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Re: [IAG-members] Re: Promotion

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  • tutor2000
    I love this idea. Even walking around with your book ypud get attention. I heard just sitting at the table disnt get as many sales Sent from my MOTOROLA
    Message 1 of 37 , Apr 1 7:43 PM
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      I love this idea. Even walking around with your book ypud get attention. I heard just sitting at the table disnt get as many sales

      Sent from my MOTOROLA ATRIX™ 2 on AT&T
      Http://ComputerHelp808.com
      Http://KirkhamsEbooks.com
      Http://SimpleBusinessVentures.com


      -----Original message-----
      From: sandyfoster morrison <sandyfostermorrison@...>
      To:
      "IAG-members@yahoogroups.com" <IAG-members@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent:
      Sat, Mar 31, 2012 02:33:16 GMT+00:00
      Subject:
      Re: [IAG-members] Re: Promotion

      How cool, Janet. Dressing in character is brilliant. And a man in kilts will always attract a crowd, or at least me! Not sure I can adapt the bagpipe trick for my venues, but it is reason, in the next novel, to send a philandering character to Scotland. So you agree, book-signings can be theater! I like it.
       
      Sandy Foster Morrison
      5150 Broadway, PMB 199
      San Antonio, TX 78209
      210-323-8201 (c)
       
       
            
      Your playing small does not serve the world.... We are all meant to shine, as children do. Marianne Williamson, A Return to Love 

      From: janetelaine smith <janetelainesmith@...>
      To: "IAG-members@yahoogroups.com" <IAG-members@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, March 30, 2012 8:55 PM
      Subject: Re: [IAG-members] Re: Promotion

       
      I love signings and events at restaurants, coffee shops, etc. It is a whole different clientele that you get there than the people at a bookstore. Much friendlier, open, etc. I often dress as one of my characters when I do that. When people ask me about it, I usually say, "Oh, I'm just being one of my characters." One night at a coffee house, a woman I knew (only slightly) said, "She doesn't need any help. She IS a character." Hey, whatever works. The booksigning that I did when my first book came out at a BDalton bookstore in Grand Forks was a lot of fun. The book is a Scottish historical. I rented a bagpiper to go with me, dressed in his full kilt and all. It definitely attracted a crowd.
      Janet
       
      Keith Trilogy now at Omnilit.com
      Keith Trilogy in Kindle now 
      Travel with JES to Venezuela and back here ;
      Just click on the cover of Rebel With a Cause
      Check out videos here
       
       
       

      From: sandyfoster morrison <sandyfostermorrison@...>
      To: "IAG-members@yahoogroups.com" <IAG-members@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, March 30, 2012 8:47 PM
      Subject: Re: [IAG-members] Re: Promotion



      Thanks, Janet, for your input with reference to book store signings. I experienced low sales this Thursday night for a reading at B&N. But, some of the guests did ask for one of my book cards so they could order the Kindle version. And yes, I always sign and personalize which sometimes elicts the same declaration: "This will be worth something when you're a bestseller! " One can hope.
       
      I've been wondering if it was a good move at the end of April to go for a Wine Bar event on Main Street in Fredericksburg (Texas Hill Country escape with wineries dotting the landscape). Sounds like you would say "yes." Actually do get that the setting might be a draw. The owner is all over it - his idea actually - and promised promotion and a "gathering all the locals." I get it. I'm the entertainment. I'll be sure to look fetching and lead with humor. Theater, right? Maybe I should sparkle, too. A good show is good for his business and most likely, mine. At any rate, this reading will test previous traditions for indy book sales. I'll let you know how it turns out.
       
      Sandy
       
      Sandy Foster Morrison
      5150 Broadway, PMB 199
      San Antonio, TX 78209
      210-323-8201 (c)
       
      http://www.sandyfostermorrison.com
       
            
      Your playing small does not serve the world.... We are all meant to shine, as children do. Marianne Williamson, A Return to Love 

      From: janetelaine smith <janetelainesmith@...>
      To: "IAG-members@yahoogroups.com" <IAG-members@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, March 30, 2012 1:48 PM
      Subject: Re: [IAG-members] Re: Promotion

       
      I've said it before, but it bears repeating because some of you are fairly new. I have had way better success (sales-wise) at arts & craft shows or speaking engagements than at any bookstore signings. Some of them are "okay," but it is not unusual to not sell a single book at a bookstore. So why do I keep doing them? For one thing, it is a sure fire way to get your books into the bookstore. Also, it's a great way to get your name known. Besides, some of the people you meet might actually buy a book sometime later. Also, I always have an ample supply of promotional materials and I always sign them with a personal message to each person who picks one up. Why? They are much less apt to throw it away if it is autographed. Like one fellow said after I gave him a signed postcard: "Just imagine what this baby will be worth on eBay when she's REALLY famous!"
      Janet
       
      Keith Trilogy now at Omnilit.com
      Keith Trilogy in Kindle now 
      Travel with JES to Venezuela and back here ;
      Just click on the cover of Rebel With a Cause
      Check out videos here
       
       
       

      From: John Nuetzel <mnrancher@...>
      To: "IAG-members@yahoogroups.com" <IAG-members@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, March 30, 2012 1:26 PM
      Subject: [IAG-members] Re: Promotion



      Everyone should listen to Lloyd and JES. They have both worked every corner of this sufferable business. My own experience is that I tired of three hour trips to bookstores run by gum smacking teenagers who forgot that I was coming and had no chairs nor electrical outlets. A couple of B&N stores were notable exceptions, Ladue and Fenton, Missouri.
      On the other subject, ever since our history born in romance, this has been a group civil beyond belief. I am very proud of that and want it to continue. Everyone with an interest in the written word and the mechanics of sharing it is welcome. But please keep your opinions on anything else to thyself. Otherwise speak out. Thanks.



       
      Author of
      The Low January Sun
      Murder in March Commons
      2027, New Madrid, Missouri
      The Bower Bird and Other Stories
      And just released -- Telephoto
      http://www.nuetzel.webs.com
      http://www.myspace.com/nuetzel
      http://www.facebook.com/nuetzel
      http://www.facefook.com/nuetzelfans












    • Kris Jackson
      Whatever it is we re doing, and channeling I suppose is as good a word as any. I just re-read a passage I wrote last night. Reading stuff you ve written is
      Message 37 of 37 , Apr 5 11:56 AM
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        "Whatever it is we're doing, and 'channeling' I suppose is as good a word as any."

        I just re-read a passage I wrote last night. Reading stuff you've written is a necessary step, but also a very satisfying one. It can also be distressing: "I said the opposite of what I wanted to say! How did I do that"

        My protagonist and narrator owns a slave, Columbia. She is autistic and fairly helpless. She had been seized by Confederates during a battle. After a great deal of trouble and several days he finds her. Other colored women had been seized by the Rebels -- they are invading the Union and plundering -- and these had been put to work cooking and cleaning. Columbia can't do any of these tasks and had been put to other uses. When Carter finds her, she is in a tent, naked, battered and bruised, with cuts and scratches all over her.

        Carter takes charge of her and brings her home. He is quite upset. I do not describe the thoughts in his head or his emotions, nor does he, except in the most general terms. He does mention that he is quite angry, quite upset, but that's all. I think that by restricting his (and my) reaction to this terrible scene it adds to the emotion the reader is expected to feel.

        Part of this restriction I am exercising is based on advice Leonardo da Vinci gave: "Painters, to achieve unity in your composition, restrict your palette." -- that is, use a limited number of colors. But it's also based on the setting. This is nineteenth-century America, and race and slavery were viewed differently. Blacks were less than human, not just as a practical matter but as a matter of law. When Carter hears and sees abuses of colored people, his reaction is tempered by the fact that this is the way it has always been and, presumably, will always be.

        This is part of the challenge of "channeling" a character. They are not just extensions of our minds, and they are not even necessarily like the people we see around us. People of a different time and place do, indeed, think differently than we do.

        --Kris Jackson

        Author of Above theFray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps

        774-276-0116


        On 4/5/2012 1:52 PM, Katherine Ashe Wynne wrote:
        Pat,
        Sometimes it certainly is fun. Most of the time. Whatever it is we're doing, and "channeling' I suppose is as good a word as any.

        Poe wasn't fun -- deeply depressing. One Poe scholar, I was told, became so deeply depressed he had to take an extended trip to Europe to get over the research. The essence of the problem is that the finest of writers may starve to death trying to get his work into print. At least we don't have to worry about that anymore with the new systems of self-publishing and Amazon distribution. Rejoice!

        Sort of a propos: The room that "An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe" played in at The Waverly Inn was notoriously haunted -- supposedly by a gentleman in a dark hat. The morning after the first performance, when the restaurant staff arrived they found chairs overturned; a vase that had been on the mantle piece was smashed in the fireplace; and the computer, in another room , by the bar, was crashed. There were no further 'objections' after that, but for Poe's birthday we ended the show with a seance. From that I can report that Poe and Virginia are happy together, observing our world and glad not to be here. So there's "the latest". Among the Poe readings in the play was "Monos and Oona," which is about the life between incarnations, so we had to try a seance, didn't we?
        On Apr 3, 2012, at 2:13 PM, plblair@... wrote:

         Katherine ...
        That is indeed what I mean when I talk about "chronicling" my characters! It's wonderful to meet a kindred spirit.
        Yeah, I get in that zone in writing where I totally lose track of time, and everything is just flowing ... coming together ... and I don't have to consciously think about how my characters are acting - or reacting. I can just see them in my mind.
        I sometimes think of it in terms of "channeling" these characters. I can see it in your case - You spent 16 hours channeling Poe! How absolutely awesome!
        And ...
        Isn't it fun????

         Pat

         www.plblairportals.com
        http://blog.plblairportals.com

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Katherine Ashe Wynne [mailto:kateashe@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, April 3, 2012 01:52 PM
        To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [IAG-members] where do the characters come from?

        Hello Pat,
        Indeed, what Are we doing all that time? Though I have an excellent sense of time usually, when I'm writing first draft I lose any sense of time whatsoever, commonly spending 8 to 10 hours at the keyboard. Which is one reason I took to writing late at night -- no interruptions. I had a commission from the NYC Parks Dept/ Historic House Trust to do a one-man play for the Poe Cottage.*

        For months I read everything I could get my hands on about or by Poe, but had no idea what to write. Then one morning I woke up and told my husband not to bother me as I was going to write. I sat down at my computer and got up 16 hours later with a finished play, with no idea of time spent, or even if what I had written made any sense.

        The play, without any changes at all, was a success. Poe scholars asked me where I found the material, thinking I had unearthed some Poe autobiography -- they could not tell the difference between the actual readings from Poe and the mass of created speech for him. My only answer was that I got it where I got all the rest of my plays. Truly I don't know. In a writing experience like that I seem to be taking down dictation. Of course I was laden with research like a bee heavy with pollen. Still -- that does not render an apparently living person --something quite different from their own scholarly work.

        And the Poe play actually runs only about 20 pages (acting time, 1 hour) -- what was I doing for all those 16 hours I spent writing it?

        Is this what you mean when you write of "chronicling" your characters?

        * The play didn't run at the Poe Cottage, as a result of a dispute between the NYC Parks Dept and the Bronx Historical Society, but ran as sold-out dinner theater at The Waverly Inn for 2 1/2 years, until the room it used was converted into a sports bar. Sic transit gloria.

        On Apr 2, 2012, at 5:36 PM, plblair@... wrote:

         I write fiction and have a background in newspaper work, so I have a foot in both worlds. I know the differences between the two, and you're right, Katherine. It's much easier to write a story based on notes from a meeting or an interview than to create the thing whole cloth in my mind. Although I sometimes feel that I'm really just a chronicler of my fictional characters as well ...



        But it's difficult to explain the writing process to those who haven't experienced it. My two sisters are, overall, incredibly supportive of what I do, yet even they sometimes ask, "What are you doing all day?"



        As for animals - two basset hounds, a longhaired dachshund and a tortoiseshell cat. They seldom ask for lap space, but they're all in the room with me as I write, and it's hugely comforting to have them nearby. Plus a great excuse for the occasional break ...


         

        Pat


         
        www.plblairportals.com
        http://blog.plblairportals.com 

         
        -----Original Message-----




        From:



        Katherine Ashe Wynne [mailto:kateashe@...]




        Sent:



        Monday, April 2, 2012 04:05 PM




        To:



        IAG-members@yahoogroups.com




        Subject:



        Re: [IAG-members] readers' imagination



        Kris, it's always a pleasure to read your notes. This one, dealing with the varying of tensions, delicate sensory descriptions and the use of a chapter break suggests you really didn't need anybody's help, just a little cheering along.

        Jesus's remark, about no man is a prophet in his home town, sustains me. How many of us have spouses who, fundamentally, look at the hours we spend at a computer as distracting us from the real business at hand, which is paying attention to them?

        I was brought up having a father who, when he was gazing off blankly, I was made to understand was "working" and was not to be disturbed. So I get very impatient with interruptions. My husband is a journalist, but I've had quite a difficult time trying to make him understand that writing a brief story about something that has an external existence to back up its credibility requires a completely different (and lesser) level of concentration than inventing an entire reality for the reader. And if he interrupts me, I may have to go back ten pages to pick up the thread, and may never get the exact wording again. Which makes me mad. Very unjustly so in his opinion.

        Perhaps this is another topic we might helpfully explore: how to deal with spouses, partners, whoever is there waiting impatiently for us to quit this silliness and pay attention to THEM.

        I hope your cat is all right. I have an ancient little dog on my lap, but I know she's alive because she's wheezing. How many of us write while in physical contact with animals and find that soothing? Even if they wheeze.


        On Apr 2, 2012, at 3:22 PM, Kris Jackson wrote:

        "Pardon me for this jeremiad, but really Kris's initial question, I thought, went right to the heart of writing's purpose and balance."

        Well, thanks. It was really a crie du coeur at the thought of writing a more torrid scene than I'm used to doing. It actually turned out okay. I built up to it with an increase in the tension between the two (coupled with a decrease in the tension preceding it, in which they had to survive a pretty nasty battle and kill a coupla few folks themselves). The explicit details dealt more with the texture, the sights and sounds, of a silk nightgown, and the promise its contents held for my character. Then came an indirect description of the fleshy stuff, then chapter break, then a more or less poetical description of afterglow and pillow talk -- some of which is rather crucial story stuff, though neither my protagonist nor the reader realizes it.

        My wife said, "I wouldn't want to read a love scene written by Kris Jackson." Well, when she heard it was "another stupid Civil War story! You already did one of them!" she had already made that decision. Jesus said it best: "No man is a prophet in his home town." Or words in Aramaic to that effect.

        Thanks to all who weighed in on this and helped me through the agony of these few pages.

        Also, I would like to weigh in on the side issues touched upon in these emails. I found them interesting, and as writers we are all opinionated as hell. I know some of us shy away from controversy. I for one enjoy it. I guess that's because I'm always right.

        I have a Siamese kitten draped across my arm. It seems to be dead, but they're experts at relaxing.





        --Kris Jackson



        Author of Above the Fray, a Novel of the Union Balloon Corps

        774-276-0116





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