
            > My university made people get a Bachalor of Theater Arts in Theater Tech ,
            > and then get a masters in costume design if you wanted to make costumes ( I
            > don't agree with that)
            >
            > The instructors actually had people who wanted to design but still be able
            > to make costumes have a major in Clothing Design, with a minor in theater
            > arts. Then Major in Theater Tech, with minor in Clothing design if you want
            > to costruct costumes.
            >
            > I didn't know what I wanted and got my degree in Home Ec Education, but
            > went back to school to get an advanced Diploma in Costume Construction at
            > Toi Whakaari: The National Drama School of New Zealand. While I can make and
            > design all kinds of things I don't have the back ground that many of my
            > cohorts have that have Bachalor of Theater Arts. They know the theater, but
            > not the fashion end, while I know the fashion & design end but not the
            > principals of theater arts.
            >
            > Also speak with people at the university. I later found out that the
            > theater department at my university might have been willing to do a
            > specialized degree for me if I had asked. They might be willing to work with
            > the fashion design program to build you a degree to cover both aspects of
            > where you want to go with your education.
            >
            > Long story short sit down and write what you want to learn, or feel you
            > need to learn. Look at what different schools/programs offer and compare it
            > to your list. The ones that match your list closest are most likely what you
            > are looking for.
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Martina Livingston
            It also depends on what kind of costuming you are doing. Not everyone works in Theatre who is a costume designer. Having a business background is essential to
            Message 5 of 19 , Mar 12 10:32 AM
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              It also depends on what kind of costuming you are doing. Not everyone works
              in Theatre who is a costume designer. Having a business background is
              essential to founding and successfully running a costume manufacturing
              company. On top of the fashion degree, of course. If feel it is more
              important to know how to assemble a great many kinds of clothing than just
              costumes.

              Martina Livingston
              mlh www.mlhdesigns.com
              858-292-6083 tel 858-292-0113 fax




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • JanxAngel
              Right now I design and make both costumes and niche clothes. My only training was the sewing class I took in high school in 94. My mind can envision a lot,
              Message 6 of 19 , Mar 13 7:47 AM
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                Right now I design and make both costumes and niche clothes. My only
                training was the sewing class I took in high school in 94. My mind can
                envision a lot, but I don't know how to build a great deal of it because
                there's no pattern I can work off of. Sewing classes in high schools
                nowadays might teach you things like draping and drafting, but at my school,
                they taught you how to read a pattern, thread a machine, and not get your
                fingers caught in it. Also when I say costumes, I do not mean theatre
                costumes. I know there are large differences between regular clothes and
                theatre costumes, but I have no idea where to even begin to make the
                latter. I want to learn all the other skills I'm lacking in order to be
                successful at this.

                On Thu, Mar 12, 2009 at 1:32 PM, Martina Livingston <
                mlhdesigns@...> wrote:

                > It also depends on what kind of costuming you are doing. Not everyone
                > works
                > in Theatre who is a costume designer. Having a business background is
                > essential to founding and successfully running a costume manufacturing
                > company. On top of the fashion degree, of course. If feel it is more
                > important to know how to assemble a great many kinds of clothing than just
                > costumes.
                >
                > Martina Livingston
                > mlh www.mlhdesigns.com
                > 858-292-6083 tel 858-292-0113 fax
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Martina Livingston
                My advice remains to get a fashion degree. Start with pattermaking and construction and go from there. While you are at it, minor in business or get an AA in
                Message 7 of 19 , Mar 13 10:13 AM
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                  My advice remains to get a fashion degree. Start with pattermaking and
                  construction and go from there. While you are at it, minor in business or
                  get an AA in it so you know how to run your business.

                  Good luck,

                  Martina



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Signe
                  ... When my mom was living in NYC, she worked for several different costume designers, including a professional costume shop which built costumes for Broadway
                  Message 8 of 19 , Mar 14 11:11 PM
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                    --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, JanxAngel <janxangel@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Right now I design and make both costumes and niche clothes. My only
                    > training was the sewing class I took in high school in 94. My mind can
                    > envision a lot, but I don't know how to build a great deal of it because
                    > there's no pattern I can work off of.

                    When my mom was living in NYC, she worked for several different costume designers, including a professional costume shop which built costumes for Broadway shows and TV commercials.

                    Like you, she was essentially self taught and wanted to learn more about pattern drafting and draping, as well as garment construction. She took some evening courses at Fashion Institute of Technology in NYC. She didn't have to commit to the time and expense of doing a 4 year program. The people in her classes had day jobs and came from a variety of different backgrounds. There might be a school in your area with evening classes, similar to FIT's, where you don't have to commit to a 4 year program and you can select the classes that best fit your needs.

                    Hope this helps,
                    Signe
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