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Re: [IAG-members] If it wasn't for Amazon, SP authors and e-books wouldn't...

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  • janet ryan
    Hi, I agree with the book fairs theory.  I have multiple titles as well and do find keeping track of my stock a headache, but it s all part of the challenge
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 1, 2011
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      Hi,
      I agree with the book fairs theory.  I have multiple titles as well and do find keeping track of my stock a headache, but it's all part of the challenge of going it alone.  I di as many book fairs & writers days as I can, but it's not nearly enough to make a living from it.  Mind you, if I become a professional author, what would I do for a hobby?
      Jan Ryan

      From: janetelaine smith <janetelainesmith@...>
      To: "IAG-members@yahoogroups.com" <IAG-members@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, 1 December 2011, 1:12
      Subject: Re: [IAG-members] If it wasn't for Amazon, SP authors and e-books wouldn't...

       
      I have honestly had better results with the big chains (at least a couple of them) than I have in indie bookstores. However, there are some of the indies that have been very good to me. I don't put them in any bookstores on consignment. (I do put some in bed and breakfast places and gift shops on consignment, and I agree--it is a headache.) With any of the bookstores, I just let them know that they are available through either Ingram or Baker & Taylor for a full discount and they are returnable. I get very few returns. I think part of that is that I suggest that they only put a couple of copies on their shelves. I also try to find out what types of books sell the best in their area and suggest ONLY those titles to them. (Since I am also the marketing director for Star Publish, I also suggest appropriate titles by many of our other authors.) My very best sales, though, come from the arts & craft fairs like you mention. I did one every weekend but Thanksgiving weekend all the way from the first of Oct. through the end of November. The least I sold at any of them was 16 and the most was 35. It does make it a real challenge to keep the books in stock, due to having multiple (21) titles. It's something I just have to suffer through. <g>
      Janet
       
      Keith Trilogy now at Omnilit.com
      Keith Trilogy in Kindle now 
      Travel with JES to Venezuela and back here ;
      Just click on the cover of Rebel With a Cause
      Check out videos here
       
       
       

      From: Celia Hayes <clyahayes@...>
      To: "IAG-members@yahoogroups.com" <IAG-members@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 7:03 PM
      Subject: Re: [IAG-members] If it wasn't for Amazon, SP authors and e-books wouldn't...



      Over on one of the Linkedin threads I am following, the discussion is about indy writer's experiences with independent bookstores. Mine have been ... kind of exasperating - to the point where I no longer want to deal with local indy bookstores any more. Either they put my books on their shelves under the usual discount and returnability considerations ... or not. I'm fed up with supplying copies of my books on a consignment basis, then begging them for payment like some kind of charity case. That is unprofessional and insulting. Referring interested buyers to Amazon and Barnes & Noble is my considered fallback  position.
       
      My book sales are a business, not some kind of hobby that I should under-write just for the joy of having my books on their shelves. If I put my books in a venue on consignment, then I would prefer that I be paid promptly upon sales. Amazon, for all the criticisms that might rightly be made of them, is professional in that. I am paid for sales, on the agreed-upon date, and their digital sales are transparent. I don't get any whining about how hard it is for them, and how I should cut them some slack because ... oh, it's a tough business.
       
      Times are tough all over, cupcake. At least, Amazon provides an efficient  platform for sales.  What we do with it, of course, is up to us. I'm out to a community Christmas celebration/craft sale this weekend, to sell my books directly.
       
      And back in the dark ages - the IAG began as a discussion thread on an Amazon forum. Make of that what you will.
       
      Celia Hayes
      Author: Daughter of Texas & The Adelsverein Trilogy
       

      From: cybercobre <editors@...>
      To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 6:13 PM
      Subject: [IAG-members] If it wasn't for Amazon, SP authors and e-books wouldn't...

       
      You know, this Amazon bashing makes me chuckle.

      Amazon.com is a business. As a business, they can and will do what they think is best for that business, and, since you haven't walked a mile in their shoes, you don't have a lot of room to make armchair judgements.

      Amazon.com is run by human beings and computers, which are programmed by human beings. And, guess what? Human beings make mistakes...as any of self-pubbed or trad pubbed author can attest, given that books invariably come out with at least one "oops" in them, be it typo, homonym slip-up, grammatical faux pas, or whatsit.

      This Amazon bashing by self-pubbed (or, PC-speak) "independent" authors and e-book prolificators is equal to the dog biting the hand that feeds it and pissing on the home that gave it a legitimized life. Self-pubbed authors' books and e-books alike would be nowhere near where they are today, gaining a legitimate market share (never mind destroying the trad pub hierarchy, a good thing maybe, and flooding the shelves with so much "dross", a bad thing, that one can't begin to wade through it all) if it weren't for Amazon.com, so, you know, you might want to quit your whining.

      D. L. Keur, The Deepening









    • janetelaine smith
      I miss the good old days when I could actually make a decent living by the magazine writing I used to do. I wrote regularly for a dozen magazines, appearing in
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 1, 2011
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        I miss the good old days when I could actually make a decent living by the magazine writing I used to do. I wrote regularly for a dozen magazines, appearing in each issue. I was the associate editor for one of them and a contributing editor for eight others. Sadly, only one remains. The others have all fallen prey to such things as the economy and the Internet. The last one is fighting for its very life. I wouldn't be at all surprised to see it gone by the end of the year. It would take a ton of book sales to make the amount I earned from that. Still, doing the magazine writing did create a following for my books when they finally were published. Many of my book readers follow me faithfully and read every new book when it comes out.
        I do quite a bit of writing for various online places, but very few of them pay anything. I have tried following some of the "leads" to different paying gigs, but the majority of them end up being scams.
        Janet
         
        Keith Trilogy now at Omnilit.com
        Keith Trilogy in Kindle now 
        Travel with JES to Venezuela and back here ;
        Just click on the cover of Rebel With a Cause
        Check out videos here
         
         
         

        From: janet ryan <baksheeshed1@...>
        To: "IAG-members@yahoogroups.com" <IAG-members@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, December 1, 2011 4:08 AM
        Subject: Re: [IAG-members] If it wasn't for Amazon, SP authors and e-books wouldn't...



        Hi,
        I agree with the book fairs theory.  I have multiple titles as well and do find keeping track of my stock a headache, but it's all part of the challenge of going it alone.  I di as many book fairs & writers days as I can, but it's not nearly enough to make a living from it.  Mind you, if I become a professional author, what would I do for a hobby?
        Jan Ryan

        From: janetelaine smith <janetelainesmith@...>
        To: "IAG-members@yahoogroups.com" <IAG-members@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, 1 December 2011, 1:12
        Subject: Re: [IAG-members] If it wasn't for Amazon, SP authors and e-books wouldn't...

         
        I have honestly had better results with the big chains (at least a couple of them) than I have in indie bookstores. However, there are some of the indies that have been very good to me. I don't put them in any bookstores on consignment. (I do put some in bed and breakfast places and gift shops on consignment, and I agree--it is a headache.) With any of the bookstores, I just let them know that they are available through either Ingram or Baker & Taylor for a full discount and they are returnable. I get very few returns. I think part of that is that I suggest that they only put a couple of copies on their shelves. I also try to find out what types of books sell the best in their area and suggest ONLY those titles to them. (Since I am also the marketing director for Star Publish, I also suggest appropriate titles by many of our other authors.) My very best sales, though, come from the arts & craft fairs like you mention. I did one every weekend but Thanksgiving weekend all the way from the first of Oct. through the end of November. The least I sold at any of them was 16 and the most was 35. It does make it a real challenge to keep the books in stock, due to having multiple (21) titles. It's something I just have to suffer through. <g>
        Janet
         
        Keith Trilogy now at Omnilit.com
        Keith Trilogy in Kindle now 
        Travel with JES to Venezuela and back here ;
        Just click on the cover of Rebel With a Cause
        Check out videos here
         
         
         

        From: Celia Hayes <clyahayes@...>
        To: "IAG-members@yahoogroups.com" <IAG-members@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 7:03 PM
        Subject: Re: [IAG-members] If it wasn't for Amazon, SP authors and e-books wouldn't...



        Over on one of the Linkedin threads I am following, the discussion is about indy writer's experiences with independent bookstores. Mine have been ... kind of exasperating - to the point where I no longer want to deal with local indy bookstores any more. Either they put my books on their shelves under the usual discount and returnability considerations ... or not. I'm fed up with supplying copies of my books on a consignment basis, then begging them for payment like some kind of charity case. That is unprofessional and insulting. Referring interested buyers to Amazon and Barnes & Noble is my considered fallback  position.
         
        My book sales are a business, not some kind of hobby that I should under-write just for the joy of having my books on their shelves. If I put my books in a venue on consignment, then I would prefer that I be paid promptly upon sales. Amazon, for all the criticisms that might rightly be made of them, is professional in that. I am paid for sales, on the agreed-upon date, and their digital sales are transparent. I don't get any whining about how hard it is for them, and how I should cut them some slack because ... oh, it's a tough business.
         
        Times are tough all over, cupcake. At least, Amazon provides an efficient  platform for sales.  What we do with it, of course, is up to us. I'm out to a community Christmas celebration/craft sale this weekend, to sell my books directly.
         
        And back in the dark ages - the IAG began as a discussion thread on an Amazon forum. Make of that what you will.
         
        Celia Hayes
        Author: Daughter of Texas & The Adelsverein Trilogy
         

        From: cybercobre <editors@...>
        To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2011 6:13 PM
        Subject: [IAG-members] If it wasn't for Amazon, SP authors and e-books wouldn't...

         
        You know, this Amazon bashing makes me chuckle.

        Amazon.com is a business. As a business, they can and will do what they think is best for that business, and, since you haven't walked a mile in their shoes, you don't have a lot of room to make armchair judgements.

        Amazon.com is run by human beings and computers, which are programmed by human beings. And, guess what? Human beings make mistakes...as any of self-pubbed or trad pubbed author can attest, given that books invariably come out with at least one "oops" in them, be it typo, homonym slip-up, grammatical faux pas, or whatsit.

        This Amazon bashing by self-pubbed (or, PC-speak) "independent" authors and e-book prolificators is equal to the dog biting the hand that feeds it and pissing on the home that gave it a legitimized life. Self-pubbed authors' books and e-books alike would be nowhere near where they are today, gaining a legitimate market share (never mind destroying the trad pub hierarchy, a good thing maybe, and flooding the shelves with so much "dross", a bad thing, that one can't begin to wade through it all) if it weren't for Amazon.com, so, you know, you might want to quit your whining.

        D. L. Keur, The Deepening













      • Katherine Ashe
        Well put, D.L.!
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 2, 2011
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          Well put, D.L.!
          On Nov 30, 2011, at 7:13 PM, cybercobre wrote:

           

          You know, this Amazon bashing makes me chuckle.

          Amazon.com is a business. As a business, they can and will do what they think is best for that business, and, since you haven't walked a mile in their shoes, you don't have a lot of room to make armchair judgements.

          Amazon.com is run by human beings and computers, which are programmed by human beings. And, guess what? Human beings make mistakes...as any of self-pubbed or trad pubbed author can attest, given that books invariably come out with at least one "oops" in them, be it typo, homonym slip-up, grammatical faux pas, or whatsit.

          This Amazon bashing by self-pubbed (or, PC-speak) "independent" authors and e-book prolificators is equal to the dog biting the hand that feeds it and pissing on the home that gave it a legitimized life. Self-pubbed authors' books and e-books alike would be nowhere near where they are today, gaining a legitimate market share (never mind destroying the trad pub hierarchy, a good thing maybe, and flooding the shelves with so much "dross", a bad thing, that one can't begin to wade through it all) if it weren't for Amazon.com, so, you know, you might want to quit your whining.

          D. L. Keur, The Deepening


        • Sensei J. Richard Kirkham B.Sc
          Worst mistake I ve seen them make was deleting 1984 and the CEO apologized for that. Rick   How I Write Professional Sales Letters Price is Going From $8.95
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 3, 2011
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            Worst mistake I've seen them make was deleting 1984 and the CEO apologized for that.

            Rick
             
            How I Write Professional Sales Letters Price is Going From $8.95 to $49.95 Soon!
            Professional Sales Letters Will Be Offered Soon for a Discount Price of $1195.00 

            http://newbieservices.com/HowIWrite/                                  

            From: Katherine Ashe <kateashe@...>
            To: IAG-members@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 1:32 PM
            Subject: Re: [IAG-members] If it wasn't for Amazon, SP authors and e-books wouldn't...



            Well put, D.L.!
            On Nov 30, 2011, at 7:13 PM, cybercobre wrote:

             
            You know, this Amazon bashing makes me chuckle.

            Amazon.com is a business. As a business, they can and will do what they think is best for that business, and, since you haven't walked a mile in their shoes, you don't have a lot of room to make armchair judgements.

            Amazon.com is run by human beings and computers, which are programmed by human beings. And, guess what? Human beings make mistakes...as any of self-pubbed or trad pubbed author can attest, given that books invariably come out with at least one "oops" in them, be it typo, homonym slip-up, grammatical faux pas, or whatsit.

            This Amazon bashing by self-pubbed (or, PC-speak) "independent" authors and e-book prolificators is equal to the dog biting the hand that feeds it and pissing on the home that gave it a legitimized life. Self-pubbed authors' books and e-books alike would be nowhere near where they are today, gaining a legitimate market share (never mind destroying the trad pub hierarchy, a good thing maybe, and flooding the shelves with so much "dross", a bad thing, that one can't begin to wade through it all) if it weren't for Amazon.com, so, you know, you might want to quit your whining.

            D. L. Keur, The Deepening






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