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Re: my next novel

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  • joanszechtman
    Kris, like most here, I d also lean towards the third choice. *But* despite that, I think you should work on the subject and characters that grip you when you
    Message 1 of 15 , Sep 1, 2009
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      Kris, like most here, I'd also lean towards the third choice. *But* despite that, I think you should work on the subject and characters that grip you when you sit down to write. Otherwise, IMO, it will be forced.--Joan
    • Kris Jackson
      Joan, that s an interesting subject. Should you only work when you re inspired ? A lot of people would say yes. But I have worked as a cartoonist on a daily
      Message 2 of 15 , Sep 1, 2009
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        Joan, that's an interesting subject. Should you only work when you're "inspired"? A lot of people would say yes. But I have worked as a cartoonist on a daily strip, and also made a living selling paintings. That means working when you're not inspired. Then you have to just suck it up and do it anyway. Sometimes that's reflected in the work. Sometimes you fake being inspired and manage to do something worthwhile anyway.

        The ideal thing would be to be inspired all the time. I think I've mentioned Stephen King once described his muse as kind of looking like Jack Webb saying "Get to work." The guy has made more money than he could ever spend, but he still has to sit there and pound the keys every day. The only day he doesn't write, he says, is July 4th.

        I've started the Great Flood story, tentatively titled "In the Year of the Water." It's a subject that's interested me since I heard it in Sunday School and imagined all the poor people fleeing to higher ground, just to have the world swallowed up by water anyway. I just wrote something describing someone looking down into the water and seeing trees as far down as they can see. No, the story didn't grip me as hard as the Antietam story, and I've already developed those two main characters, and I've sort of found my Nineteenth-Century voice from the other book. But now I'm looking down through the water at those treetops, and they're fading as the water gets deeper, and I like what I see.

        --Kris Jackson
        Author of Above the Fray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps
        krisjacksondesign.com
        774-276-0116


        On Tue, 2009-09-01 at 07:22 +0000, joanszechtman wrote:
         
        Kris, like most here, I'd also lean towards the third choice. *But* despite that, I think you should work on the subject and characters that grip you when you sit down to write. Otherwise, IMO, it will be forced.--Joan




      • Celia Hayes
        I kind of agree with Kris - you can t stick around until you are inspired. Writing is your job, you should think of it as what you do for a living. Personally,
        Message 3 of 15 , Sep 1, 2009
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          I kind of agree with Kris - you can't stick around until you are inspired. Writing is your job, you should think of it as what you do for a living. Personally, I find deadlines very inspiring, even self-imposed ones.

          Celia Hayes
          Author: "To Truckee's Trail"  & "The Adelsverein Trilogy"
          Independent Authors' Guild Website Drudge


          --- On Tue, 9/1/09, Kris Jackson <kris@...> wrote:

          From: Kris Jackson <kris@...>
          Subject: Re: [IAG-members] Re: my next novel
          To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 11:42 AM

           

          Joan, that's an interesting subject. Should you only work when you're "inspired"? A lot of people would say yes. But I have worked as a cartoonist on a daily strip, and also made a living selling paintings. That means working when you're not inspired. Then you have to just suck it up and do it anyway. Sometimes that's reflected in the work. Sometimes you fake being inspired and manage to do something worthwhile anyway.

          The ideal thing would be to be inspired all the time. I think I've mentioned Stephen King once described his muse as kind of looking like Jack Webb saying "Get to work." The guy has made more money than he could ever spend, but he still has to sit there and pound the keys every day. The only day he doesn't write, he says, is July 4th.

          I've started the Great Flood story, tentatively titled "In the Year of the Water." It's a subject that's interested me since I heard it in Sunday School and imagined all the poor people fleeing to higher ground, just to have the world swallowed up by water anyway. I just wrote something describing someone looking down into the water and seeing trees as far down as they can see. No, the story didn't grip me as hard as the Antietam story, and I've already developed those two main characters, and I've sort of found my Nineteenth-Century voice from the other book. But now I'm looking down through the water at those treetops, and they're fading as the water gets deeper, and I like what I see.


          --Kris Jackson
          Author of Above the Fray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps
          krisjacksondesign. com
          774-276-0116


          On Tue, 2009-09-01 at 07:22 +0000, joanszechtman wrote:

           
          Kris, like most here, I'd also lean towards the third choice. *But* despite that, I think you should work on the subject and characters that grip you when you sit down to write. Otherwise, IMO, it will be forced.--Joan





        • Kris Jackson
          My two biggest problems are starting and stopping. I d rather do housework than start writing. But then I ll write until 2am. On a work night. --Kris Jackson
          Message 4 of 15 , Sep 1, 2009
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            My two biggest problems are starting and stopping. I'd rather do housework than start writing. But then I'll write until 2am. On a work night.

            --Kris Jackson
            Author of Above the Fray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps
            krisjacksondesign.com
            774-276-0116


            On Tue, 2009-09-01 at 09:46 -0700, Celia Hayes wrote:
             
            I kind of agree with Kris - you can't stick around until you are inspired. Writing is your job, you should think of it as what you do for a living. Personally, I find deadlines very inspiring, even self-imposed ones.

            Celia Hayes
            Author: "To Truckee's Trail"  & "The Adelsverein Trilogy"
            Independent Authors' Guild Website Drudge www.celiahayes.com Celia Hayes at Author's Den

            --- On Tue, 9/1/09, Kris Jackson <kris@...> wrote:

            From: Kris Jackson <kris@...>
            Subject: Re: [IAG-members] Re: my next novel
            To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 11:42 AM

             
            Joan, that's an interesting subject. Should you only work when you're "inspired"? A lot of people would say yes. But I have worked as a cartoonist on a daily strip, and also made a living selling paintings. That means working when you're not inspired. Then you have to just suck it up and do it anyway. Sometimes that's reflected in the work. Sometimes you fake being inspired and manage to do something worthwhile anyway.

            The ideal thing would be to be inspired all the time. I think I've mentioned Stephen King once described his muse as kind of looking like Jack Webb saying "Get to work." The guy has made more money than he could ever spend, but he still has to sit there and pound the keys every day. The only day he doesn't write, he says, is July 4th.

            I've started the Great Flood story, tentatively titled "In the Year of the Water." It's a subject that's interested me since I heard it in Sunday School and imagined all the poor people fleeing to higher ground, just to have the world swallowed up by water anyway. I just wrote something describing someone looking down into the water and seeing trees as far down as they can see. No, the story didn't grip me as hard as the Antietam story, and I've already developed those two main characters, and I've sort of found my Nineteenth-Century voice from the other book. But now I'm looking down through the water at those treetops, and they're fading as the water gets deeper, and I like what I see.

            --Kris Jackson
            Author of Above the Fray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps
            krisjacksondesign. com
            774-276-0116


            On Tue, 2009-09-01 at 07:22 +0000, joanszechtman wrote:


             
            Kris, like most here, I'd also lean towards the third choice. *But* despite that, I think you should work on the subject and characters that grip you when you sit down to write. Otherwise, IMO, it will be forced.--Joan









          • janetelaine smith
            I find that I write much better when I have a deadline looming. With my magazine work it is imposed by multiple bosses (who all seem to yell at me at the same
            Message 5 of 15 , Sep 1, 2009
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              I find that I write much better when I have a deadline looming. With my magazine work it is imposed by multiple bosses (who all seem to yell at me at the same time), but with my book writing, I really have to give myself a self-imposed deadline to keep me on track. It is too easy for me to procrastinate (I call it "being busy"--LOL!) if I don't do that.
              Janet

               
               
              Start your New Year with news from JES here 
              Check out videos here
              Love is in the air! Check it out  here
              All new: Hi, Daddy! See it on Amazon.com
               


              --- On Tue, 9/1/09, Kris Jackson <kris@...> wrote:

              From: Kris Jackson <kris@...>
              Subject: Re: [IAG-members] Re: my next novel
              To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 11:42 AM



              Joan, that's an interesting subject. Should you only work when you're "inspired"? A lot of people would say yes. But I have worked as a cartoonist on a daily strip, and also made a living selling paintings. That means working when you're not inspired. Then you have to just suck it up and do it anyway. Sometimes that's reflected in the work. Sometimes you fake being inspired and manage to do something worthwhile anyway.

              The ideal thing would be to be inspired all the time. I think I've mentioned Stephen King once described his muse as kind of looking like Jack Webb saying "Get to work." The guy has made more money than he could ever spend, but he still has to sit there and pound the keys every day. The only day he doesn't write, he says, is July 4th.

              I've started the Great Flood story, tentatively titled "In the Year of the Water." It's a subject that's interested me since I heard it in Sunday School and imagined all the poor people fleeing to higher ground, just to have the world swallowed up by water anyway. I just wrote something describing someone looking down into the water and seeing trees as far down as they can see. No, the story didn't grip me as hard as the Antietam story, and I've already developed those two main characters, and I've sort of found my Nineteenth-Century voice from the other book. But now I'm looking down through the water at those treetops, and they're fading as the water gets deeper, and I like what I see.

              --Kris Jackson
              Author of Above the Fray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps
              krisjacksondesign.com
              774-276-0116


              On Tue, 2009-09-01 at 07:22 +0000, joanszechtman wrote:
               
              Kris, like most here, I'd also lean towards the third choice. *But* despite that, I think you should work on the subject and characters that grip you when you sit down to write. Otherwise, IMO, it will be forced.--Joan







            • Kris Jackson
              Being busy. Yeah. Well, vacuuming the floor is important, too. I keep telling myself that, anyway. --Kris Jackson Author of Above the Fray, a Novel of the
              Message 6 of 15 , Sep 1, 2009
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                "Being busy." Yeah. Well, vacuuming the floor is important, too. I keep telling myself that, anyway.

                --Kris Jackson
                Author of Above the Fray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps
                krisjacksondesign.com
                774-276-0116


                On Tue, 2009-09-01 at 10:12 -0700, janetelaine smith wrote:
                 
                I find that I write much better when I have a deadline looming. With my magazine work it is imposed by multiple bosses (who all seem to yell at me at the same time), but with my book writing, I really have to give myself a self-imposed deadline to keep me on track. It is too easy for me to procrastinate (I call it "being busy"--LOL!) if I don't do that. Janet


                    Start your New Year with news from JES here  Check out videos here Love is in the air! Check it out  here All new: Hi, Daddy! See it on Amazon.com  

                --- On Tue, 9/1/09, Kris Jackson <kris@...> wrote:

                From: Kris Jackson <kris@...>
                Subject: Re: [IAG-members] Re: my next novel
                To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 11:42 AM



                Joan, that's an interesting subject. Should you only work when you're "inspired"? A lot of people would say yes. But I have worked as a cartoonist on a daily strip, and also made a living selling paintings. That means working when you're not inspired. Then you have to just suck it up and do it anyway. Sometimes that's reflected in the work. Sometimes you fake being inspired and manage to do something worthwhile anyway.

                The ideal thing would be to be inspired all the time. I think I've mentioned Stephen King once described his muse as kind of looking like Jack Webb saying "Get to work." The guy has made more money than he could ever spend, but he still has to sit there and pound the keys every day. The only day he doesn't write, he says, is July 4th.

                I've started the Great Flood story, tentatively titled "In the Year of the Water." It's a subject that's interested me since I heard it in Sunday School and imagined all the poor people fleeing to higher ground, just to have the world swallowed up by water anyway. I just wrote something describing someone looking down into the water and seeing trees as far down as they can see. No, the story didn't grip me as hard as the Antietam story, and I've already developed those two main characters, and I've sort of found my Nineteenth-Century voice from the other book. But now I'm looking down through the water at those treetops, and they're fading as the water gets deeper, and I like what I see.

                --Kris Jackson
                Author of Above the Fray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps
                krisjacksondesign.com
                774-276-0116


                On Tue, 2009-09-01 at 07:22 +0000, joanszechtman wrote:
                 
                Kris, like most here, I'd also lean towards the third choice. *But* despite that, I think you should work on the subject and characters that grip you when you sit down to write. Otherwise, IMO, it will be forced.--Joan











              • Peggy Ullman Bell
                I remember an article I read years ago in The Writer magazine. The title was Don t Clean the Refrigerator Peggy Jay www.peggyullmanbell.com What would you
                Message 7 of 15 , Sep 1, 2009
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                  I remember an article I read years ago in The Writer magazine. The title was "Don't Clean the Refrigerator"
                   
                  Peggy Jay
                   
                   
                  "What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?" anonymous



                  From: Kris Jackson <kris@...>
                  To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, September 1, 2009 1:16:23 PM
                  Subject: Re: [IAG-members] Re: my next novel

                   

                  "Being busy." Yeah. Well, vacuuming the floor is important, too. I keep telling myself that, anyway.


                  --Kris Jackson
                  Author of Above the Fray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps
                  krisjacksondesign. com
                  774-276-0116


                  On Tue, 2009-09-01 at 10:12 -0700, janetelaine smith wrote:

                   
                  I find that I write much better when I have a deadline looming. With my magazine work it is imposed by multiple bosses (who all seem to yell at me at the same time), but with my book writing, I really have to give myself a self-imposed deadline to keep me on track. It is too easy for me to procrastinate (I call it "being busy"--LOL!) if I don't do that. Janet


                      Start your New Year with news from JES here  Check out videos here Love is in the air! Check it out  here All new: Hi, Daddy! See it on Amazon.com  

                  --- On Tue, 9/1/09, Kris Jackson <kris@krisjacksondes ign.com> wrote:

                  From: Kris Jackson <kris@krisjacksondes ign.com>
                  Subject: Re: [IAG-members] Re: my next novel
                  To: IAG-members@ yahoogroups. com
                  Date: Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 11:42 AM



                  Joan, that's an interesting subject. Should you only work when you're "inspired"? A lot of people would say yes. But I have worked as a cartoonist on a daily strip, and also made a living selling paintings. That means working when you're not inspired. Then you have to just suck it up and do it anyway. Sometimes that's reflected in the work. Sometimes you fake being inspired and manage to do something worthwhile anyway.

                  The ideal thing would be to be inspired all the time. I think I've mentioned Stephen King once described his muse as kind of looking like Jack Webb saying "Get to work." The guy has made more money than he could ever spend, but he still has to sit there and pound the keys every day. The only day he doesn't write, he says, is July 4th.

                  I've started the Great Flood story, tentatively titled "In the Year of the Water." It's a subject that's interested me since I heard it in Sunday School and imagined all the poor people fleeing to higher ground, just to have the world swallowed up by water anyway. I just wrote something describing someone looking down into the water and seeing trees as far down as they can see. No, the story didn't grip me as hard as the Antietam story, and I've already developed those two main characters, and I've sort of found my Nineteenth-Century voice from the other book. But now I'm looking down through the water at those treetops, and they're fading as the water gets deeper, and I like what I see.

                  --Kris Jackson
                  Author of Above the Fray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps
                  krisjacksondesign.com
                  774-276-0116


                  On Tue, 2009-09-01 at 07:22 +0000, joanszechtman wrote:
                   
                  Kris, like most here, I'd also lean towards the third choice. *But* despite that, I think you should work on the subject and characters that grip you when you sit down to write. Otherwise, IMO, it will be forced.--Joan












                • joanszechtman
                  ... Excellent point, Kris. And as a general rule, I agree with you about the need to keep at it even if you re not inspired at the moment. *But* it seems to me
                  Message 8 of 15 , Sep 2, 2009
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                    Kris Jackson <kris@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Joan, that's an interesting subject. Should you only work when you're
                    > "inspired"? A lot of people would say yes. But I have worked as a
                    > cartoonist on a daily strip, and also made a living selling paintings.
                    > That means working when you're not inspired. Then you have to just suck
                    > it up and do it anyway. Sometimes that's reflected in the work.
                    > Sometimes you fake being inspired and manage to do something worthwhile
                    > anyway.

                    Excellent point, Kris. And as a general rule, I agree with you about the need to keep at it even if you're not inspired at the moment. *But* it seems to me that since you've mentioned four possibilities in the original post, and a fifth just now, that you are not lacking in ideas or inspiration. However, given your spate of ideas, I'm inclined to offer the same suggestion, that you back burner the four that are of lesser interest of the moment and work on the one that most holds your imagination, even though it doesn't mean that you won't hit dry spells that you'll have to work through.

                    In my case, I have to focus on the subject that is most interesting to me in order to have the stamina to work through the uninspired periods. The one thing I do is to make notes--brief or extensive--on other ideas for future projects.

                    Joan
                    ---
                    This Time, ISBN-13: 978-0-9824493-0-1
                    website: http://www.joanszechtman.com/
                    blog: http://rtoaaa.blogspot.com/
                  • mnrancher
                    This is interesting. I am sure that I am the laziest writer on this forum. I don t apologize for that, I just shortened my second book which was hatched in
                    Message 9 of 15 , Sep 2, 2009
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                      This is interesting. I am sure that I am the laziest writer on this forum. I don't apologize for that, I just shortened my second book which was hatched in forty days (to impress a girl) to one book every October and I've kept on track. My blocks aren't fatal. I usually just back up two chapters and my characters take up the weight of plot and dialogue. It makes it easy to write. I find the writing to be a lot easier than the selling. Who knew that writers would have to be their own salesmen?




                      --- In IAG-members@yahoogroups.com, Peggy Ullman Bell <cronejay@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I remember an article I read years ago in The Writer magazine. The title was "Don't Clean the Refrigerator"
                      >
                      >
                      > Peggy Jay
                      >
                      > www.peggyullmanbell.com
                      >
                      > "What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?" anonymous
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > From: Kris Jackson <kris@...>
                      > To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Tuesday, September 1, 2009 1:16:23 PM
                      > Subject: Re: [IAG-members] Re: my next novel
                      >
                      >
                      > "Being busy." Yeah. Well, vacuuming the floor is important, too. I keep telling myself that, anyway.
                      >
                      >
                      > --Kris Jackson
                      > Author of Above the Fray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps
                      > krisjacksondesign. com
                      > 774-276-0116
                      >
                      > On Tue, 2009-09-01 at 10:12 -0700, janetelaine smith wrote:
                      >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >I find that I write much better when I have a deadline looming. With my magazine work it is imposed by multiple bosses (who all seem to yell at me at the same time), but with my book writing, I really have to give myself a self-imposed deadline to keep me on track. It is too easy for me to procrastinate (I call it "being busy"--LOL!) if I don't do that.
                      > >Janet
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >>
                      > >
                      > >Start your New Year with news from JES here Check out videos here Love is in the air! Check it out here All new: Hi, Daddy!See it on Amazon.com >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >>--- On Tue, 9/1/09, Kris Jackson <kris@krisjacksondes ign.com> wrote:
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >>>> From: Kris Jackson <kris@krisjacksondes ign.com>
                      > >>>> Subject: Re: [IAG-members] Re: my next novel
                      > >>>> To: IAG-members@ yahoogroups. com
                      > >>>> Date: Tuesday, September 1, 2009, 11:42 AM
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >
                      > >>
                      > >>>> Joan, that's an interesting subject. Should you only work when you're "inspired"? A lot of people would say yes. But I have worked as a cartoonist on a daily strip, and also made a living selling paintings. That means working when you're not inspired. Then you have to just suck it up and do it anyway. Sometimes that's reflected in the work. Sometimes you fake being inspired and manage to do something worthwhile anyway.
                      > >>
                      > >>>> The ideal thing would be to be inspired all the time. I think I've mentioned Stephen King once described his muse as kind of looking like Jack Webb saying "Get to work." The guy has made more money than he could ever spend, but he still has to sit there and pound the keys every day. The only day he doesn't write, he says, is July 4th.
                      > >>
                      > >>>> I've started the Great Flood story, tentatively titled "In the Year of the Water." It's a subject that's interested me since I heard it in Sunday School and imagined all the poor people fleeing to higher ground, just to have the world swallowed up by water anyway. I just wrote something describing someone looking down into the water and seeing trees as far down as they can see. No, the story didn't grip me as hard as the Antietam story, and I've already developed those two main characters, and I've sort of found my Nineteenth-Century voice from the other book. But now I'm looking down through the water at those treetops, and they're fading as the water gets deeper, and I like what I see.
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>--Kris Jackson
                      > >>>>Author of Above the Fray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps
                      > >>krisjacksondesign.com
                      > >>>>774-276-0116
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >>>> On Tue, 2009-09-01 at 07:22 +0000, joanszechtman wrote:
                      > >>
                      > >>>>>
                      > >>>>>> Kris, like most here, I'd also lean towards the third choice. *But* despite that, I think you should work on the subject and characters that grip you when you sit down to write. Otherwise, IMO, it will be forced.--Joan
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>>
                      > >>
                      > >>
                      > >
                      > >>
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
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