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How we'll all be feeling in less than 2 months . . .

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  • axejudge
    http://www.comics.com/comics/brevity/archive/brevity-20060408.html Karen
    Message 1 of 17 , Apr 8, 2006
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    • Andrew Trembley
      ... Now what? Well, now we take all that corn and make vodka out of it. I would have thought that was obvious. andy
      Message 2 of 17 , Apr 8, 2006
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        axejudge wrote:
        > http://www.comics.com/comics/brevity/archive/brevity-20060408.html
        >
        > Karen
        >
        >

        "Now what?"

        Well, now we take all that corn and make vodka out of it.

        I would have thought that was obvious.

        andy
      • Trudy Leonard
        Silly rabbit - From corn you make whiskey, you need the other state that starts with I for vodka - Idaho ( although I understand that vodka can be made from
        Message 3 of 17 , Apr 8, 2006
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          Silly rabbit -

          From corn you make whiskey, you need the other state that starts with I for
          vodka - Idaho ( although I understand that vodka can be made from just about
          anything if you're desperate enough).

          Speaking of vodka - would you consider exchanging a taste of your wasabi
          vodka for a bag of wasabi cashews?

          Trudy


          >From: Andrew Trembley <attrembl@...>
          >Reply-To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com
          >To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: Re: [ICG-D] How we'll all be feeling in less than 2 months . . .
          >Date: Sat, 08 Apr 2006 13:38:09 -0700
          >
          >axejudge wrote:
          > > http://www.comics.com/comics/brevity/archive/brevity-20060408.html
          > >
          > > Karen
          > >
          > >
          >
          >"Now what?"
          >
          >Well, now we take all that corn and make vodka out of it.
          >
          >I would have thought that was obvious.
          >
          >andy
        • Andrew Trembley
          ... You can make vodka from anything, it s just a matter of distilling it high enough. Most vodka isn t made from potatoes. Wheat actually makes the best
          Message 4 of 17 , Apr 9, 2006
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            Trudy Leonard wrote:
            > Silly rabbit -
            >
            > >From corn you make whiskey, you need the other state that starts with I for
            > vodka - Idaho ( although I understand that vodka can be made from just about
            > anything if you're desperate enough).
            >
            You can make vodka from anything, it's just a matter of distilling it
            high enough. Most vodka isn't made from potatoes. Wheat actually makes
            the best (simplest) vodka. I've had rye vodka, potato vodka and viognier
            (grape) vodka.

            Corn is commonly used to make whisky, but to make anything other than
            corn likker you need to boost the mix with other grains.

            > Speaking of vodka - would you consider exchanging a taste of your wasabi
            > vodka for a bag of wasabi cashews?
            >

            that could probably be arranged...

            andy
          • randwhit@aol.com
            In a message dated 4/8/2006 1:18:01 PM US Mountain Standard Time, axejudge@accessus.net writes:
            Message 5 of 17 , Apr 9, 2006
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              In a message dated 4/8/2006 1:18:01 PM US Mountain Standard Time,
              axejudge@... writes:

              http://www.comics.com/comics/brevity/archive/brevity-20060408.html

              Karen


              Actually, Des Moines is a bit south of center.

              There's actually a town called "State Center" at the geographic center.
              Must have taken the founders forever to come up with the name.

              Randall
              Iowa Expatriate


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Byron Connell
              Corn may be used to make rye, Bourbon, or Canadian whisky; however, the only kind with a distinctive taste -- Scotch -- is made mostly from barley. I ve never
              Message 6 of 17 , Apr 9, 2006
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                Corn may be used to make rye, Bourbon, or Canadian whisky; however, the only kind with a distinctive taste -- Scotch -- is made mostly from barley.

                I've never figured out what Irish whisky is made from.

                To keep this on thread, it's very unusual, today, for distillers of Scotch to wear kilts on the job.

                Byron


                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Andrew Trembley<mailto:attrembl@...>
                To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com<mailto:ICG-D@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Sunday, April 09, 2006 1:55 PM
                Subject: Re: [ICG-D] How we'll all be feeling in less than 2 months . . .


                Trudy Leonard wrote:
                > Silly rabbit -
                >
                > >From corn you make whiskey, you need the other state that starts with I for
                > vodka - Idaho ( although I understand that vodka can be made from just about
                > anything if you're desperate enough).
                >
                You can make vodka from anything, it's just a matter of distilling it
                high enough. Most vodka isn't made from potatoes. Wheat actually makes
                the best (simplest) vodka. I've had rye vodka, potato vodka and viognier
                (grape) vodka.

                Corn is commonly used to make whisky, but to make anything other than
                corn likker you need to boost the mix with other grains.

                > Speaking of vodka - would you consider exchanging a taste of your wasabi
                > vodka for a bag of wasabi cashews?
                >

                that could probably be arranged...

                andy

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • JoAnn Abbott
                To keep this on thread, it s very unusual, today, for distillers of Scotch to wear kilts on the job. Byron I know I am going to regret this..but do you know
                Message 7 of 17 , Apr 9, 2006
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                  To keep this on thread, it's very unusual, today, for distillers of Scotch to wear kilts on the job.

                  Byron


                  I know I am going to regret this..but do you know why?

                  JoAnn
                  bracing herself

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Lisa Harrigan
                  The difference between Irish and Scotch Whisky is where it is brewed. Irish also tend to be unblended (and thus varied from year to year), where as Scotch
                  Message 8 of 17 , Apr 10, 2006
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                    The difference between Irish and Scotch Whisky is where it is brewed.
                    Irish also tend to be unblended (and thus varied from year to year),
                    where as Scotch were, for a long time, blended (and were thus
                    consistant, more popular with the unsophiticated). The Scotch have
                    gotten smarter and do a lot more unblended bottles, less consistency,
                    but when it's good it's real good.

                    My husband got some San Francisco brewed Irish whisky, not the best but
                    the name is Harrigan's. He couldn't resist. :-)

                    Mythically yours,
                    Lisa Deutsch Harrigan

                    Byron Connell wrote:

                    > Corn may be used to make rye, Bourbon, or Canadian whisky; however,
                    > the only kind with a distinctive taste -- Scotch -- is made mostly
                    > from barley.
                    >
                    > I've never figured out what Irish whisky is made from.
                    >
                  • meerkatmeade
                    Unusual, but not un-heard of: http://www.utilikilts.com/photogall/gal02/fonn.html But no, I don t know why... -- Thomas A. ... the job.
                    Message 9 of 17 , Apr 10, 2006
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                      Unusual, but not un-heard of:

                      http://www.utilikilts.com/photogall/gal02/fonn.html

                      But no, I don't know why...

                      -- Thomas A.

                      --- In ICG-D@yahoogroups.com, "JoAnn Abbott" <bubblemum@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > To keep this on thread, it's very unusual, today, for distillers of Scotch to wear kilts on
                      the job.
                      >
                      > Byron
                      >
                      >
                      > I know I am going to regret this..but do you know why?
                      >
                      > JoAnn
                      > bracing herself
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                    • Andrew T Trembley
                      ... Irish and Scotch whisk(e)y are both malt-based spirits; they re primarily brewed from malted (sprouted) barley. Scotch malt is usually fired (roasted, to
                      Message 10 of 17 , Apr 10, 2006
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                        On Apr 10, 2006, at 10:40 AM, Lisa Harrigan wrote:
                        > The difference between Irish and Scotch Whisky is where it is brewed.
                        > Irish also tend to be unblended (and thus varied from year to year),
                        > where as Scotch were, for a long time, blended (and were thus
                        > consistant, more popular with the unsophiticated). The Scotch have
                        > gotten smarter and do a lot more unblended bottles, less consistency,
                        > but when it's good it's real good.

                        Irish and Scotch whisk(e)y are both malt-based spirits; they're
                        primarily brewed from malted (sprouted) barley. Scotch malt is usually
                        fired (roasted, to stop the germination) with peat fires. Peat produces
                        a very smoky flame and this smoke flavor gets into everything. Irish
                        malt is usually fired with gas or maybe wood fires. No smoke.

                        Malt whisk(e)y is usually distilled on a pot (or alambic) still.

                        Single-barrel malt whisk(e)y is decanted straight from the barrel to
                        bottle, and is bottled at barrel strength (somewhere between 110 and
                        130 proof). If it's barrel strength, you want to add a bit of cold
                        spring water to bring the proof down or you'll burn out your taste buds
                        (the taste is actually more rich and complex when it's a touch
                        watered).

                        Single-malt whisk(e)y is always made with only malted barley from a
                        single harvest (year), but different barrels from that malt are blended
                        together to even out the flavor. It's usually watered down to 70-90
                        proof.

                        Blended whisk(e)y is blended from different years' productions, and may
                        also include grain whisk(e)y made from unmalted barley, wheat, corn or
                        other grains distilled on a continuous (column or "Coffey") still.

                        --
                        Andy Trembley, Bull-in-Drag
                        The Bovine Illuminati (It's the Cows, Inc.)
                        http://www.bovil.com/
                        Moo!
                      • Molly Glenn
                        Thank you for that Andy. As a former resident of Scotland, I was about to blow my top when I read where as Scotch were, for a long time, blended . There s a
                        Message 11 of 17 , Apr 10, 2006
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                          Thank you for that Andy. As a former resident of
                          Scotland, I was about to blow my top when I read
                          "where as Scotch were, for a long time, blended".
                          There's a reason "single malt" is a phrase that only
                          Scots can officially use. Like Andy says, what makes
                          Scotch different is the fact that the barley is dried
                          over peat fires. I don't know about Irish whiskey,
                          but I do know that American whisky is generally
                          prepaired over charcoal.

                          The different water can also impact the flavor of
                          whiskey. It's what makes the difference between a
                          Lowland malt, Highland malt, Islay malt, and
                          Campbellton malt.

                          Also, remeber that "corn" once meant simply "grain"
                          and not "maize". In Britain, it tends to still mean
                          "grain" in general.

                          --Molly

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                        • Byron Connell
                          In Scotland today -- at least in the lowlands, in my observation -- most men wear trousers rather than kilts for everyday dress. You may see an occasional man
                          Message 12 of 17 , Apr 10, 2006
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                            In Scotland today -- at least in the lowlands, in my observation -- most men wear trousers rather than kilts for everyday dress. You may see an occasional man in a kilt; however, it seems to be pretty unusual. Last year, over a two week period between Glasgow and Edinburgh, I may have seen three. That's about what I remember seeing ten years ago, too.

                            This probably is an effect of English influence on the Scotch. It isn't a new development; I suspect it dates at least to the Second World War. In 1937, the British Army adopted battledress, which included trousers, as the every day uniform for all regiments, including the Highland regiments that had worn the kilt (covered by a khaki apron) with khaki service dress during the First World War.

                            Byron (serious response -- sorry)


                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: JoAnn Abbott<mailto:bubblemum@...>
                            To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com<mailto:ICG-D@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Sunday, April 09, 2006 9:38 PM
                            Subject: Re: [ICG-D] How we'll all be feeling in less than 2 months . . .


                            To keep this on thread, it's very unusual, today, for distillers of Scotch to wear kilts on the job.

                            Byron


                            I know I am going to regret this..but do you know why?

                            JoAnn
                            bracing herself

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • randwhit@aol.com
                            To keep this on thread, it s very unusual, today, for distillers of Scotch to wear kilts on the job. ______ On the other hand, a flask of scotch in your
                            Message 13 of 17 , Apr 10, 2006
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                              To keep this on thread, it's very unusual, today, for distillers of Scotch
                              to wear kilts on the job.


                              ______

                              On the other hand, a flask of scotch in your sporran is quite popular.

                              Randall


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Andrew T Trembley
                              ... For civilian Scots, a kilt (and the appropriate gear to go with it) is usually formal-wear. Where the formality of a tuxedo suit is defined by the color of
                              Message 14 of 17 , Apr 10, 2006
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                                On Apr 10, 2006, at 4:57 PM, Byron Connell wrote:
                                > This probably is an effect of English influence on the Scotch. It
                                > isn't a new development; I suspect it dates at least to the Second
                                > World War. In 1937, the British Army adopted battledress, which
                                > included trousers, as the every day uniform for all regiments,
                                > including the Highland regiments that had worn the kilt (covered by a
                                > khaki apron) with khaki service dress during the First World War.

                                For civilian Scots, a kilt (and the appropriate gear to go with it) is
                                usually formal-wear. Where the formality of a tuxedo suit is defined by
                                the color of tie, the formality of a kilt is defined by the type of
                                sporran. The only detail I remember is that a badger-head sporran can
                                be worn for both formal and semi-formal occasions.

                                --
                                Andy Trembley, Bull-in-Drag
                                The Bovine Illuminati (It's the Cows, Inc.)
                                http://www.bovil.com/
                                Moo!
                              • Andrew T Trembley
                                ... Single-malt is a relatively new addition to the field of commercial scotch whisky. Of course, commercial scotch is a relatively new idea in the history of
                                Message 15 of 17 , Apr 10, 2006
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                                  On Apr 10, 2006, at 4:42 PM, Molly Glenn wrote:
                                  > Thank you for that Andy. As a former resident of
                                  > Scotland, I was about to blow my top when I read
                                  > "where as Scotch were, for a long time, blended".
                                  > There's a reason "single malt" is a phrase that only
                                  > Scots can officially use. Like Andy says, what makes
                                  > Scotch different is the fact that the barley is dried
                                  > over peat fires. I don't know about Irish whiskey,
                                  > but I do know that American whisky is generally
                                  > prepaired over charcoal.

                                  Single-malt is a relatively new addition to the field of commercial
                                  scotch whisky. Of course, commercial scotch is a relatively new idea in
                                  the history of scotch. Illicit whisky was always small-batch
                                  single-malt, but still often scary firewater. Most commercial
                                  single-malts only have a bit over a hundred years' history. Many of the
                                  great single-malt distillers started out distilling for other blenders
                                  and bottlers, and still do, tainting their blending stock with a tiny
                                  bit of grain whisky or other adulterant before putting it in casks to
                                  ship out to their business customers (thus making it illegal to sell as
                                  single-malt).

                                  Single-malt doesn't always equal "good" and blended doesn't always
                                  equal "bad." I've got a few truly divine bottles of blended whisky, a
                                  bottle of scottish grain whisky (which can't be called scotch because
                                  there's no barley malt in it) and one vatted malt (a blended malt that
                                  contains only malt whiskys).

                                  Single-malt, though, isn't an exclusive Scottish term. Bushmill's Malt
                                  is a single-malt Irish whiskey. Anchor "Old Potrero" is single-malt rye
                                  whiskey (made exclusively from malted rye). St. George Spirits makes
                                  Alameda single-malt whiskey that sits somewhere between Irish malts and
                                  Scotch single-malts. Nikka Whisky Distillery in Japan produces several
                                  single-malt and single-cask whiskeys; their "Yoichi" is the only
                                  Japanese whiskey to be given an award by the Scotch Tasting Society.

                                  --
                                  andy trembley, Bitchy Design Queen - http://www.bovil.com/
                                  San Jose, CA - '72 R75/5 '86 R100 (mine) - '92 K75sa '03 R1150R
                                  (Kevin's)
                                  "It's not pink, it's peach-colored. Pink is tacky."
                                  --Manfred Pfirsich Marie Rommel

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                                • Trudy Leonard
                                  As in barleycorn , for all us folkies. Trudy
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Apr 10, 2006
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                                    As in "barleycorn", for all us folkies.

                                    Trudy


                                    >From: Molly Glenn <svengala_silvereye@...>
                                    >Reply-To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com
                                    >To: ICG-D@yahoogroups.com
                                    >Subject: Re: [ICG-D] How we'll all be feeling in less than 2 months . . .
                                    >Date: Mon, 10 Apr 2006 16:42:29 -0700 (PDT)
                                    >
                                    >Thank you for that Andy. As a former resident of
                                    >Scotland, I was about to blow my top when I read
                                    >"where as Scotch were, for a long time, blended".
                                    >There's a reason "single malt" is a phrase that only
                                    >Scots can officially use. Like Andy says, what makes
                                    >Scotch different is the fact that the barley is dried
                                    >over peat fires. I don't know about Irish whiskey,
                                    >but I do know that American whisky is generally
                                    >prepaired over charcoal.
                                    >
                                    >The different water can also impact the flavor of
                                    >whiskey. It's what makes the difference between a
                                    >Lowland malt, Highland malt, Islay malt, and
                                    >Campbellton malt.
                                    >
                                    >Also, remeber that "corn" once meant simply "grain"
                                    >and not "maize". In Britain, it tends to still mean
                                    >"grain" in general.
                                    >
                                    >--Molly
                                    >
                                    >__________________________________________________
                                    >Do You Yahoo!?
                                    >Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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                                  • Molly Glenn
                                    I would say the thing that really made kilts start to die out was how they were forbidden in the Disarming Act after the Jacobite revolution. There was much
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Apr 11, 2006
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                                      I would say the thing that really made kilts start to
                                      die out was how they were forbidden in the Disarming
                                      Act after the Jacobite revolution. There was much
                                      resentment about it, but the Prince Charles is one of
                                      if not the most modern accepted style of kilted dress,
                                      so you can see that people didn't wear it often enough
                                      after that period to develop a newer formal style.
                                      I'm pretty sure that the Montrose doublet is slightly
                                      older. And the evolution of the kilt itself stopped
                                      at that period with very little variation -- unless
                                      you count the utilikilt.

                                      As for sporrans, generally, today anything fitted with
                                      silver is considered evening dress, and fur is
                                      considered more flashy and therefor more likely to be
                                      evening dress. A full military (horsehair) sporran is
                                      always for extremely dressy occasions or pipe bands.
                                      It used to be that every-day sporrans were fancier,
                                      and the tassle arrangements once designated different
                                      regiments.

                                      You can even get pink fuzzy sporrans these days!

                                      If anyone is interested in more detail on the history
                                      of the sporran, I can quote some of the stuff from the
                                      recent Scottish Country Dancer Magazine on the
                                      subject. The previous issue had an intersting article
                                      on kilt hose.

                                      --Molly

                                      --- Andrew T Trembley <attrembl@...> wrote:

                                      > On Apr 10, 2006, at 4:57 PM, Byron Connell wrote:
                                      > > This probably is an effect of English influence on
                                      > the Scotch. It
                                      > > isn't a new development; I suspect it dates at
                                      > least to the Second
                                      > > World War. In 1937, the British Army adopted
                                      > battledress, which
                                      > > included trousers, as the every day uniform for
                                      > all regiments,
                                      > > including the Highland regiments that had worn the
                                      > kilt (covered by a
                                      > > khaki apron) with khaki service dress during the
                                      > First World War.
                                      >
                                      > For civilian Scots, a kilt (and the appropriate gear
                                      > to go with it) is
                                      > usually formal-wear. Where the formality of a tuxedo
                                      > suit is defined by
                                      > the color of tie, the formality of a kilt is defined
                                      > by the type of
                                      > sporran. The only detail I remember is that a
                                      > badger-head sporran can
                                      > be worn for both formal and semi-formal occasions.
                                      >
                                      > --
                                      > Andy Trembley, Bull-in-Drag
                                      > The Bovine Illuminati (It's the Cows, Inc.)
                                      > http://www.bovil.com/
                                      > Moo!
                                      >
                                      >


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