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Re: Kanji T-shirts (was: Re: [ICG-D] Transportation Directions in Japan)

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  • Richard
    There is a whole site on Japlish, T-shirts included. Google is your friend. My favorite is one that has smiley faces and happy flowers with the words something
    Message 1 of 23 , Mar 1, 2007
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      There is a whole site on Japlish, T-shirts included. Google is your friend.
      My favorite is one that has smiley faces and happy flowers with the words
      something like "I am so unhappy I am going to kill myself."

      At 10:27 PM 3/1/2007, Steve Swope wrote:
      >A shop here in St. Louis used to sell shirts that read "baka gaijin"
      >("crazy foreignher", approximately). I, myself, would love to get
      >one that translates to, "These stupid tourists will buy anything!"
      >
      >

      // richard (This email is for mailing lists. To reach me directly, please
      use richard at imagecraft.com)
    • Jeff Morris
      ... Please don t. I m finding all this incredibly fascinating and I m sure others are too. JSM
      Message 2 of 23 , Mar 2, 2007
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        >
        > Sorry Jeff, I will stop now.
        >

        Please don't. I'm finding all this incredibly fascinating and I'm sure
        others are too.

        JSM
      • Pierre & Sandy Pettinger
        ... Excuse me. My mind was completely asleep. That should be epitome not nadir. Pierre ... Those Who Fail To Learn History Are Doomed to Repeat It; Those Who
        Message 3 of 23 , Mar 2, 2007
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          At 06:05 PM 3/1/2007, you wrote:

          >Very true. Cheng-sensei, my Japanese language instructor many years
          >ago, liked to tell the story of an American who wore a t-shirt with
          >kanji on it. An elderly Japanese man bowed to him and said thank you.
          >He later asked Cheng-sensei about it and found out the kanji promoted
          >an ultra-nationalistic Japanese group who, in general, promoted the
          >Japanese as the nadir of the human race. Its always a good idea to
          >find out what your shirt says. It could just as easily have been a
          >phrase that insulted the Japanese.

          Excuse me. My mind was completely asleep. That should be epitome not nadir.

          Pierre

          >Pierre

          "Those Who Fail To Learn History
          Are Doomed to Repeat It;
          Those Who Fail To Learn History Correctly --
          Why They Are Simply Doomed.

          Achemdro'hm
          "The Illusion of Historical Fact"
          -- C.Y. 4971

          Andromeda
        • Byron Connell
          Really, how different is this from the use of French or German words and phrases in songs in English? (For example, Cole Porter s Wunderbar. ) Byron ...
          Message 4 of 23 , Mar 2, 2007
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            Really, how different is this from the use of French or German words and phrases in songs in English? (For example, Cole Porter's "Wunderbar.")

            Byron


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Heather Monson<mailto:hbmonson@...>
            To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com<mailto:ICG-D@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, March 01, 2007 7:33 PM
            Subject: Re: [ICG-D] Japanese and English Mixes


            Okay, totally off topic now... ;-)
            --- Carole Parker <mscip@...<mailto:mscip@...>> wrote:

            > One memory I have of that trip is hearing a Japanese pop song, and all
            > of a sudden, I hear looov-ov-e (held for a long time) in the song. Then
            > it reverted back to Japanese. Rather strange to hear, especially when
            > you consider that the Japanese language has its own word for love.

            Yup. The J-pop music industry actually has a list of English words that
            "sound cool" and are tied into as many songs as possible. "Love" is a
            really common one. There were some really odd ones that cropped up, too,
            but they're escaping me at the moment. Haven't listened to enough J-pop
            lately.

            > > Also worth noting, if reservations aren't an option: nicer hotels fill
            > > quickly when there are events in town, but if you look around for
            > > business
            > > hotels and ryokan (Japanese inns), they'll often have rooms open.
            >
            > Ummm, my experience was that the ryokan filled up first. At least, it
            > did in the metropolitan areas. Also, be prepared for a different toilet
            > situation if you go to a ryokan. They don't have toilets like most of
            > us are used to.

            Huh. That is odd. Regional differences, maybe? I was mostly in
            southwestern Honshu. Were the ones you found the resort-type ryokan, or
            just regular ones?

            Heather

            "Let's think the unthinkable, let's do the undoable, let's prepare to grapple with the ineffable itself, and see if we may not eff it after all." --Douglas Adams

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          • Byron Connell
            Just drag it by the hair back to costuming. (What do you wear when you get out of the goemon-burou?) Byron ... From: Heather Monson
            Message 5 of 23 , Mar 2, 2007
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              Just drag it by the hair back to costuming. (What do you wear when you get out of the goemon-burou?)

              Byron


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Heather Monson<mailto:hbmonson@...>
              To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com<mailto:ICG-D@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thursday, March 01, 2007 8:06 PM
              Subject: Re: [ICG-D] Japanese and English Mixes


              LOL I remember those. Both varieties can be quite an adventure, even if
              you DO have a reasonably decent grasp of kanji. ;-) At the second place my
              hubby and I lived in Japan, we had an o-benjo (basically, an outhouse
              that's nominally linked to the house proper). We called it the Pit of
              Despair. We also had a goemon-burou (one of the big round tubs where you
              can sit neck-deep in steaming-hot water). That thing was soooo nice in the
              winter.

              Man, we're off topic...sorry, everyone...

              Heather

              --- Richard <richard-lists@...<mailto:richard-lists%40imagecraft.com>> wrote:

              > Japan is a culture taken to logical extremes. They often have the squat
              > porcelain toilet right next to the high tech wash and dry your butt
              > variety. I am not sure whether it is more amusing to hear stories about
              > the
              > former or latter, with the latter being that water is sprayed everywhere
              >
              > and every which way. This is where knowing the Kanji for STOP come in
              > handy :-)
              >
              > At 04:33 PM 3/1/2007, Heather Monson wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Ummm, my experience was that the ryokan filled up first. At least,
              > it
              > > > did in the metropolitan areas. Also, be prepared for a different
              > toilet
              > > > situation if you go to a ryokan. They don't have toilets like most
              > of
              > > > us are used to.
              > >
              > >Huh. That is odd. Regional differences, maybe? I was mostly in
              > >southwestern Honshu. Were the ones you found the resort-type ryokan, or
              > >just regular ones?
              >
              > // richard (This email is for mailing lists. To reach me directly,
              > please
              > use richard at imagecraft.com)
              >
              >

              "Let's think the unthinkable, let's do the undoable, let's prepare to grapple with the ineffable itself, and see if we may not eff it after all." --Douglas Adams

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            • Richard
              Several: - Often the Japanese users have no ideas what they mean - Japanese s native language do not have some English sounds, and with very few exceptions,
              Message 6 of 23 , Mar 2, 2007
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                Several:

                - Often the Japanese users have no ideas what they mean
                - Japanese's native language do not have some English sounds, and with very
                few exceptions, they cannot have a consonant following another. For
                example, in Anime, they do not say "Edward," they have to say Edowarudo.
                (everyday business use if of course different, they try their hardest to
                address you as "Richard" if needed be)
                - Japanese LOVE to contract long words. So Masquerade becomes Costume Play
                becomes Cosplay and you have a whole bunch of American thinking that the
                Japanese invented Cosplay :-) but I digress.

                At 05:42 PM 3/2/2007, Byron Connell wrote:
                >Really, how different is this from the use of French or German words and
                >phrases in songs in English? (For example, Cole Porter's "Wunderbar.")

                // richard (This email is for mailing lists. To reach me directly, please
                use richard at imagecraft.com)
              • Carole Parker
                ... It isn t. It just sounds so much different, though to an untrained ear. ... Until later-- Carole
                Message 7 of 23 , Mar 5, 2007
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                  On Friday, March 2, 2007, at 05:42 PM, Byron Connell wrote:

                  > Really, how different is this from the use of French or German words
                  > and phrases in songs in English? (For example, Cole Porter's
                  > "Wunderbar.")

                  It isn't. It just sounds so much different, though to an untrained ear.
                  :-)

                  Until later--

                  Carole
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