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Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not

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  • winfried hundt
    Ladies and Gentlemen, thank you very much for your advice. Its nice to get a little boost by being told to be on the right road. Regards from Namibia W.A.Hundt
    Message 1 of 20 , Jul 1, 2012
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      Ladies and Gentlemen, thank you very much for your advice. Its nice to get a little boost by being told to be on the right road.

      Regards from Namibia

      W.A.Hundt


      From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
      To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, July 1, 2012 5:31 AM
      Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not

       
      Lloyd,
      I beg to differ. Kindle I believe outsells Nook, Sony and Ipad. Having thoseother  options as backupsthrough Smashwords, or a Blue Leaf conversion, isn't bad but giving Amazon the exclusive distribution opens the give-away factor, which isn't as good as it used to be but if you have a series it's nice to have 20,000 people grab copies of volume one. Whether the people who grab free books read them is another question, and now there are so many offered free that the thrill has worn off.

      Amazon is not even adequate at reporting physical book sales but is excellent at reporting Kindle sales. A friend bought several copies of one of my books at one minute past midnight on the first of a month -- the sale showed up for me two minutes later on my Kindle reports. Oh yes, one can give ebooks for the Kindle reading ap for free -- I do often. They can be delivered almost instantly to New Zealand!

      bestens
      Katherine

      On 6/30/2012 10:34 AM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:
       
      Publishing e-books

      It's easy.  Smashwords and Amazon both offer free downloaded information that will guide you through the process. There are other e-book distributors but these are the two giants.  The reason I meantion Smashwords is because they distribute to the most popular e-book brands such as Nook, Sony, iPad, etc.

      http://www.smashwords.com/about/how_to_publish_on_smashwords


      It costs nothing and both pay royalties after the first two months -- after that, both pay monthly but always two months later.  So if you published in January and sold e-books through both Amazon and Smashwords, they start paying your January royalties in March and so on.

      There is an option to have them automatically deposit your royalties into a bank account. However, I don't know about a foreign bank--maybe they would pay into a PayPal account.

      Sincerely,
      Lloyd Lofthouse
       


      --- On Sat, 6/30/12, werda555 <werda555@...> wrote:

      From: werda555 <werda555@...>
      Subject: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
      To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 12:31 AM

       
      Hi all, I selfpublished a text book of 512 pages in 1989. It has become a collectors item and has sold as such for 15 times its original price.
      I have working on the second edition amd like to publish it as an ebook, but I hear pro and cons all the time. I hear stories that google has been fixing prices and authors got very little money.
      2. I have a ISBn for the hard copy, can I use the same ISBN or must I get a new one for an ebook.

      3. Has anybody here published an ebook and how did he do it? Any pit falls getting paid via paypal. After all the work I put in, I do not want to make a strategig mistake.

      Anybody here writing crime stories, spy stories or detective stories? If you have techical questions about ballistics or weapons for a book you are writing I gladly help you. Common mistakes "switching the safety off or on on a revolver". Revolvers do not have a safety!!

      BTW I am not english speaking, please have some mercy when I make mistakes.

      Regards and Thanks



    • Lloyd Lofthouse
      Katherine, Of course, I agree, Amazon outsells everyone else in the marketplace when it comes to e-books.  More than 90% of my sales are through Amazon
      Message 2 of 20 , Jul 1, 2012
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        Katherine,

        Of course, I agree, Amazon outsells everyone else in the marketplace when it comes to e-books.  More than 90% of my sales are through Amazon Kindle.

        What I meant by "giant" was that Amazon and Smashwords are the best sources of distribution to more e-book readers.

        As far as I know, Kindle and Smashwords are the two most popular ways to sell books through other e-book readers such as Sony, iPad, Nook, etc.  I may be wrong, but the Barnes & Noble Nook, Sony, Kobi and iPad do not offer the applications that Amazon Kindle offers so people that own a Nook or iPad, laptop, ultrabook, desktop, tablet, smart phone, etc. may buy e-books through Amazon and read them on other devices other than a Kindle.

        Amazon Kindle has these applications on every e-book page on their site and they are free to download.

        Smashwords, on the other hand, has contracts with several other E-reader companies (but not Amazon Kindle) to convert e-books for e-readers such as the Sony, iPad and Nook.  Instead of dealing with each e-reader company one by one, publishing an e-book through Smashwords reaches most of the others offering a one stop shop for e-book publication.

        By publishing e-books through Smashwords and Amazon Kindle at the same time, the author reaches a wider audience than publishing with one only.

        The same business model works for tree books but with tree books, one ISBN is all that is necessary for the same title then the author may publish through Create Space and LSI at the same time to reach a wider potential audience for his or her work.

        Create Space does offer an option ($ - it isn't free and and it will cause the tree book to cost more) to distribute tree books to a wider market outside Amazon. 

        In June 2012, five tree books sold through LSI and 323 e-books through Amazon Kindle. I haven't checked my sales from Smashwords for June yet so there may have been a few more sales through that channel. Royalties from Smashwords are deposited to my PayPal account while Royalties through LSI and Amazon Kindle are paid into my bank-business account.


        Lloyd Lofthouse
         


        --- On Sat, 6/30/12, Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...> wrote:

        From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
        Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
        To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 9:31 PM

         

        Lloyd,
        I beg to differ. Kindle I believe outsells Nook, Sony and Ipad. Having thoseother  options as backupsthrough Smashwords, or a Blue Leaf conversion, isn't bad but giving Amazon the exclusive distribution opens the give-away factor, which isn't as good as it used to be but if you have a series it's nice to have 20,000 people grab copies of volume one. Whether the people who grab free books read them is another question, and now there are so many offered free that the thrill has worn off.

        Amazon is not even adequate at reporting physical book sales but is excellent at reporting Kindle sales. A friend bought several copies of one of my books at one minute past midnight on the first of a month -- the sale showed up for me two minutes later on my Kindle reports. Oh yes, one can give ebooks for the Kindle reading ap for free -- I do often. They can be delivered almost instantly to New Zealand!

        bestens
        Katherine

        On 6/30/2012 10:34 AM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:

         

        Publishing e-books

        It's easy.  Smashwords and Amazon both offer free downloaded information that will guide you through the process. There are other e-book distributors but these are the two giants.  The reason I meantion Smashwords is because they distribute to the most popular e-book brands such as Nook, Sony, iPad, etc.



        It costs nothing and both pay royalties after the first two months -- after that, both pay monthly but always two months later.  So if you published in January and sold e-books through both Amazon and Smashwords, they start paying your January royalties in March and so on.

        There is an option to have them automatically deposit your royalties into a bank account. However, I don't know about a foreign bank--maybe they would pay into a PayPal account.

        Sincerely,
        Lloyd Lofthouse
         


        --- On Sat, 6/30/12, werda555 <werda555@...> wrote:

        From: werda555 <werda555@...>
        Subject: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
        To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 12:31 AM

         

        Hi all, I selfpublished a text book of 512 pages in 1989. It has become a collectors item and has sold as such for 15 times its original price.
        I have working on the second edition amd like to publish it as an ebook, but I hear pro and cons all the time. I hear stories that google has been fixing prices and authors got very little money.
        2. I have a ISBn for the hard copy, can I use the same ISBN or must I get a new one for an ebook.

        3. Has anybody here published an ebook and how did he do it? Any pit falls getting paid via paypal. After all the work I put in, I do not want to make a strategig mistake.

        Anybody here writing crime stories, spy stories or detective stories? If you have techical questions about ballistics or weapons for a book you are writing I gladly help you. Common mistakes "switching the safety off or on on a revolver". Revolvers do not have a safety!!

        BTW I am not english speaking, please have some mercy when I make mistakes.

        Regards and Thanks

      • Chester Campbell
        Regarding Katherine s statement Whether the people who grab free books read them is another question, I had about 500 people download a free book and nobody
        Message 3 of 20 , Jul 2, 2012
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          Regarding Katherine's statement "Whether the people who grab free books read them is another question," I had about 500 people download a free book and nobody has put up a review. I'm wondering if they all ended up in Kindle limbo.
           
           
          Chester Campbell
          Beware the Jabberwock, an international thriller
          Available for the Kindle $3.99
           

        • Lloyd Lofthouse
          Chester,   How long ago was that?   For example, I have a stack of books to read (tree and e-books) and it may take months to get to them all.  I m feeling
          Message 4 of 20 , Jul 2, 2012
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            Chester,
             
            How long ago was that?
             
            For example, I have a stack of books to read (tree and e-books) and it may take months to get to them all.  I'm feeling a bit guilty because I overbooked myself.
             
            If I give up my writing to read faster, then I'll feel guilty about not writing.  LOL
             
            Can't win.

            Lloyd Lofthouse
             


            --- On Mon, 7/2/12, Chester Campbell <campbellcd@...> wrote:

            From: Chester Campbell <campbellcd@...>
            Subject: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
            To: iag-members@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, July 2, 2012, 9:46 AM

             
            Regarding Katherine's statement "Whether the people who grab free books read them is another question," I had about 500 people download a free book and nobody has put up a review. I'm wondering if they all ended up in Kindle limbo.
             
             
            Chester Campbell
            Beware the Jabberwock, an international thriller
            Available for the Kindle $3.99
             
          • Chester Campbell
            It was the end of April, Lloyd, so it has been two months. I guess I expect people to read faster, which isn t realistic since I m such a slow reader myself.
            Message 5 of 20 , Jul 2, 2012
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              It was the end of April, Lloyd, so it has been two months. I guess I expect people to read faster, which isn't realistic since I'm such a slow reader myself.
               
              Chester Campbell
              Beware the Jabberwock, an international thriller
              Available for the Kindle $3.99
            • Lloyd Lofthouse
              I suspect readers read faster than writers.  LOL Lloyd Lofthouse iLook China My Splendid Concubine Our Hart, Elegy for a Concubine    ... From: Chester
              Message 6 of 20 , Jul 2, 2012
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                I suspect readers read faster than writers.  LOL

                Lloyd Lofthouse
                 


                --- On Mon, 7/2/12, Chester Campbell <campbellcd@...> wrote:

                From: Chester Campbell <campbellcd@...>
                Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, July 2, 2012, 3:08 PM

                 
                It was the end of April, Lloyd, so it has been two months. I guess I expect people to read faster, which isn't realistic since I'm such a slow reader myself.
                 
                Chester Campbell
                Beware the Jabberwock, an international thriller
                Available for the Kindle $3.99
              • janetelaine smith
                And for the most part they aren t as critical either. Still, we learn by what s bad as well as what s good. Janet Keith Trilogy now at Omnilit.com Keith
                Message 7 of 20 , Jul 2, 2012
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                  And for the most part they aren't as critical either. Still, we learn by what's bad as well as what's good.
                  Janet
                   
                  Keith Trilogy now at Omnilit.com
                  Keith Trilogy in Kindle now 
                  Travel with JES to Venezuela and back here ;
                  Just click on the cover of Rebel With a Cause
                  Check out videos here
                   
                   
                   

                  From: Lloyd Lofthouse <lflwriter@...>
                  To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, July 2, 2012 7:42 PM
                  Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                  I suspect readers read faster than writers.  LOL

                  Lloyd Lofthouse
                   


                  --- On Mon, 7/2/12, Chester Campbell <campbellcd@...> wrote:

                  From: Chester Campbell <campbellcd@...>
                  Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                  To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Monday, July 2, 2012, 3:08 PM

                   
                  It was the end of April, Lloyd, so it has been two months. I guess I expect people to read faster, which isn't realistic since I'm such a slow reader myself.
                   
                  Chester Campbell
                  Beware the Jabberwock, an international thriller
                  Available for the Kindle $3.99
                  Mystery Mania Blog: http://chestercampbell.blogspot.com/
                  http://www.chesterdcampbell.com/
                • bitterroottrapper
                  My first free eBook download was The Devil in the Bottle by Carol Buchanan. It was a wonderful book, and I wrote a review for Amazon.com. She had announced
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jul 3, 2012
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                    My first free eBook download was "The Devil in the Bottle" by Carol Buchanan. It was a wonderful book, and I wrote a review for Amazon.com. She had announced that it would be free for a short time and I pounced on it. I also pounced on another one that she announced would be free for a short time. I will write a review on that as well, because it too was excellent.

                    My next eBook purchase will be from Carol Buchanan, and I will gladyly pay for it. Her free offerings were a great introduction.

                    Like everyone else, I am slowly experimenting with eBooks, simply because my library shelves are two deep and I have room for no more. I'm going to have to restrict new purchases to signed copies only.

                    That is one thing with an eBook that you will NEVER be able to get.

                    --- In IAG-members@yahoogroups.com, "Chester Campbell" <campbellcd@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Regarding Katherine's statement "Whether the people who grab free books read them is another question," I had about 500 people download a free book and nobody has put up a review. I'm wondering if they all ended up in Kindle limbo.
                    >
                    >
                    > Chester Campbell
                    > Beware the Jabberwock, an international thriller
                    > Available for the Kindle $3.99
                    > Mystery Mania Blog: http://chestercampbell.blogspot.com
                    > http://www.chesterdcampbell.com
                    >
                  • joanszechtman
                    Actually, I just learned that you can get a signed ebook copy on B&N s Nook. This is probably because they have physical stores and have book signings and
                    Message 9 of 20 , Jul 3, 2012
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                      Actually, I just learned that you can get a signed ebook copy on B&N's Nook. This is probably because they have physical stores and have book signings and their Nook business is important.

                      I've come to prefer ebooks for space reasons and eliminating having to build a wing on my house to accommodate all the books I'll end up buying. I'm overflowing as it is. I also like to search electronically and find I'm better off with an electronic version for my reference books. As a writer, I can do better with an ebook.

                      Joan
                      ---
                      This Time--General Fiction Finalist of 2010 Next Generation Indie Book Awards
                      Loyalty Binds Me--recommended by Midwest Book reviews
                      website -- blog --trailer
                      ebooks at Smashwords

                      --- In IAG-members@yahoogroups.com, "bitterroottrapper" <dayvellen@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > My first free eBook download was "The Devil in the Bottle" by Carol Buchanan. It was a wonderful book, and I wrote a review for Amazon.com. She had announced that it would be free for a short time and I pounced on it. I also pounced on another one that she announced would be free for a short time. I will write a review on that as well, because it too was excellent.
                      >
                      > My next eBook purchase will be from Carol Buchanan, and I will gladyly pay for it. Her free offerings were a great introduction.
                      >
                      > Like everyone else, I am slowly experimenting with eBooks, simply because my library shelves are two deep and I have room for no more. I'm going to have to restrict new purchases to signed copies only.
                      >
                      > That is one thing with an eBook that you will NEVER be able to get.
                      >
                      > --- In IAG-members@yahoogroups.com, "Chester Campbell" campbellcd@ wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Regarding Katherine's statement "Whether the people who grab free books read them is another question," I had about 500 people download a free book and nobody has put up a review. I'm wondering if they all ended up in Kindle limbo.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Chester Campbell
                      > > Beware the Jabberwock, an international thriller
                      > > Available for the Kindle $3.99
                      > > Mystery Mania Blog: http://chestercampbell.blogspot.com
                      > > http://www.chesterdcampbell.com
                      > >
                      >
                    • Katherine Ashe
                      Lloyd, The contract at Smashwords put me off, so I published with Createspace and had Blue Leaf do the conversion to all other ebook formats. I was very happy
                      Message 10 of 20 , Jul 4, 2012
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                        Lloyd,
                        The contract at Smashwords put me off, so I published with Createspace and had Blue Leaf do the conversion to all other ebook formats.

                        I was very happy with the professionality of the Createspace design staff. Before publishing, I showed their work to my friends at Viking/Penguin and Knopf. They had to admit that Createspace's work was at their own companies' standards of professionalism and the physical books were "state of the art"  - in fact Createspace uses the same company (Ingram) Viking/Penguin uses.

                        Lloyd, I have a question about China. I'm reading David Graeber's book "5000 years of Debt." He seems to be saying that peasant revolutions in China were commonplace, unlike in any other country. He claims (Kindle location 9689) "234,185 insurrections in China, averaging 43 events per day, or 1.8 outbreaks per hour (Deng 1999.220). 22. Following  Deng (1999).

                        This sounds to me like revisionist history to "normalize" the suffering inflicted during Mao's revolution for a generation that may now be asking why grandpa and grandma suffered so. What's going on? What's being counted as "insurrection"?

                        Bestens
                        Katherine




                        On 7/1/2012 10:59 AM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:  
                        Katherine,

                        Of course, I agree, Amazon outsells everyone else in the marketplace when it comes to e-books.  More than 90% of my sales are through Amazon Kindle.

                        What I meant by "giant" was that Amazon and Smashwords are the best sources of distribution to more e-book readers.

                        As far as I know, Kindle and Smashwords are the two most popular ways to sell books through other e-book readers such as Sony, iPad, Nook, etc.  I may be wrong, but the Barnes & Noble Nook, Sony, Kobi and iPad do not offer the applications that Amazon Kindle offers so people that own a Nook or iPad, laptop, ultrabook, desktop, tablet, smart phone, etc. may buy e-books through Amazon and read them on other devices other than a Kindle.

                        Amazon Kindle has these applications on every e-book page on their site and they are free to download.

                        Smashwords, on the other hand, has contracts with several other E-reader companies (but not Amazon Kindle) to convert e-books for e-readers such as the Sony, iPad and Nook.  Instead of dealing with each e-reader company one by one, publishing an e-book through Smashwords reaches most of the others offering a one stop shop for e-book publication.

                        By publishing e-books through Smashwords and Amazon Kindle at the same time, the author reaches a wider audience than publishing with one only.

                        The same business model works for tree books but with tree books, one ISBN is all that is necessary for the same title then the author may publish through Create Space and LSI at the same time to reach a wider potential audience for his or her work.

                        Create Space does offer an option ($ - it isn't free and and it will cause the tree book to cost more) to distribute tree books to a wider market outside Amazon. 

                        In June 2012, five tree books sold through LSI and 323 e-books through Amazon Kindle. I haven't checked my sales from Smashwords for June yet so there may have been a few more sales through that channel. Royalties from Smashwords are deposited to my PayPal account while Royalties through LSI and Amazon Kindle are paid into my bank-business account.


                        Lloyd Lofthouse
                         


                        --- On Sat, 6/30/12, Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...> wrote:

                        From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
                        Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                        To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 9:31 PM

                         

                        Lloyd,
                        I beg to differ. Kindle I believe outsells Nook, Sony and Ipad. Having thoseother  options as backupsthrough Smashwords, or a Blue Leaf conversion, isn't bad but giving Amazon the exclusive distribution opens the give-away factor, which isn't as good as it used to be but if you have a series it's nice to have 20,000 people grab copies of volume one. Whether the people who grab free books read them is another question, and now there are so many offered free that the thrill has worn off.

                        Amazon is not even adequate at reporting physical book sales but is excellent at reporting Kindle sales. A friend bought several copies of one of my books at one minute past midnight on the first of a month -- the sale showed up for me two minutes later on my Kindle reports. Oh yes, one can give ebooks for the Kindle reading ap for free -- I do often. They can be delivered almost instantly to New Zealand!

                        bestens
                        Katherine

                        On 6/30/2012 10:34 AM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:

                         

                        Publishing e-books

                        It's easy.  Smashwords and Amazon both offer free downloaded information that will guide you through the process. There are other e-book distributors but these are the two giants.  The reason I meantion Smashwords is because they distribute to the most popular e-book brands such as Nook, Sony, iPad, etc.



                        It costs nothing and both pay royalties after the first two months -- after that, both pay monthly but always two months later.  So if you published in January and sold e-books through both Amazon and Smashwords, they start paying your January royalties in March and so on.

                        There is an option to have them automatically deposit your royalties into a bank account. However, I don't know about a foreign bank--maybe they would pay into a PayPal account.

                        Sincerely,
                        Lloyd Lofthouse
                         


                        --- On Sat, 6/30/12, werda555 <werda555@...> wrote:

                        From: werda555 <werda555@...>
                        Subject: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                        To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 12:31 AM

                         

                        Hi all, I selfpublished a text book of 512 pages in 1989. It has become a collectors item and has sold as such for 15 times its original price.
                        I have working on the second edition amd like to publish it as an ebook, but I hear pro and cons all the time. I hear stories that google has been fixing prices and authors got very little money.
                        2. I have a ISBn for the hard copy, can I use the same ISBN or must I get a new one for an ebook.

                        3. Has anybody here published an ebook and how did he do it? Any pit falls getting paid via paypal. After all the work I put in, I do not want to make a strategig mistake.

                        Anybody here writing crime stories, spy stories or detective stories? If you have techical questions about ballistics or weapons for a book you are writing I gladly help you. Common mistakes "switching the safety off or on on a revolver". Revolvers do not have a safety!!

                        BTW I am not english speaking, please have some mercy when I make mistakes.

                        Regards and Thanks

                      • Lloyd Lofthouse
                        Katherine,   He claims (Kindle location 9689) 234,185 insurrections in China, averaging 43 events per day, or 1.8 outbreaks per hour (Deng 1999.220). 22.
                        Message 11 of 20 , Jul 4, 2012
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                          Katherine,
                           
                          "He claims (Kindle location 9689) "234,185 insurrections in China, averaging 43 events per day, or 1.8 outbreaks per hour (Deng 1999.220). 22. Following Deng (1999)."
                           
                          I read an article on this topic about where those facts come from and how they were misinterpreted to become anything anyone wanted them to mean.
                           
                          The Chinese (local) police are required to report every disturbance of two or more people to the central authorities on regular annual reports but there are no detailed explanations of what each disturbance was.  A disturbance (what so called experts in the West claim are insurrections) could simply be two drunken men having an argument or a husband beating up his wife's lover.  All disturbances of this type are reported with the same language that may be translated (often wrong) into English and as insurrection or riot.
                           
                          In 2008, there was a surge of disturbances throughout China at the same time that the US caused global financial crises swept the world causing millions to lose their jobs.  I have read that at least nine-million workers lost jobs in the US and in China, that number was more than 20-million suddenly out of work and angry to see their dreams trashed.
                           
                          It is understood that many people in China would be upset about losing their jobs as they see their employers go out of business.  In fact, thousands of private businesses that relied on exporting to the United States closed their doors. 
                           
                          To deal with this, China ordered state-run industries to hire people that were out of work but there was a time lag before this happened.  The CCP also sent millions of Chinese unemployed back to their rural villages with a meager unemployment check to help them avoid starvation. Since rural Chinese pay no rent, mortgage or property tax for most rural homes, it takes very little to live on in rural China. The cost of living in urban China is much higher.
                           
                          I asked Tom Carter, the author of China: Portrait of a People about this and he replied that he never saw or heard of any evidence of an "insurrection" during the two years he spent visiting every nook and cranny of every province in China mostly on foot while he was mixing with the people.  He even walked to Tibet where some Tibetan peasants took him in when a blizzard hit and almost froze him. He lived with those Tibetans for a week or so before he moved on.  He had only good things to say about how he was treated by most of the people he met in China.
                           
                          However, he was involved in an incident with a few Chinese drunks smoking cigarettes on the non-smoking floor of a hotel he stayed in during his two-year trek.  When he complained to the smokers, he was knocked down and ended up in the police station where he gave a report and was given advice by the police of his rights before they released him.  He wrote about that in a guest post for my Blog.  I'm sure that incident was added to all the other so-called "insurrections" that some claim took place in China.
                           
                          Tom wrote a post about Crime in China. Tom went to China several years ago to teach ESL.  A few years later, he hit the road for two years. He has lived in both rural and urban China, then a few months ago he married his Chinese girlfriend, and they are now expecting a child. Tom is teaching ESL again in Shanghai to support his new growing family.
                           
                           
                          I have discovered that China's Western critics often take anything they can from China and twist it to make the CCP look bad.  However, China's state owned media publically report the facts used in these negative reports of China. What Western critics of China do with this information is often a crime.
                           
                           
                          What is really amazing are the Western claims that Mao and the Party deliberately caused the deaths of 3.75-million or 16-million or 20-million or 30-million or 45 million or 60 million Chinese (depending on what Western author you read or talk show host you listen to) during a famine that hit several of China's provinces during what was called the Great Leap Forward (1959 - 1961).  All of these claims are based on the same sketchy, incomplete facts that were released by China's Communist Government in the 1980s. One so called reputable Western author used this excuse to double the figures another author claimed in her book.  He said that since we couldn't trust the Chinese Communists, he doubled all of the previous figures by this other author that inflated her claims from some other Western author.
                           
                          As the years go by, the claims of deaths from that famine grow by leaps and bounds. None of these Western authors or talk show hosts ever mentions that the US had a complete embargo on China and refused to supply China with wheat in 1960/61, when the CCP asked for help.  However, Canada and France broke ranks with the US embargo and helped out probably saving millions from starvation.
                           
                          Most of the time, if one knows where to look and dig for info, he or she will find out most of these claims are bogus and/or not as they appear.
                           
                          In addition, China is changing at such a rapid pace with rural villages being moved to make way for factories, roads, expressways, rail, etc., that there has been unrest by rural Chinese due to these changes but the work "insurrection" is by far very misleading.  Many of these types of disturbances and/or protests originate due to economic corruption at the local level where local government officials take advantage of all the money being used to modernize China and sikim some off the top.  When rumors of this type of corruption and graft spreads among the people, there are often protests both on Chinese Blogs and in physical protests to higher ranked government officials in Beijing.  Many of the people still trust the central government but believe that many in the lower ranks are crooks and the people hate that so they protest to gain attention of those at the top that do not know everything that is going on at the bottom. 
                           
                          The CCP has 80 million Party members spread out across China that has a total population of more than 1.3 billion in a country about the size of the United States.
                             
                          Lloyd Lofthouse
                           


                          --- On Wed, 7/4/12, Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...> wrote:

                          From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
                          Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                          To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Wednesday, July 4, 2012, 5:40 AM

                           
                          Lloyd,
                          The contract at Smashwords put me off, so I published with Createspace and had Blue Leaf do the conversion to all other ebook formats.

                          I was very happy with the professionality of the Createspace design staff. Before publishing, I showed their work to my friends at Viking/Penguin and Knopf. They had to admit that Createspace's work was at their own companies' standards of professionalism and the physical books were "state of the art"  - in fact Createspace uses the same company (Ingram) Viking/Penguin uses.

                          Lloyd, I have a question about China. I'm reading David Graeber's book "5000 years of Debt." He seems to be saying that peasant revolutions in China were commonplace, unlike in any other country. He claims (Kindle location 9689) "234,185 insurrections in China, averaging 43 events per day, or 1.8 outbreaks per hour (Deng 1999.220). 22. Following  Deng (1999).

                          This sounds to me like revisionist history to "normalize" the suffering inflicted during Mao's revolution for a generation that may now be asking why grandpa and grandma suffered so. What's going on? What's being counted as "insurrection"?

                          Bestens
                          Katherine




                          On 7/1/2012 10:59 AM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:
                           
                          Katherine,

                          Of course, I agree, Amazon outsells everyone else in the marketplace when it comes to e-books.  More than 90% of my sales are through Amazon Kindle.

                          What I meant by "giant" was that Amazon and Smashwords are the best sources of distribution to more e-book readers.

                          As far as I know, Kindle and Smashwords are the two most popular ways to sell books through other e-book readers such as Sony, iPad, Nook, etc.  I may be wrong, but the Barnes & Noble Nook, Sony, Kobi and iPad do not offer the applications that Amazon Kindle offers so people that own a Nook or iPad, laptop, ultrabook, desktop, tablet, smart phone, etc. may buy e-books through Amazon and read them on other devices other than a Kindle.

                          Amazon Kindle has these applications on every e-book page on their site and they are free to download.

                          Smashwords, on the other hand, has contracts with several other E-reader companies (but not Amazon Kindle) to convert e-books for e-readers such as the Sony, iPad and Nook.  Instead of dealing with each e-reader company one by one, publishing an e-book through Smashwords reaches most of the others offering a one stop shop for e-book publication.

                          By publishing e-books through Smashwords and Amazon Kindle at the same time, the author reaches a wider audience than publishing with one only.

                          The same business model works for tree books but with tree books, one ISBN is all that is necessary for the same title then the author may publish through Create Space and LSI at the same time to reach a wider potential audience for his or her work.

                          Create Space does offer an option ($ - it isn't free and and it will cause the tree book to cost more) to distribute tree books to a wider market outside Amazon. 

                          In June 2012, five tree books sold through LSI and 323 e-books through Amazon Kindle. I haven't checked my sales from Smashwords for June yet so there may have been a few more sales through that channel. Royalties from Smashwords are deposited to my PayPal account while Royalties through LSI and Amazon Kindle are paid into my bank-business account.


                          Lloyd Lofthouse
                           


                          --- On Sat, 6/30/12, Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...> wrote:

                          From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
                          Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                          To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 9:31 PM

                           
                          Lloyd,
                          I beg to differ. Kindle I believe outsells Nook, Sony and Ipad. Having thoseother  options as backupsthrough Smashwords, or a Blue Leaf conversion, isn't bad but giving Amazon the exclusive distribution opens the give-away factor, which isn't as good as it used to be but if you have a series it's nice to have 20,000 people grab copies of volume one. Whether the people who grab free books read them is another question, and now there are so many offered free that the thrill has worn off.

                          Amazon is not even adequate at reporting physical book sales but is excellent at reporting Kindle sales. A friend bought several copies of one of my books at one minute past midnight on the first of a month -- the sale showed up for me two minutes later on my Kindle reports. Oh yes, one can give ebooks for the Kindle reading ap for free -- I do often. They can be delivered almost instantly to New Zealand!

                          bestens
                          Katherine

                          On 6/30/2012 10:34 AM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:
                           
                          Publishing e-books

                          It's easy.  Smashwords and Amazon both offer free downloaded information that will guide you through the process. There are other e-book distributors but these are the two giants.  The reason I meantion Smashwords is because they distribute to the most popular e-book brands such as Nook, Sony, iPad, etc.



                          It costs nothing and both pay royalties after the first two months -- after that, both pay monthly but always two months later.  So if you published in January and sold e-books through both Amazon and Smashwords, they start paying your January royalties in March and so on.

                          There is an option to have them automatically deposit your royalties into a bank account. However, I don't know about a foreign bank--maybe they would pay into a PayPal account.

                          Sincerely,
                          Lloyd Lofthouse
                           


                          --- On Sat, 6/30/12, werda555 <werda555@...> wrote:

                          From: werda555 <werda555@...>
                          Subject: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                          To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 12:31 AM

                           
                          Hi all, I selfpublished a text book of 512 pages in 1989. It has become a collectors item and has sold as such for 15 times its original price.
                          I have working on the second edition amd like to publish it as an ebook, but I hear pro and cons all the time. I hear stories that google has been fixing prices and authors got very little money.
                          2. I have a ISBn for the hard copy, can I use the same ISBN or must I get a new one for an ebook.

                          3. Has anybody here published an ebook and how did he do it? Any pit falls getting paid via paypal. After all the work I put in, I do not want to make a strategig mistake.

                          Anybody here writing crime stories, spy stories or detective stories? If you have techical questions about ballistics or weapons for a book you are writing I gladly help you. Common mistakes "switching the safety off or on on a revolver". Revolvers do not have a safety!!

                          BTW I am not english speaking, please have some mercy when I make mistakes.

                          Regards and Thanks

                        • Katherine Ashe
                          Lloyd, I m so glad I know you -- you were the perfect person to ask! I very much favor looking on every piece of information with the question -- what is the
                          Message 12 of 20 , Jul 4, 2012
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Lloyd,
                            I'm so glad I know you -- you were the perfect person to ask!

                            I very much favor looking on every piece of information with the question -- what is the objective of the writer? Graeber's work is fascinating, but skewed. As indeed is everything -- but knowing which way the skewing goes is essential.

                            Thank you!
                            Kagtherine

                            On 7/4/2012 4:09 PM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:  

                            Katherine,
                             
                            "He claims (Kindle location 9689) "234,185 insurrections in China, averaging 43 events per day, or 1.8 outbreaks per hour (Deng 1999.220). 22. Following Deng (1999)."
                             
                            I read an article on this topic about where those facts come from and how they were misinterpreted to become anything anyone wanted them to mean.
                             
                            The Chinese (local) police are required to report every disturbance of two or more people to the central authorities on regular annual reports but there are no detailed explanations of what each disturbance was.  A disturbance (what so called experts in the West claim are insurrections) could simply be two drunken men having an argument or a husband beating up his wife's lover.  All disturbances of this type are reported with the same language that may be translated (often wrong) into English and as insurrection or riot.
                             
                            In 2008, there was a surge of disturbances throughout China at the same time that the US caused global financial crises swept the world causing millions to lose their jobs.  I have read that at least nine-million workers lost jobs in the US and in China, that number was more than 20-million suddenly out of work and angry to see their dreams trashed.
                             
                            It is understood that many people in China would be upset about losing their jobs as they see their employers go out of business.  In fact, thousands of private businesses that relied on exporting to the United States closed their doors. 
                             
                            To deal with this, China ordered state-run industries to hire people that were out of work but there was a time lag before this happened.  The CCP also sent millions of Chinese unemployed back to their rural villages with a meager unemployment check to help them avoid starvation. Since rural Chinese pay no rent, mortgage or property tax for most rural homes, it takes very little to live on in rural China. The cost of living in urban China is much higher.
                             
                            I asked Tom Carter, the author of China: Portrait of a People about this and he replied that he never saw or heard of any evidence of an "insurrection" during the two years he spent visiting every nook and cranny of every province in China mostly on foot while he was mixing with the people.  He even walked to Tibet where some Tibetan peasants took him in when a blizzard hit and almost froze him. He lived with those Tibetans for a week or so before he moved on.  He had only good things to say about how he was treated by most of the people he met in China.
                             
                            However, he was involved in an incident with a few Chinese drunks smoking cigarettes on the non-smoking floor of a hotel he stayed in during his two-year trek.  When he complained to the smokers, he was knocked down and ended up in the police station where he gave a report and was given advice by the police of his rights before they released him.  He wrote about that in a guest post for my Blog.  I'm sure that incident was added to all the other so-called "insurrections" that some claim took place in China.
                             
                            Tom wrote a post about Crime in China. Tom went to China several years ago to teach ESL.  A few years later, he hit the road for two years. He has lived in both rural and urban China, then a few months ago he married his Chinese girlfriend, and they are now expecting a child. Tom is teaching ESL again in Shanghai to support his new growing family.
                             
                             
                            I have discovered that China's Western critics often take anything they can from China and twist it to make the CCP look bad.  However, China's state owned media publically report the facts used in these negative reports of China. What Western critics of China do with this information is often a crime.
                             
                             
                            What is really amazing are the Western claims that Mao and the Party deliberately caused the deaths of 3.75-million or 16-million or 20-million or 30-million or 45 million or 60 million Chinese (depending on what Western author you read or talk show host you listen to) during a famine that hit several of China's provinces during what was called the Great Leap Forward (1959 - 1961).  All of these claims are based on the same sketchy, incomplete facts that were released by China's Communist Government in the 1980s. One so called reputable Western author used this excuse to double the figures another author claimed in her book.  He said that since we couldn't trust the Chinese Communists, he doubled all of the previous figures by this other author that inflated her claims from some other Western author.
                             
                            As the years go by, the claims of deaths from that famine grow by leaps and bounds. None of these Western authors or talk show hosts ever mentions that the US had a complete embargo on China and refused to supply China with wheat in 1960/61, when the CCP asked for help.  However, Canada and France broke ranks with the US embargo and helped out probably saving millions from starvation.
                             
                            Most of the time, if one knows where to look and dig for info, he or she will find out most of these claims are bogus and/or not as they appear.
                             
                            In addition, China is changing at such a rapid pace with rural villages being moved to make way for factories, roads, expressways, rail, etc., that there has been unrest by rural Chinese due to these changes but the work "insurrection" is by far very misleading.  Many of these types of disturbances and/or protests originate due to economic corruption at the local level where local government officials take advantage of all the money being used to modernize China and sikim some off the top.  When rumors of this type of corruption and graft spreads among the people, there are often protests both on Chinese Blogs and in physical protests to higher ranked government officials in Beijing.  Many of the people still trust the central government but believe that many in the lower ranks are crooks and the people hate that so they protest to gain attention of those at the top that do not know everything that is going on at the bottom. 
                             
                            The CCP has 80 million Party members spread out across China that has a total population of more than 1.3 billion in a country about the size of the United States.
                               
                            Lloyd Lofthouse
                             


                            --- On Wed, 7/4/12, Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...> wrote:

                            From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
                            Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                            To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Wednesday, July 4, 2012, 5:40 AM

                             
                            Lloyd,
                            The contract at Smashwords put me off, so I published with Createspace and had Blue Leaf do the conversion to all other ebook formats.

                            I was very happy with the professionality of the Createspace design staff. Before publishing, I showed their work to my friends at Viking/Penguin and Knopf. They had to admit that Createspace's work was at their own companies' standards of professionalism and the physical books were "state of the art"  - in fact Createspace uses the same company (Ingram) Viking/Penguin uses.

                            Lloyd, I have a question about China. I'm reading David Graeber's book "5000 years of Debt." He seems to be saying that peasant revolutions in China were commonplace, unlike in any other country. He claims (Kindle location 9689) "234,185 insurrections in China, averaging 43 events per day, or 1.8 outbreaks per hour (Deng 1999.220). 22. Following  Deng (1999).

                            This sounds to me like revisionist history to "normalize" the suffering inflicted during Mao's revolution for a generation that may now be asking why grandpa and grandma suffered so. What's going on? What's being counted as "insurrection"?

                            Bestens
                            Katherine




                            On 7/1/2012 10:59 AM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:
                             
                            Katherine,

                            Of course, I agree, Amazon outsells everyone else in the marketplace when it comes to e-books.  More than 90% of my sales are through Amazon Kindle.

                            What I meant by "giant" was that Amazon and Smashwords are the best sources of distribution to more e-book readers.

                            As far as I know, Kindle and Smashwords are the two most popular ways to sell books through other e-book readers such as Sony, iPad, Nook, etc.  I may be wrong, but the Barnes & Noble Nook, Sony, Kobi and iPad do not offer the applications that Amazon Kindle offers so people that own a Nook or iPad, laptop, ultrabook, desktop, tablet, smart phone, etc. may buy e-books through Amazon and read them on other devices other than a Kindle.

                            Amazon Kindle has these applications on every e-book page on their site and they are free to download.

                            Smashwords, on the other hand, has contracts with several other E-reader companies (but not Amazon Kindle) to convert e-books for e-readers such as the Sony, iPad and Nook.  Instead of dealing with each e-reader company one by one, publishing an e-book through Smashwords reaches most of the others offering a one stop shop for e-book publication.

                            By publishing e-books through Smashwords and Amazon Kindle at the same time, the author reaches a wider audience than publishing with one only.

                            The same business model works for tree books but with tree books, one ISBN is all that is necessary for the same title then the author may publish through Create Space and LSI at the same time to reach a wider potential audience for his or her work.

                            Create Space does offer an option ($ - it isn't free and and it will cause the tree book to cost more) to distribute tree books to a wider market outside Amazon. 

                            In June 2012, five tree books sold through LSI and 323 e-books through Amazon Kindle. I haven't checked my sales from Smashwords for June yet so there may have been a few more sales through that channel. Royalties from Smashwords are deposited to my PayPal account while Royalties through LSI and Amazon Kindle are paid into my bank-business account.


                            Lloyd Lofthouse
                             


                            --- On Sat, 6/30/12, Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...> wrote:

                            From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
                            Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                            To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 9:31 PM

                             
                            Lloyd,
                            I beg to differ. Kindle I believe outsells Nook, Sony and Ipad. Having thoseother  options as backupsthrough Smashwords, or a Blue Leaf conversion, isn't bad but giving Amazon the exclusive distribution opens the give-away factor, which isn't as good as it used to be but if you have a series it's nice to have 20,000 people grab copies of volume one. Whether the people who grab free books read them is another question, and now there are so many offered free that the thrill has worn off.

                            Amazon is not even adequate at reporting physical book sales but is excellent at reporting Kindle sales. A friend bought several copies of one of my books at one minute past midnight on the first of a month -- the sale showed up for me two minutes later on my Kindle reports. Oh yes, one can give ebooks for the Kindle reading ap for free -- I do often. They can be delivered almost instantly to New Zealand!

                            bestens
                            Katherine

                            On 6/30/2012 10:34 AM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:
                             
                            Publishing e-books

                            It's easy.  Smashwords and Amazon both offer free downloaded information that will guide you through the process. There are other e-book distributors but these are the two giants.  The reason I meantion Smashwords is because they distribute to the most popular e-book brands such as Nook, Sony, iPad, etc.



                            It costs nothing and both pay royalties after the first two months -- after that, both pay monthly but always two months later.  So if you published in January and sold e-books through both Amazon and Smashwords, they start paying your January royalties in March and so on.

                            There is an option to have them automatically deposit your royalties into a bank account. However, I don't know about a foreign bank--maybe they would pay into a PayPal account.

                            Sincerely,
                            Lloyd Lofthouse
                             


                            --- On Sat, 6/30/12, werda555 <werda555@...> wrote:

                            From: werda555 <werda555@...>
                            Subject: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                            To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 12:31 AM

                             
                            Hi all, I selfpublished a text book of 512 pages in 1989. It has become a collectors item and has sold as such for 15 times its original price.
                            I have working on the second edition amd like to publish it as an ebook, but I hear pro and cons all the time. I hear stories that google has been fixing prices and authors got very little money.
                            2. I have a ISBn for the hard copy, can I use the same ISBN or must I get a new one for an ebook.

                            3. Has anybody here published an ebook and how did he do it? Any pit falls getting paid via paypal. After all the work I put in, I do not want to make a strategig mistake.

                            Anybody here writing crime stories, spy stories or detective stories? If you have techical questions about ballistics or weapons for a book you are writing I gladly help you. Common mistakes "switching the safety off or on on a revolver". Revolvers do not have a safety!!

                            BTW I am not english speaking, please have some mercy when I make mistakes.

                            Regards and Thanks

                          • Lloyd Lofthouse
                            Katherine,   You are welcome. Lloyd Lofthouse iLook China My Splendid Concubine Our Hart, Elegy for a Concubine    ... From: Katherine Ashe
                            Message 13 of 20 , Jul 4, 2012
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Katherine,
                               
                              You are welcome.

                              Lloyd Lofthouse
                               


                              --- On Wed, 7/4/12, Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...> wrote:

                              From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
                              Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                              To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Wednesday, July 4, 2012, 6:05 PM

                               
                              Lloyd,
                              I'm so glad I know you -- you were the perfect person to ask!

                              I very much favor looking on every piece of information with the question -- what is the objective of the writer? Graeber's work is fascinating, but skewed. As indeed is everything -- but knowing which way the skewing goes is essential.

                              Thank you!
                              Kagtherine

                              On 7/4/2012 4:09 PM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:
                               

                              Katherine,
                               
                              "He claims (Kindle location 9689) "234,185 insurrections in China, averaging 43 events per day, or 1.8 outbreaks per hour (Deng 1999.220). 22. Following Deng (1999)."
                               
                              I read an article on this topic about where those facts come from and how they were misinterpreted to become anything anyone wanted them to mean.
                               
                              The Chinese (local) police are required to report every disturbance of two or more people to the central authorities on regular annual reports but there are no detailed explanations of what each disturbance was.  A disturbance (what so called experts in the West claim are insurrections) could simply be two drunken men having an argument or a husband beating up his wife's lover.  All disturbances of this type are reported with the same language that may be translated (often wrong) into English and as insurrection or riot.
                               
                              In 2008, there was a surge of disturbances throughout China at the same time that the US caused global financial crises swept the world causing millions to lose their jobs.  I have read that at least nine-million workers lost jobs in the US and in China, that number was more than 20-million suddenly out of work and angry to see their dreams trashed.
                               
                              It is understood that many people in China would be upset about losing their jobs as they see their employers go out of business.  In fact, thousands of private businesses that relied on exporting to the United States closed their doors. 
                               
                              To deal with this, China ordered state-run industries to hire people that were out of work but there was a time lag before this happened.  The CCP also sent millions of Chinese unemployed back to their rural villages with a meager unemployment check to help them avoid starvation. Since rural Chinese pay no rent, mortgage or property tax for most rural homes, it takes very little to live on in rural China. The cost of living in urban China is much higher.
                               
                              I asked Tom Carter, the author of China: Portrait of a People about this and he replied that he never saw or heard of any evidence of an "insurrection" during the two years he spent visiting every nook and cranny of every province in China mostly on foot while he was mixing with the people.  He even walked to Tibet where some Tibetan peasants took him in when a blizzard hit and almost froze him. He lived with those Tibetans for a week or so before he moved on.  He had only good things to say about how he was treated by most of the people he met in China.
                               
                              However, he was involved in an incident with a few Chinese drunks smoking cigarettes on the non-smoking floor of a hotel he stayed in during his two-year trek.  When he complained to the smokers, he was knocked down and ended up in the police station where he gave a report and was given advice by the police of his rights before they released him.  He wrote about that in a guest post for my Blog.  I'm sure that incident was added to all the other so-called "insurrections" that some claim took place in China.
                               
                              Tom wrote a post about Crime in China. Tom went to China several years ago to teach ESL.  A few years later, he hit the road for two years. He has lived in both rural and urban China, then a few months ago he married his Chinese girlfriend, and they are now expecting a child. Tom is teaching ESL again in Shanghai to support his new growing family.
                               
                               
                              I have discovered that China's Western critics often take anything they can from China and twist it to make the CCP look bad.  However, China's state owned media publically report the facts used in these negative reports of China. What Western critics of China do with this information is often a crime.
                               
                               
                              What is really amazing are the Western claims that Mao and the Party deliberately caused the deaths of 3.75-million or 16-million or 20-million or 30-million or 45 million or 60 million Chinese (depending on what Western author you read or talk show host you listen to) during a famine that hit several of China's provinces during what was called the Great Leap Forward (1959 - 1961).  All of these claims are based on the same sketchy, incomplete facts that were released by China's Communist Government in the 1980s. One so called reputable Western author used this excuse to double the figures another author claimed in her book.  He said that since we couldn't trust the Chinese Communists, he doubled all of the previous figures by this other author that inflated her claims from some other Western author.
                               
                              As the years go by, the claims of deaths from that famine grow by leaps and bounds. None of these Western authors or talk show hosts ever mentions that the US had a complete embargo on China and refused to supply China with wheat in 1960/61, when the CCP asked for help.  However, Canada and France broke ranks with the US embargo and helped out probably saving millions from starvation.
                               
                              Most of the time, if one knows where to look and dig for info, he or she will find out most of these claims are bogus and/or not as they appear.
                               
                              In addition, China is changing at such a rapid pace with rural villages being moved to make way for factories, roads, expressways, rail, etc., that there has been unrest by rural Chinese due to these changes but the work "insurrection" is by far very misleading.  Many of these types of disturbances and/or protests originate due to economic corruption at the local level where local government officials take advantage of all the money being used to modernize China and sikim some off the top.  When rumors of this type of corruption and graft spreads among the people, there are often protests both on Chinese Blogs and in physical protests to higher ranked government officials in Beijing.  Many of the people still trust the central government but believe that many in the lower ranks are crooks and the people hate that so they protest to gain attention of those at the top that do not know everything that is going on at the bottom. 
                               
                              The CCP has 80 million Party members spread out across China that has a total population of more than 1.3 billion in a country about the size of the United States.
                                 
                              Lloyd Lofthouse
                               


                              --- On Wed, 7/4/12, Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...> wrote:

                              From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
                              Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                              To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Wednesday, July 4, 2012, 5:40 AM

                               
                              Lloyd,
                              The contract at Smashwords put me off, so I published with Createspace and had Blue Leaf do the conversion to all other ebook formats.

                              I was very happy with the professionality of the Createspace design staff. Before publishing, I showed their work to my friends at Viking/Penguin and Knopf. They had to admit that Createspace's work was at their own companies' standards of professionalism and the physical books were "state of the art"  - in fact Createspace uses the same company (Ingram) Viking/Penguin uses.

                              Lloyd, I have a question about China. I'm reading David Graeber's book "5000 years of Debt." He seems to be saying that peasant revolutions in China were commonplace, unlike in any other country. He claims (Kindle location 9689) "234,185 insurrections in China, averaging 43 events per day, or 1.8 outbreaks per hour (Deng 1999.220). 22. Following  Deng (1999).

                              This sounds to me like revisionist history to "normalize" the suffering inflicted during Mao's revolution for a generation that may now be asking why grandpa and grandma suffered so. What's going on? What's being counted as "insurrection"?

                              Bestens
                              Katherine




                              On 7/1/2012 10:59 AM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:
                               
                              Katherine,

                              Of course, I agree, Amazon outsells everyone else in the marketplace when it comes to e-books.  More than 90% of my sales are through Amazon Kindle.

                              What I meant by "giant" was that Amazon and Smashwords are the best sources of distribution to more e-book readers.

                              As far as I know, Kindle and Smashwords are the two most popular ways to sell books through other e-book readers such as Sony, iPad, Nook, etc.  I may be wrong, but the Barnes & Noble Nook, Sony, Kobi and iPad do not offer the applications that Amazon Kindle offers so people that own a Nook or iPad, laptop, ultrabook, desktop, tablet, smart phone, etc. may buy e-books through Amazon and read them on other devices other than a Kindle.

                              Amazon Kindle has these applications on every e-book page on their site and they are free to download.

                              Smashwords, on the other hand, has contracts with several other E-reader companies (but not Amazon Kindle) to convert e-books for e-readers such as the Sony, iPad and Nook.  Instead of dealing with each e-reader company one by one, publishing an e-book through Smashwords reaches most of the others offering a one stop shop for e-book publication.

                              By publishing e-books through Smashwords and Amazon Kindle at the same time, the author reaches a wider audience than publishing with one only.

                              The same business model works for tree books but with tree books, one ISBN is all that is necessary for the same title then the author may publish through Create Space and LSI at the same time to reach a wider potential audience for his or her work.

                              Create Space does offer an option ($ - it isn't free and and it will cause the tree book to cost more) to distribute tree books to a wider market outside Amazon. 

                              In June 2012, five tree books sold through LSI and 323 e-books through Amazon Kindle. I haven't checked my sales from Smashwords for June yet so there may have been a few more sales through that channel. Royalties from Smashwords are deposited to my PayPal account while Royalties through LSI and Amazon Kindle are paid into my bank-business account.


                              Lloyd Lofthouse
                               


                              --- On Sat, 6/30/12, Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...> wrote:

                              From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
                              Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                              To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 9:31 PM

                               
                              Lloyd,
                              I beg to differ. Kindle I believe outsells Nook, Sony and Ipad. Having thoseother  options as backupsthrough Smashwords, or a Blue Leaf conversion, isn't bad but giving Amazon the exclusive distribution opens the give-away factor, which isn't as good as it used to be but if you have a series it's nice to have 20,000 people grab copies of volume one. Whether the people who grab free books read them is another question, and now there are so many offered free that the thrill has worn off.

                              Amazon is not even adequate at reporting physical book sales but is excellent at reporting Kindle sales. A friend bought several copies of one of my books at one minute past midnight on the first of a month -- the sale showed up for me two minutes later on my Kindle reports. Oh yes, one can give ebooks for the Kindle reading ap for free -- I do often. They can be delivered almost instantly to New Zealand!

                              bestens
                              Katherine

                              On 6/30/2012 10:34 AM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:
                               
                              Publishing e-books

                              It's easy.  Smashwords and Amazon both offer free downloaded information that will guide you through the process. There are other e-book distributors but these are the two giants.  The reason I meantion Smashwords is because they distribute to the most popular e-book brands such as Nook, Sony, iPad, etc.



                              It costs nothing and both pay royalties after the first two months -- after that, both pay monthly but always two months later.  So if you published in January and sold e-books through both Amazon and Smashwords, they start paying your January royalties in March and so on.

                              There is an option to have them automatically deposit your royalties into a bank account. However, I don't know about a foreign bank--maybe they would pay into a PayPal account.

                              Sincerely,
                              Lloyd Lofthouse
                               


                              --- On Sat, 6/30/12, werda555 <werda555@...> wrote:

                              From: werda555 <werda555@...>
                              Subject: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                              To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 12:31 AM

                               
                              Hi all, I selfpublished a text book of 512 pages in 1989. It has become a collectors item and has sold as such for 15 times its original price.
                              I have working on the second edition amd like to publish it as an ebook, but I hear pro and cons all the time. I hear stories that google has been fixing prices and authors got very little money.
                              2. I have a ISBn for the hard copy, can I use the same ISBN or must I get a new one for an ebook.

                              3. Has anybody here published an ebook and how did he do it? Any pit falls getting paid via paypal. After all the work I put in, I do not want to make a strategig mistake.

                              Anybody here writing crime stories, spy stories or detective stories? If you have techical questions about ballistics or weapons for a book you are writing I gladly help you. Common mistakes "switching the safety off or on on a revolver". Revolvers do not have a safety!!

                              BTW I am not english speaking, please have some mercy when I make mistakes.

                              Regards and Thanks

                            • Kris Jackson
                              My perspective is much more limited, but doing geek work for fifteen years met me a lot of Chinese. Their attitude toward their government tended to be, sure,
                              Message 14 of 20 , Jul 5, 2012
                              • 0 Attachment
                                My perspective is much more limited, but doing geek work for fifteen years met me a lot of Chinese. Their attitude toward their government tended to be, sure, the government is autocratic, but so what? We all have HDTVs and vacation in Disneyland. We wanted to eat, they let us eat. We wanted to earn, they let us. When we want democracy we'll get that, too. Shrug.

                                Turn on the state media in China, everything's rosy. Check Twitter and it changes.

                                There was an interesting news story a few years ago. The state media reported that a nut had gone into an elementary school with explosives and blew it up. It was quite believable, there's a lot of loose explosives there. But at a national party congress, President Hu told the real story: the children were making fireworks all day instead of studying, and there was an accident. The reason he copped to it was that the real story was widely circulated via email, fax and Twitter and there was no longer a way to contain it. Technology again, folks.

                                And make no mistake: we writers change the world more than just about anybody else.

                                --Kris Jackson

                                Author of Above theFray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps

                                774-276-0116

                                On 7/4/2012 9:05 PM, Katherine Ashe wrote:
                                 

                                Lloyd,
                                I'm so glad I know you -- you were the perfect person to ask!

                                I very much favor looking on every piece of information with the question -- what is the objective of the writer? Graeber's work is fascinating, but skewed. As indeed is everything -- but knowing which way the skewing goes is essential.

                                Thank you!
                                Kagtherine

                                On 7/4/2012 4:09 PM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:

                                 

                                Katherine,
                                 
                                "He claims (Kindle location 9689) "234,185 insurrections in China, averaging 43 events per day, or 1.8 outbreaks per hour (Deng 1999.220). 22. Following Deng (1999)."
                                 
                                I read an article on this topic about where those facts come from and how they were misinterpreted to become anything anyone wanted them to mean.
                                 
                                The Chinese (local) police are required to report every disturbance of two or more people to the central authorities on regular annual reports but there are no detailed explanations of what each disturbance was.  A disturbance (what so called experts in the West claim are insurrections) could simply be two drunken men having an argument or a husband beating up his wife's lover.  All disturbances of this type are reported with the same language that may be translated (often wrong) into English and as insurrection or riot.
                                 
                                In 2008, there was a surge of disturbances throughout China at the same time that the US caused global financial crises swept the world causing millions to lose their jobs.  I have read that at least nine-million workers lost jobs in the US and in China, that number was more than 20-million suddenly out of work and angry to see their dreams trashed.
                                 
                                It is understood that many people in China would be upset about losing their jobs as they see their employers go out of business.  In fact, thousands of private businesses that relied on exporting to the United States closed their doors. 
                                 
                                To deal with this, China ordered state-run industries to hire people that were out of work but there was a time lag before this happened.  The CCP also sent millions of Chinese unemployed back to their rural villages with a meager unemployment check to help them avoid starvation. Since rural Chinese pay no rent, mortgage or property tax for most rural homes, it takes very little to live on in rural China. The cost of living in urban China is much higher.
                                 
                                I asked Tom Carter, the author of China: Portrait of a People about this and he replied that he never saw or heard of any evidence of an "insurrection" during the two years he spent visiting every nook and cranny of every province in China mostly on foot while he was mixing with the people.  He even walked to Tibet where some Tibetan peasants took him in when a blizzard hit and almost froze him. He lived with those Tibetans for a week or so before he moved on.  He had only good things to say about how he was treated by most of the people he met in China.
                                 
                                However, he was involved in an incident with a few Chinese drunks smoking cigarettes on the non-smoking floor of a hotel he stayed in during his two-year trek.  When he complained to the smokers, he was knocked down and ended up in the police station where he gave a report and was given advice by the police of his rights before they released him.  Hewrote about that in a guest post for my Blog.  I'm sure that incident was added to all the other so-called "insurrections" that some claim took place in China.
                                 
                                Tom wrote a post about Crime in China. Tom went to China several years ago to teach ESL.  A few years later, he hit the road for two years. He has lived in both rural and urban China, then a few months ago he married his Chinese girlfriend, and they are now expecting a child. Tom is teaching ESL again in Shanghai to support his new growing family.
                                 
                                 
                                I have discovered that China's Western critics often take anything they can from China and twist it to make the CCP look bad.  However, China's state owned media publically report the facts used in these negative reports of China. What Western critics of China do with this information is often a crime.
                                 
                                 
                                What is really amazing are the Western claims that Mao and the Party deliberately caused the deaths of 3.75-million or 16-million or 20-million or 30-million or 45 million or 60 million Chinese (depending on what Western author you read or talk show host you listen to) during a famine that hit several of China's provinces during what was called the Great Leap Forward (1959 - 1961).  All of these claims are based on the same sketchy, incomplete facts that were released by China's Communist Government in the 1980s. One so called reputable Western author used this excuse to double the figures another author claimed in her book.  He said that since we couldn't trust the Chinese Communists, he doubled all of the previous figures by this other author that inflated her claims from some other Western author.
                                 
                                As the years go by, the claims of deaths from that famine grow by leaps and bounds. None of these Western authors or talk show hosts ever mentions that the US had a complete embargo on China and refused to supply China with wheat in 1960/61, when the CCP asked for help.  However, Canada and France broke ranks with the US embargo and helped out probably saving millions from starvation.
                                 
                                Most of the time, if one knows where to look and dig for info, he or she will find out most of these claims are bogus and/or not as they appear.
                                 
                                In addition, China is changing at such a rapid pace with rural villages being moved to make way for factories, roads, expressways, rail, etc., that there has been unrest by rural Chinese due to these changes but the work "insurrection" is by far very misleading.  Many of these types of disturbances and/or protests originate due to economic corruption at the local level where local government officials take advantage of all the money being used to modernize China and sikim some off the top.  When rumors of this type of corruption and graft spreads among the people, there are often protests both on Chinese Blogs and in physical protests to higher ranked government officials in Beijing.  Manyof the people still trust the central government but believe that many in the lower ranks are crooks and the people hate that so they protest to gain attention of those at the top that do not know everything that is going on at the bottom. 
                                 
                                The CCP has 80 million Party members spread out across China that has a total population of more than 1.3 billion in a country about the size of the United States.
                                   
                                Lloyd Lofthouse
                                 


                                --- On Wed, 7/4/12, Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...> wrote:

                                From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
                                Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                                To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Wednesday, July 4, 2012, 5:40 AM

                                 
                                Lloyd,
                                The contract at Smashwords put me off, so I published with Createspace and had Blue Leaf do the conversion to all other ebook formats.

                                I was very happy with the professionality of the Createspace design staff. Before publishing, I showed their work to my friends at Viking/Penguin and Knopf. They had to admit that Createspace's work was at their own companies' standards of professionalism and the physical books were "state of the art"  - in fact Createspace uses the same company (Ingram) Viking/Penguin uses.

                                Lloyd, I have a question about China. I'm reading David Graeber's book "5000 years of Debt." He seems to be saying that peasant revolutions in China were commonplace, unlike in any other country. He claims (Kindle location 9689) "234,185 insurrections in China, averaging 43 events per day, or 1.8 outbreaks per hour (Deng 1999.220). 22. Following  Deng (1999).

                                This sounds to me like revisionist history to "normalize" the suffering inflicted during Mao's revolution for a generation that may now be asking why grandpa and grandma suffered so. What's going on? What's being counted as "insurrection"?

                                Bestens
                                Katherine




                                On 7/1/2012 10:59 AM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:
                                 
                                Katherine,

                                Of course, I agree, Amazon outsells everyone else in the marketplace when it comes to e-books.  More than 90% of my sales are through Amazon Kindle.

                                What I meant by "giant" was that Amazon and Smashwords are the best sources of distribution to more e-book readers.

                                As far as I know, Kindle and Smashwords are the two most popular ways to sell books through other e-book readers such as Sony, iPad, Nook, etc.  I may be wrong, but the Barnes & Noble Nook, Sony, Kobi and iPad do not offer the applications that Amazon Kindle offers so people that own a Nook or iPad, laptop, ultrabook, desktop, tablet, smart phone, etc. may buy e-books through Amazon and read them on other devices other than a Kindle.

                                Amazon Kindle has these applications on every e-book page on their site and they are free to download.

                                Smashwords, on the other hand, has contracts with several other E-reader companies (but not Amazon Kindle) to convert e-books for e-readers such as the Sony, iPad and Nook.  Instead of dealing with each e-reader company one by one, publishing an e-book through Smashwords reaches most of the others offering a one stop shop for e-book publication.

                                By publishing e-books through Smashwords and Amazon Kindle at the same time, the author reaches a wider audience than publishing with one only.

                                The same business model works for tree books but with tree books, one ISBN is all that is necessary for the same title then the author may publish through Create Space and LSI at the same time to reach a wider potential audience for his or her work.

                                Create Space does offer an option ($ - it isn't free and and it will cause the tree book to cost more) to distribute tree books to a wider market outside Amazon. 

                                In June 2012, five tree books sold through LSI and 323 e-books through Amazon Kindle. I haven't checked my sales from Smashwords for June yet so there may have been a few more sales through that channel. Royalties from Smashwords are deposited to my PayPal account while Royalties through LSI and Amazon Kindle are paid into my bank-business account.


                                Lloyd Lofthouse
                                 


                                --- On Sat, 6/30/12, Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...> wrote:

                                From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
                                Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                                To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 9:31 PM

                                 
                                Lloyd,
                                I beg to differ. Kindle I believe outsells Nook, Sony and Ipad. Having thoseother  options as backupsthrough Smashwords, or a Blue Leaf conversion, isn't bad but giving Amazon the exclusive distribution opens the give-away factor, which isn't as good as it used to be but if you have a series it's nice to have 20,000 people grab copies of volume one. Whether the people who grab free books read them is another question, and now there are so many offered free that the thrill has worn off.

                                Amazon is not even adequate at reporting physical book sales but is excellent at reporting Kindle sales. A friend bought several copies of one of my books at one minute past midnight on the first of a month -- the sale showed up for me two minutes later on my Kindle reports. Oh yes, one can give ebooks for the Kindle reading ap for free -- I do often. They can be delivered almost instantly to New Zealand!

                                bestens
                                Katherine

                                On 6/30/2012 10:34 AM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:
                                 
                                Publishinge-books

                                It's easy.  Smashwords and Amazon both offer free downloaded information that will guide you through the process. There are other e-book distributors but these are the two giants.  The reason I meantion Smashwords is because they distribute to the most popular e-book brands such as Nook, Sony, iPad, etc.



                                It costs nothing and both pay royalties after the first two months -- after that, both pay monthly but always two months later.  So if you published in January and sold e-books through both Amazon and Smashwords, they start paying your January royalties in March and so on.

                                There is an option to have them automatically deposit your royalties into a bank account. However, I don't know about a foreign bank--maybe they would pay into a PayPal account.

                                Sincerely,
                                Lloyd Lofthouse
                                 


                                --- On Sat,6/30/12, werda555 <werda555@...> wrote:

                                From: werda555 <werda555@...>
                                Subject: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                                To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 12:31 AM

                                 
                                Hi all, I selfpublished a text book of 512 pages in 1989. It has become a collectors item and has sold as such for 15 times its original price.
                                I have working on the second edition amd like to publish it as an ebook, but I hear pro and cons all the time. I hear stories that google has been fixing prices and authors got very little money.
                                2. I have a ISBn for the hard copy, can I use the same ISBN or must I get a new one for an ebook.

                                3. Has anybody here published an ebook and how did he do it? Any pit falls getting paid via paypal. After all the work I put in, I do not want to make a strategig mistake.

                                Anybody here writing crime stories, spy stories or detective stories? If you have techical questions about ballistics or weapons for a book you are writing I gladly help you. Common mistakes "switching the safety off or on on a revolver". Revolvers do not have a safety!!

                                BTW I am not english speaking, please have some mercy when I make mistakes.

                                Regards and Thanks



                            • Katherine Ashe
                              Thank you, Chris. Yes, the Chinese have been notorious for their history being social engineering rather than accounts of the past as are found in sources that
                              Message 15 of 20 , Jul 5, 2012
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Thank you, Chris. Yes, the Chinese have been notorious for their history being social engineering rather than accounts of the past as are found in sources that are not edited by the government. And the internet is a great boon for historians -- or will be when the present is "history."
                                Katherine Ashe
                                author of Montfort, a four volume novel on the life of the founder of England's Parliament.
                                http://www.amazon.com/Katherine-Ashe/e/B004OTWHNQ/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1341511672&sr=1-2-ent

                                On 7/5/2012 1:05 PM, Kris Jackson wrote:
                                 

                                My perspective is much more limited, but doing geek work for fifteen years met me a lot of Chinese. Their attitude toward their government tended to be, sure, the government is autocratic, but so what? We all have HDTVs and vacation in Disneyland. We wanted to eat, they let us eat. We wanted to earn, they let us. When we want democracy we'll get that, too. Shrug.

                                Turn on the state media in China, everything's rosy. Check Twitter and it changes.

                                There was an interesting news story a few years ago. The state media reported that a nut had gone into an elementary school with explosives and blew it up. It was quite believable, there's a lot of loose explosives there. But at a national party congress, President Hu told the real story: the children were making fireworks all day instead of studying, and there was an accident. The reason he copped to it was that the real story was widely circulated via email, fax and Twitter and there was no longer a way to contain it. Technology again, folks.

                                And make no mistake: we writers change the world more than just about anybody else.

                                --Kris Jackson

                                Author of Above theFray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps

                                774-276-0116

                                On 7/4/2012 9:05 PM, Katherine Ashe wrote:
                                 

                                Lloyd,
                                I'm so glad I know you -- you were the perfect person to ask!

                                I very much favor looking on every piece of information with the question -- what is the objective of the writer? Graeber's work is fascinating, but skewed. As indeed is everything -- but knowing which way the skewing goes is essential.

                                Thank you!
                                Kagtherine

                                On 7/4/2012 4:09 PM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:

                                 

                                Katherine,
                                 
                                "He claims (Kindle location 9689) "234,185 insurrections in China, averaging 43 events per day, or 1.8 outbreaks per hour (Deng 1999.220). 22. Following Deng (1999)."
                                 
                                I read an article on this topic about where those facts come from and how they were misinterpreted to become anything anyone wanted them to mean.
                                 
                                The Chinese (local) police are required to report every disturbance of two or more people to the central authorities on regular annual reports but there are no detailed explanations of what each disturbance was.  A disturbance (what so called experts in the West claim are insurrections) could simply be two drunken men having an argument or a husband beating up his wife's lover.  All disturbances of this type are reported with the same language that may be translated (often wrong) into English and as insurrection or riot.
                                 
                                In 2008, there was a surge of disturbances throughout China at the same time that the US caused global financial crises swept the world causing millions to lose their jobs.  I have read that at least nine-million workers lost jobs in the US and in China, that number was more than 20-million suddenly out of work and angry to see their dreams trashed.
                                 
                                It is understood that many people in China would be upset about losing their jobs as they see their employers go out of business.  In fact, thousands of private businesses that relied on exporting to the United States closed their doors. 
                                 
                                To deal with this, China ordered state-run industries to hire people that were out of work but there was a time lag before this happened.  The CCP also sent millions of Chinese unemployed back to their rural villages with a meager unemployment check to help them avoid starvation. Since rural Chinese pay no rent, mortgage or property tax for most rural homes, it takes very little to live on in rural China. The cost of living in urban China is much higher.
                                 
                                I asked Tom Carter, the author of China: Portrait of a People about this and he replied that he never saw or heard of any evidence of an "insurrection" during the two years he spent visiting every nook and cranny of every province in China mostly on foot while he was mixing with the people.  He even walked to Tibet where some Tibetan peasants took him in when a blizzard hit and almost froze him. He lived with those Tibetans for a week or so before he moved on.  He had only good things to say about how he was treated by most of the people he met in China.
                                 
                                However, he was involved in an incident with a few Chinese drunks smoking cigarettes on the non-smoking floor of a hotel he stayed in during his two-year trek.  When he complained to the smokers, he was knocked down and ended up in the police station where he gave a report and was given advice by the police of his rights before they released him.  Hewrote about that in a guest post for my Blog.  I'm sure that incident was added to all the other so-called "insurrections" that some claim took place in China.
                                 
                                Tom wrote a post about Crime in China. Tom went to China several years ago to teach ESL.  A few years later, he hit the road for two years. He has lived in both rural and urban China, then a few months ago he married his Chinese girlfriend, and they are now expecting a child. Tom is teaching ESL again in Shanghai to support his new growing family.
                                 
                                 
                                I have discovered that China's Western critics often take anything they can from China and twist it to make the CCP look bad.  However, China's state owned media publically report the facts used in these negative reports of China. What Western critics of China do with this information is often a crime.
                                 
                                 
                                What is really amazing are the Western claims that Mao and the Party deliberately caused the deaths of 3.75-million or 16-million or 20-million or 30-million or 45 million or 60 million Chinese (depending on what Western author you read or talk show host you listen to) during a famine that hit several of China's provinces during what was called the Great Leap Forward (1959 - 1961).  All of these claims are based on the same sketchy, incomplete facts that were released by China's Communist Government in the 1980s. One so called reputable Western author used this excuse to double the figures another author claimed in her book.  He said that since we couldn't trust the Chinese Communists, he doubled all of the previous figures by this other author that inflated her claims from some other Western author.
                                 
                                As the years go by, the claims of deaths from that famine grow by leaps and bounds. None of these Western authors or talk show hosts ever mentions that the US had a complete embargo on China and refused to supply China with wheat in 1960/61, when the CCP asked for help.  However, Canada and France broke ranks with the US embargo and helped out probably saving millions from starvation.
                                 
                                Most of the time, if one knows where to look and dig for info, he or she will find out most of these claims are bogus and/or not as they appear.
                                 
                                In addition, China is changing at such a rapid pace with rural villages being moved to make way for factories, roads, expressways, rail, etc., that there has been unrest by rural Chinese due to these changes but the work "insurrection" is by far very misleading.  Many of these types of disturbances and/or protests originate due to economic corruption at the local level where local government officials take advantage of all the money being used to modernize China and sikim some off the top.  When rumors of this type of corruption and graft spreads among the people, there are often protests both on Chinese Blogs and in physical protests to higher ranked government officials in Beijing.  Many of the people still trust the central government but believe that many in the lower ranks are crooks and the people hate that so they protest to gain attention of those at the top that do not know everything that is going on at the bottom. 
                                 
                                The CCP has 80 million Party members spread out across China that has a total population of more than 1.3 billion in a country about the size of the United States.
                                   
                                Lloyd Lofthouse
                                 


                                --- On Wed, 7/4/12, Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...> wrote:

                                From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
                                Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                                To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Wednesday, July 4, 2012, 5:40 AM

                                 
                                Lloyd,
                                The contract at Smashwords put me off, so I published with Createspace and had Blue Leaf do the conversion to all other ebook formats.

                                I was very happy with the professionality of the Createspace design staff. Before publishing, I showed their work to my friends at Viking/Penguin and Knopf. They had to admit that Createspace's work was at their own companies' standards of professionalism and the physical books were "state of the art"  - in fact Createspace uses the same company (Ingram) Viking/Penguin uses.

                                Lloyd, I have a question about China. I'm reading David Graeber's book "5000 years of Debt." He seems to be saying that peasant revolutions in China were commonplace, unlike in any other country. He claims (Kindle location 9689) "234,185 insurrections in China, averaging 43 events per day, or 1.8 outbreaks per hour (Deng 1999.220). 22. Following  Deng (1999).

                                This sounds to me like revisionist history to "normalize" the suffering inflicted during Mao's revolution for a generation that may now be asking why grandpa and grandma suffered so. What's going on? What's being counted as "insurrection"?

                                Bestens
                                Katherine




                                On 7/1/2012 10:59 AM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:
                                 
                                Katherine,

                                Of course, I agree, Amazon outsells everyone else in the marketplace when it comes to e-books.  More than 90% of my sales are through Amazon Kindle.

                                What I meant by "giant" was that Amazon and Smashwords are the best sources of distribution to more e-book readers.

                                As far as I know, Kindle and Smashwords are the two most popular ways to sell books through other e-book readers such as Sony, iPad, Nook, etc.  I may be wrong, but the Barnes & Noble Nook, Sony, Kobi and iPad do not offer the applications that Amazon Kindle offers so people that own a Nook or iPad, laptop, ultrabook, desktop, tablet, smart phone, etc. may buy e-books through Amazon and read them on other devices other than a Kindle.

                                Amazon Kindle has these applications on every e-book page on their site and they are free to download.

                                Smashwords,on the other hand, has contracts with several other E-reader companies (but not Amazon Kindle) to convert e-books for e-readers such as the Sony, iPad and Nook.  Instead of dealing with each e-reader company one by one, publishing an e-book through Smashwords reaches most of the others offering a one stop shop for e-book publication.

                                By publishing e-books through Smashwords and Amazon Kindle at the same time, the author reaches a wider audience than publishing with one only.

                                The same business model works for tree books but with tree books, one ISBN is all that is necessary for the same title then the author may publish through Create Space and LSI at the same time to reach a wider potential audience for his or her work.

                                Create Space does offer an option ($ - it isn't free and and it will cause the tree book to cost more) to distribute tree books to a wider market outside Amazon. 

                                In June 2012, five tree books sold through LSI and 323 e-books through Amazon Kindle. I haven't checked my sales from Smashwords for June yet so there may have been a few more sales through that channel. Royalties from Smashwords are deposited to my PayPal account while Royalties through LSI and Amazon Kindle are paid into my bank-business account.


                                Lloyd Lofthouse
                                 


                                --- On Sat,6/30/12, Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...> wrote:

                                From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
                                Subject: Re: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                                To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 9:31 PM

                                 
                                Lloyd,
                                I beg to differ. Kindle I believe outsells Nook, Sony and Ipad. Having thoseother  options as backupsthrough Smashwords, or a Blue Leaf conversion, isn't bad but giving Amazon the exclusive distribution opens the give-away factor, which isn't as good as it used to be but if you have a series it's nice to have 20,000 people grab copies of volume one. Whether the people who grab free books read them is another question, and now there are so many offered free that the thrill has worn off.

                                Amazon is not even adequate at reporting physical book sales but is excellent at reporting Kindle sales. A friend bought several copies of one of my books at one minute past midnight on the first of a month -- the sale showed up for me two minutes later on my Kindle reports. Oh yes, one can give ebooks for the Kindle reading ap for free -- I do often. They can be delivered almost instantly to New Zealand!

                                bestens
                                Katherine

                                On 6/30/2012 10:34 AM, Lloyd Lofthouse wrote:
                                 
                                Publishinge-books

                                It's easy.  Smashwords and Amazon both offer free downloaded information that will guide you through the process. There are other e-book distributors but these are the two giants.  The reason I meantion Smashwords is because they distribute to the most popular e-book brands such as Nook, Sony, iPad, etc.



                                It costs nothing and both pay royalties after the first two months -- after that, both pay monthly but always two months later.  So if you published in January and sold e-books through both Amazon and Smashwords, they start paying your January royalties in March and so on.

                                There is an option to have them automatically deposit your royalties into a bank account. However, I don't know about a foreign bank--maybe they would pay into a PayPal account.

                                Sincerely,
                                Lloyd Lofthouse
                                 


                                --- On Sat,6/30/12, werda555 <werda555@...> wrote:

                                From: werda555 <werda555@...>
                                Subject: [IAG-members] ebboks or not
                                To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012, 12:31 AM

                                 
                                Hi all, I selfpublished a text book of 512 pages in 1989. It has become a collectors item and has sold as such for 15 times its original price.
                                I have working on the second edition amd like to publish it as an ebook, but I hear pro and cons all the time. I hear stories that google has been fixing prices and authors got very little money.
                                2. I have a ISBn for the hard copy, can I use the same ISBN or must I get a new one for an ebook.

                                3. Has anybody here published an ebook and how did he do it? Any pit falls getting paid via paypal. After all the work I put in, I do not want to make a strategig mistake.

                                Anybody here writing crime stories, spy stories or detective stories? If you have techical questions about ballistics or weapons for a book you are writing I gladly help you. Common mistakes "switching the safety off or on on a revolver". Revolvers

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