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RE: [ICG-D] a problem - advice needed

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  • Soseneda
    ... If you are beading through it (meaning the thread goes through the backing and beading happens once the backing is on) fusible is a down right nightmare.
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 7, 2004
      > Okay, here's how the latest problem is shaping out. I'm making the
      > gown out of crepe backed satin. There will be beading and sequin work
      > down the front; lots of beading and sequin work, emphasis on the
      > "beading", and we're talking mostly glass beads: seeds, rocailles, "E"
      > beads. This means that I have to re-enforce the fabric to take the
      > weight. I need advice on what to use for a backing.

      If you are beading through it (meaning the thread goes through the backing
      and beading happens once the backing is on) fusible is a down right
      nightmare.

      > I've checked out fusible fleece, which is what I used for the Faerie
      > King's coat, and that was perfect, but...One, the current version that
      > Wal-Mart is selling is a third of the thickness, which makes for a cooler
      > costume, but the fusible qualities are pathetic. And on top of that, I
      > think it would really ruin the flow.

      Sounds hot. If you are worried about flow or drape of the fabric, then skip
      the beading all together. Beading is flat out heavy. And it must be
      reinforced or it falls off usually.

      My usually method is to use an underlining of duck cloth or well worn denim
      (i.e. recycled jeans). Flat fell any seams to reduce bulk. Or, if you can
      get away with it, fray check the entire edge of the pattern piece and butt
      the seams with a flat zig zag (this means no seam allowances on the pieces).
      Bead through décor fabric and the denim, then back the whole thing in
      something soft and touchable. Usually I use felt put in by hand basting so
      that when it gets soaked in sweat, I can take it out and put on a new one.

      You can stitch in the ditch to attach the backing to the fabric. And If you
      need a nice symmetrical design etc. I suggest you do your beading on an
      appliqué base first, cut that out, apply to garment, then edge with a
      beading/sequin design. Appliqué bases can be anything sturdy, non-woven (not
      knit either) and mildly see-through to transparent.

      If you give me more details on the cut/line of the garment and where the
      flow/drape needs to be maintained maybe I can be more helpful.

      I have been costuming belly dancers for about 20 years. I also do theatre
      costuming and a lot of wedding dress sewing and alterations :)

      Shawna
    • Pierre & Sandy Pettinger
      Alix, Does Wal-Mart have rip-stop nylon at a reasonable price? Like you see in windbreakers, but not as stiff? That would be very strong but should still
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 7, 2004
        Alix,

        Does Wal-Mart have rip-stop nylon at a reasonable price? Like you see in
        windbreakers, but not as stiff? That would be very strong but should still
        maintain the drape, especially if it is washed a couple of times first. In
        a light color or one that nearly matches the satin, it shouldn't show. The
        problem I see with tulle on the outside is that it will dull the shine of
        the satin. Of course, if you don't need the shine, it's not such a big deal.
        One might also investigate the Internet for used/surplus parachutes or
        parachute fabric. Just a thought.

        Sandy

        At 10:55 AM 10/7/2004, you wrote:
        >Gentlebeings:
        > Okay, here's how the latest problem is shaping out. I'm making the
        > gown out of crepe backed satin. There will be beading and sequin work
        > down the front; lots of beading and sequin work, emphasis on the
        > "beading", and we're talking mostly glass beads: seeds, rocailles, "E"
        > beads. This means that I have to re-enforce the fabric to take the
        > weight. I need advice on what to use for a backing.
        > Final step. I checked out tulle. I've found that as long as I stay
        > away from black, which is very brittle for some reason, that tulle is
        > actually quite strong, and will take a lot of wait. This got me to
        > thinking about sewing the tulle to the outside of the costume, and doing
        > the work that way; the tulle would strengthen the fabric, and the satin
        > would return the favour, and the costume would still more properly.
        >
        >Alixandra

        "Those Who Fail To Learn History
        Are Doomed to Repeat It;
        Those Who Fail To Learn History Correctly --
        Why They Are Simply Doomed.

        Achemdro'hm
        "The Illusion of Historical Fact"
        -- C.Y. 4971

        Andromeda
      • Lisa A. Ashton
        Dear Alix-- You may think that tulle wil take a fair amount of weight, but I would never useit for support for beaded embroidery, whether on the front or the
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 8, 2004
          Dear Alix--

          You may think that tulle wil take a fair amount of weight, but I would
          never useit for support for beaded embroidery, whether on the front or
          the inside of the costume. If you want to use it between teh beads and
          the satin for it's decorative qualities, fine, but you need real
          structure if you're going to put a lot of glass beads onto fabric.

          Even a fairly thin fusible or interfacing ought to work. If you can only
          find interfacing without the fusible adhesive, just pin it on, or get
          some of the light spray adhesive that is sold for quilts, or just think
          out some white glue and thinly apply it to the interfacing. Generally,
          you'll be putting the larger areas of beadwork on a part of the garment
          that lies flat, so this will work. If you have beadwork that has to go
          on a drapey part of the fabric (skirt bottom, etc), sometimes you can use
          thin strips of any soft fabric under the fabric base, and just trim off
          the excess.

          The other thing that I have done is to use pre-quilted fabric, which has
          enough structure of its own to stand up to beadwork.

          If there is something in particular you need and cannot find, tell me
          off-line and I'll try to send it to you. I may have some things in my
          stashthat would work, although right now I don''t have a lot of
          fusibles.I do have some black (well, gray) fairly thin interfacing that
          is very soft.

          Much of what I do is lined--I will often bead through the fabric and
          lining together to give enough strength.

          Yours in costuming, Lisa A.
        • Alix
          ... Flag fabric! Right! I should have thought of that one. ... Well, I m not certain that shine is a problem since I m going to bead, sequin, and glitter it
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 8, 2004
            Dear Sandy:

            > Does Wal-Mart have rip-stop nylon at a reasonable price? Like you see in
            > > windbreakers, but not as stiff? That would be very strong but should
            > still > maintain the drape, especially if it is washed a couple of times
            > first.

            Flag fabric! Right! I should have thought of that one.

            > problem I see with tulle on the outside is that it will dull the shine of
            > > the satin.

            Well, I'm not certain that shine is a problem since I'm going to bead,
            sequin, and glitter it to death.
            Thanks for the imput.

            Peace
            Alixandra
            eddana@...
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