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Komikoo to be on hiatus

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  • hafidzm
    I arrived at PeKOMIKON in PWTC this afternoon just in time to catch the last few minutes of Gilamon s (Lefty, Slaium & Michael) presentation. Thankfully, at
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 12, 2008
      I arrived at PeKOMIKON in PWTC this afternoon just in time to catch the
      last few minutes of Gilamon's (Lefty, Slaium & Michael) presentation.
      Thankfully, at least I managed to catch Komikoo chief editor Roy
      Ablah's informative presentation in its entirety.

      During Gilamon's presentation, I happened to sit in the same row as
      Roy, who introduced himself to me. Not sure how he knew how I looked
      like (I'm trying to have a secret identity but I'm failing miserably),
      but I thought it was nice of him to say hello to me. Well, maybe I was
      just shocked he didn't try to choke me for my criticisms of Komikoo!
      Hehe. (I may yet get killed by Tony at a Powder presentation, so I
      reckon I'm not out of danger.)

      Here's the big news: Komikoo may not be in the market for the next 2
      months. Don't worry, it doesn't mean Komikoo has folded for good; it
      will be relaunched in June (issue no 3) after a re-strategising. During
      the next two months, Roy will be looking for more artists to increase
      its comics inventory.

      He said that he didn't expect much change to Komikoo except perhaps a
      higher page count for comics, as he is now the only writer. (I didn't
      ask where the other writers went 'cos it might be personal)

      He also expected Komikoo to carry comics that were not to "art"-
      sy. "We'll have comics for the masses. Abang Ujang told me that even
      though I wanted to make comics along the lines of 2000AD, I have to be
      realistic and try to tackle the masses. Komikoo cannot have too many
      stories that are too heavy. So we'll have a mixture of heavy and light
      stories."

      In terms of page rates, Komikoo is paying RM80 for a black and white
      page and RM120 for a colour page. Around RM100 for illustrations and
      RM200-RM250 for cover art.

      According to him, so far there have not been many people submitting
      their comics to Komikoo, perhaps because Komikoo doesn't accept fully
      completed comics. Roy prefers to first see a complete synopsis of the
      proposed comic. "The synopses that we usually received have a question
      mark at the end: 'What will happen next?' I want a complete synopsis
      from A to Z, to see the peaks and how the story ends," he said.

      During his presentation, Roy showed Adijin's detailed script
      for "Siapa", but he said it was okay just to send a normal synopsis.

      After Roy gave the greenlight, the artist must then make thumbnails for
      approval.

      He said he wouldn't mind seeing a finished comic being submitted, but
      then the person who submitted it was taking a chance. It would save his
      time and Roy's time for him to first send in a synopsis.

      On the type of stories he was looking for, Roy said he preferred those
      with a Malaysian backdrop. Even if it's a Final Fantasy type stuff, he
      would not want to see a Japanese Final Fantasy. It doesn't mean he's
      only interested in Malay legends; he's also looking for stories on
      Chinese myths.

      It's also not true that Komikoo doesn't want manga-style art. "It's
      okay to do Japanese style, but we don't want something generic," he
      said.

      In fact, Komikoo is planning a manga issue (issue no 6, slated for
      September).

      Roy doesn't mind a continuing series, but he prefers stories that do
      not go on for too long. If the series is running for a while, then at
      least have short story arcs, emulating the TV series concept. I support
      Roy on this 'cos I myself don't like series that go on forever with no
      pay-off. In fact, I have difficulty following a lot of the comic series
      in local magazines 'cos I'm only entering into the stories midway; any
      which way, I'd forget what happened in the comic if it's not
      interesting with strong characterisation.

      For artists who do not have a story, Komikoo can provide a script for
      them to draw. But it does NOT accept scripts from writers (yup, I'm
      crying here). He advised writers to find an artist to collaborate with,
      and show him 1 or 2 sample pages.

      On the issue of copyright, Komikoo allows comic creators to keep their
      copyright, and it only holds the publishing right for three years.
      During those three years, the comic creators are free to send another
      comic to another publisher that uses characters from the comic that's
      running in Komikoo! I think that's pretty generous of Komikoo, though I
      wonder whether there's any other publication that's willing to accept a
      comic whose characters currently appear in Komikoo.

      Noradz Productions, Komikoo's publisher, is also planning to launch
      another comics magazine, but Roy said he was in no position to talk
      about it. (I wonder what it'll be. Manga-oriented, perhaps?)

      PeKOMIK president Azhar asked whether Noradz would publish graphic
      novels. Roy said he did have plans to publish graphic novels because
      graphic novels could remain on retailers' shelves longer than
      magazines, but he did not expect this to happen very soon.

      Roy said: "To the artists out there, your future is in graphic novels
      because the shelf life is longer." To this, Ubder (former Umbra Comix
      publisher), who was in the audience, said that monthly publications
      were also important to promote graphic novels.

      One of the ways to launch a publication, like what Ujang did, was to
      flood the market with low-priced magazine, he said.

      "They later could raise the cover price, but by then, people are hooked
      and continue buying. Unfortunately, we (Komikoo) do not have a
      benefactor to pump in enough money to flood the market," he added.

      Roy said he didn't know why very few comic creators tried to draw for
      Komikoo. "We're offering something different from everyone else. Art
      Square (Gempak, etc) is offering manga style and fantasy, and its
      target is more children and teens. We want to gain Art Square's readers
      post-Art Square. We are trying to target adult readers."

      He said it was hard for Komikoo to compete in the market as the market
      was saturated with English comics and manga (original and
      pirated). "The chances of local publications succeeding are low, so
      most are doing it mainly for the passion," Roy said, admitting that
      Komikoo's sales were "not good" although it printed many copies.

      He felt Komikoo's problem might be due to the lack of marketing. It's
      something that Komikoo plans to tackle. So far, in terms of media
      publicity, Komikoo has appeared in The Star's Malay portal, and on
      ntv7's Breakfast Show. This coming Tuesday, do watch TV2 between 8am
      and 9am as Komikoo will be featured.

      Roy said he did not think the X-factor of Art Square's comics magazines
      lay in their comics. It's in selling information. "If they take out the
      information, they'll have a difficult time. It's difficult to sell
      comics on their own."

      I, for one, wish Komikoo and Noradz Productions success.

      I may not have time to review Komikoo #2, but I just wanna take this
      opportunity to say that I like Kromosom's art in "Tra La La la La". I
      think it ranks among his best work.

      And while I'm in a reviewing mood... I saw Team Saladin's part of the
      longest comic banner, and I must say, it's very good. Everyone there --
      Eisu, Aimo, Hanie, Kromosom, Popia, Mel C, Sandra Khoo (did I forget
      anyone?) -- did a great job: not just cartoons but actual comics that
      can be published. If you guys come to PeKOMIKON tomorrow (Sunday), take
      a look at Team Saladin's banner on the right side of Bilik Kedah/Johor.
      it wasn't there today 'cos PeKOMIK team put it up only tonite. In fact,
      you'll also find other completed comic banners in the room if you come
      tomorrow (and you MUST come for the PeKOMIK launch by Lat, plus the
      National Illustrators Conference and the comic artists gathering!).

      Grab yourself the PeKOMIK zine, "Wow!" issue no. 1. It's only RM4.99
      (cheaper than RM5.00!). It has, uh, an article on Mediaseni by me
      (shameless plug). Also it features IceSoul's and Jee Wai's comics,
      among others. (I haven't read "Wow!" yet at this writing 'cos I just
      bought it today myself.)

      Happily, I also managed to get a copy of Fieza's "The Cavaliers #1".
      It's her last copy, apparently. Fieza, if you want me to return it to
      you later, let me know. (in case you don't have a copy for yourself)

      Guys, please, please come tomorrow (PeKOMIKON's last day!) and show
      your support of PeKOMIK!!! (There'll be some food, I hear, and I may
      just bring a bunch of free Marvel/DC comics for you...)
    • noor hafizah
      ^__^ Nah it s ok, the copy is yours. I managed to save it for yah! ^_^ See you soon! And thank you for your support! ^_^V ps - hidup pekomik! :p
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 12, 2008
        ^__^

        Nah it's ok, the copy is yours. I managed to save it for yah! ^_^

        See you soon! And thank you for your support! ^_^V

        ps - hidup pekomik! :p





        --- In IACAScW@yahoogroups.com, "hafidzm" <hafidzm@...> wrote:
        >
        > I arrived at PeKOMIKON in PWTC this afternoon just in time to catch the
        > last few minutes of Gilamon's (Lefty, Slaium & Michael) presentation.
        > Thankfully, at least I managed to catch Komikoo chief editor Roy
        > Ablah's informative presentation in its entirety.
        >
        > During Gilamon's presentation, I happened to sit in the same row as
        > Roy, who introduced himself to me. Not sure how he knew how I looked
        > like (I'm trying to have a secret identity but I'm failing miserably),
        > but I thought it was nice of him to say hello to me. Well, maybe I was
        > just shocked he didn't try to choke me for my criticisms of Komikoo!
        > Hehe. (I may yet get killed by Tony at a Powder presentation, so I
        > reckon I'm not out of danger.)
        >
        > Here's the big news: Komikoo may not be in the market for the next 2
        > months. Don't worry, it doesn't mean Komikoo has folded for good; it
        > will be relaunched in June (issue no 3) after a re-strategising. During
        > the next two months, Roy will be looking for more artists to increase
        > its comics inventory.
        >
        > He said that he didn't expect much change to Komikoo except perhaps a
        > higher page count for comics, as he is now the only writer. (I didn't
        > ask where the other writers went 'cos it might be personal)
        >
        > He also expected Komikoo to carry comics that were not to "art"-
        > sy. "We'll have comics for the masses. Abang Ujang told me that even
        > though I wanted to make comics along the lines of 2000AD, I have to be
        > realistic and try to tackle the masses. Komikoo cannot have too many
        > stories that are too heavy. So we'll have a mixture of heavy and light
        > stories."
        >
        > In terms of page rates, Komikoo is paying RM80 for a black and white
        > page and RM120 for a colour page. Around RM100 for illustrations and
        > RM200-RM250 for cover art.
        >
        > According to him, so far there have not been many people submitting
        > their comics to Komikoo, perhaps because Komikoo doesn't accept fully
        > completed comics. Roy prefers to first see a complete synopsis of the
        > proposed comic. "The synopses that we usually received have a question
        > mark at the end: 'What will happen next?' I want a complete synopsis
        > from A to Z, to see the peaks and how the story ends," he said.
        >
        > During his presentation, Roy showed Adijin's detailed script
        > for "Siapa", but he said it was okay just to send a normal synopsis.
        >
        > After Roy gave the greenlight, the artist must then make thumbnails for
        > approval.
        >
        > He said he wouldn't mind seeing a finished comic being submitted, but
        > then the person who submitted it was taking a chance. It would save his
        > time and Roy's time for him to first send in a synopsis.
        >
        > On the type of stories he was looking for, Roy said he preferred those
        > with a Malaysian backdrop. Even if it's a Final Fantasy type stuff, he
        > would not want to see a Japanese Final Fantasy. It doesn't mean he's
        > only interested in Malay legends; he's also looking for stories on
        > Chinese myths.
        >
        > It's also not true that Komikoo doesn't want manga-style art. "It's
        > okay to do Japanese style, but we don't want something generic," he
        > said.
        >
        > In fact, Komikoo is planning a manga issue (issue no 6, slated for
        > September).
        >
        > Roy doesn't mind a continuing series, but he prefers stories that do
        > not go on for too long. If the series is running for a while, then at
        > least have short story arcs, emulating the TV series concept. I support
        > Roy on this 'cos I myself don't like series that go on forever with no
        > pay-off. In fact, I have difficulty following a lot of the comic series
        > in local magazines 'cos I'm only entering into the stories midway; any
        > which way, I'd forget what happened in the comic if it's not
        > interesting with strong characterisation.
        >
        > For artists who do not have a story, Komikoo can provide a script for
        > them to draw. But it does NOT accept scripts from writers (yup, I'm
        > crying here). He advised writers to find an artist to collaborate with,
        > and show him 1 or 2 sample pages.
        >
        > On the issue of copyright, Komikoo allows comic creators to keep their
        > copyright, and it only holds the publishing right for three years.
        > During those three years, the comic creators are free to send another
        > comic to another publisher that uses characters from the comic that's
        > running in Komikoo! I think that's pretty generous of Komikoo, though I
        > wonder whether there's any other publication that's willing to accept a
        > comic whose characters currently appear in Komikoo.
        >
        > Noradz Productions, Komikoo's publisher, is also planning to launch
        > another comics magazine, but Roy said he was in no position to talk
        > about it. (I wonder what it'll be. Manga-oriented, perhaps?)
        >
        > PeKOMIK president Azhar asked whether Noradz would publish graphic
        > novels. Roy said he did have plans to publish graphic novels because
        > graphic novels could remain on retailers' shelves longer than
        > magazines, but he did not expect this to happen very soon.
        >
        > Roy said: "To the artists out there, your future is in graphic novels
        > because the shelf life is longer." To this, Ubder (former Umbra Comix
        > publisher), who was in the audience, said that monthly publications
        > were also important to promote graphic novels.
        >
        > One of the ways to launch a publication, like what Ujang did, was to
        > flood the market with low-priced magazine, he said.
        >
        > "They later could raise the cover price, but by then, people are hooked
        > and continue buying. Unfortunately, we (Komikoo) do not have a
        > benefactor to pump in enough money to flood the market," he added.
        >
        > Roy said he didn't know why very few comic creators tried to draw for
        > Komikoo. "We're offering something different from everyone else. Art
        > Square (Gempak, etc) is offering manga style and fantasy, and its
        > target is more children and teens. We want to gain Art Square's readers
        > post-Art Square. We are trying to target adult readers."
        >
        > He said it was hard for Komikoo to compete in the market as the market
        > was saturated with English comics and manga (original and
        > pirated). "The chances of local publications succeeding are low, so
        > most are doing it mainly for the passion," Roy said, admitting that
        > Komikoo's sales were "not good" although it printed many copies.
        >
        > He felt Komikoo's problem might be due to the lack of marketing. It's
        > something that Komikoo plans to tackle. So far, in terms of media
        > publicity, Komikoo has appeared in The Star's Malay portal, and on
        > ntv7's Breakfast Show. This coming Tuesday, do watch TV2 between 8am
        > and 9am as Komikoo will be featured.
        >
        > Roy said he did not think the X-factor of Art Square's comics magazines
        > lay in their comics. It's in selling information. "If they take out the
        > information, they'll have a difficult time. It's difficult to sell
        > comics on their own."
        >
        > I, for one, wish Komikoo and Noradz Productions success.
        >
        > I may not have time to review Komikoo #2, but I just wanna take this
        > opportunity to say that I like Kromosom's art in "Tra La La la La". I
        > think it ranks among his best work.
        >
        > And while I'm in a reviewing mood... I saw Team Saladin's part of the
        > longest comic banner, and I must say, it's very good. Everyone there --
        > Eisu, Aimo, Hanie, Kromosom, Popia, Mel C, Sandra Khoo (did I forget
        > anyone?) -- did a great job: not just cartoons but actual comics that
        > can be published. If you guys come to PeKOMIKON tomorrow (Sunday), take
        > a look at Team Saladin's banner on the right side of Bilik Kedah/Johor.
        > it wasn't there today 'cos PeKOMIK team put it up only tonite. In fact,
        > you'll also find other completed comic banners in the room if you come
        > tomorrow (and you MUST come for the PeKOMIK launch by Lat, plus the
        > National Illustrators Conference and the comic artists gathering!).
        >
        > Grab yourself the PeKOMIK zine, "Wow!" issue no. 1. It's only RM4.99
        > (cheaper than RM5.00!). It has, uh, an article on Mediaseni by me
        > (shameless plug). Also it features IceSoul's and Jee Wai's comics,
        > among others. (I haven't read "Wow!" yet at this writing 'cos I just
        > bought it today myself.)
        >
        > Happily, I also managed to get a copy of Fieza's "The Cavaliers #1".
        > It's her last copy, apparently. Fieza, if you want me to return it to
        > you later, let me know. (in case you don't have a copy for yourself)
        >
        > Guys, please, please come tomorrow (PeKOMIKON's last day!) and show
        > your support of PeKOMIK!!! (There'll be some food, I hear, and I may
        > just bring a bunch of free Marvel/DC comics for you...)
        >
      • hafidzm
        Komikoo s website says the new issue will be out next week. Yayyy! :) Check out the cover at: http://komikoo.blogspot.com I m just glad that it is confirmed
        Message 3 of 5 , May 29, 2008
          Komikoo's website says the new issue will be out next week. Yayyy! :)

          Check out the cover at:

          http://komikoo.blogspot.com

          I'm just glad that it is confirmed Komikoo is resuming publication. I
          hope the old readers will return in droves and that it will be much
          more successful!

          I don't wanna see another local comic mag bite the dust, like Jom,
          Blues Selamanya and Powder.
        • hafidzm
          Didn t mean to comment on Komikoo #3, but I just got an email from a zackey_84 and he seems to think that I m in charge of Komikoo: hello bro... i hope next
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 20, 2008
            Didn't mean to comment on Komikoo #3, but I just got an email from a
            zackey_84 and he seems to think that I'm in charge of Komikoo:

            hello bro... i hope next month improve your magazine. 2 month
            tertangguh tau. i think your magazine is over. yelah ari tu janji tak
            ulang lagi pernangguhan dalam penerbitan.

            i have a idea. komikoo magazine di translatekan in english. it's
            meaning buat satu story seperti novel grafik dalam bahasa inggeris.
            and then you can sell your product in asia tenggaralah...

            ok good luck.

            (end of email from Zackey)

            It's kinda funny that someone would mistake me for Roy (the hair
            alone would've set us apart. Hehe). But let's pretend for a bit that
            I'm Roy (but with a combed hair). What would I have done differently
            with Komikoo #3?

            Firstly, there really isn't that much of a difference between issue
            #3 and the previous issues in terms of the dark tone. This scares
            me 'cos I don't think Komikoo has changed enough to attract a wider
            base of readers than it did previously.

            Using Ben as a cover artist is, at some level, inspired. EXCEPT...I
            think even people who like Ben's work will agree that the cover isn't
            one of his better pieces. It's dull compared with his Powder covers.

            As "Roy", I would've asked Ben to re-draw the cover before I would
            publish it. Otherwise, I'd just have someone draw a big red bow
            across the cover (like the bow on top of a birthday gift) and there's
            a small card attached saying something like: "A brand-new Komikoo
            inside!" Of course, it'll have to really be a brand-new Komikoo
            inside and not just hype.

            I'd scrap all those darn names cluttering the cover: Adijin,
            Celestial, Maro, Shah, etc. I'm sure they are nice, talented people
            but I doubt that most of the general reading public have heard of
            them. And even if they have, I doubt that they are a strong enough
            draw like, say, Lat, Ujang, Reggie Lee, Aie, etc.

            Instead of Bernice Chauly, I'd probably have an interview with
            someone who is more popular among youth and put the photo of this
            woman (yes, it has to be a woman) on the cover.

            A two-month hiatus is pretty long (it's actually three months between
            issues, if you think about it), so I wasn't surprised that even
            Azhar, who first published "Siapa" in Urban Comics, mentioned he
            forgot what the story was about! And this is also true with me -- I
            couldn't remember that well what went on previously for both "Siapa"
            and "Hikayat Sebuah Mitos". As "Roy", I would've done something to
            remind readers what had gone on in the last two issues.

            Wordless comic "Mat Skipa" is confusing to me for the most part, and
            I totally didn't get "Bulan, Bintang & Mentari". "Hikayat Dua Pemuda
            dan Gergasi Rimba" (part 1) is a pulp fiction story but without a
            pulp fiction cliffhanger ending, and I would've asked zafran to add
            one or two more pages to ensure that.

            I'd ask Shah to do the opposite for his 8-page "Darah Aram", which I
            feel could've been shortened by half – it took too long to get to
            the "punchline" and anyway, there's no real sense of build-up towards
            it.

            I like Maro's "Seekers", but I don't know whether it works for people
            who are not familiar with the show(s) being parodied. "Ex ex ex wai"
            is perhaps too black a humour, something few people would find funny.

            "Formula Krisis" – the ending is a bit anti-climactic. The last or
            second-to-last panel should've been the panel with the mutated babies.

            "Hantu Rempit" is weird, but it works at a certain level. I would not
            have shown the accident. The humour, to me, is really that the ghost
            could not move from the spot of the accident and is just pretending
            to zoom.

            "Cinta Tekno" may be my favourite comic in this issue of Komikoo.
            It has an international feel to it. But I would've put the man on the
            left in that last panel so that the woman's reaction comes AFTER the
            readers have read the man's words.

            "Kultus Kucing Hitam" is too weird for words. "Obesia" is promising,
            and hopefully it'll continue its slightly-controversial train of
            thought.

            "Nujum Pak Cuaca"'s punchline is kinda weak when compared against the
            dark humour at the very start of the comic, when a person is thrown
            off the roof. Why was the "accident" introduced at all if it had no
            bearing on what happened afterward?

            "Wawansabda bersama Bernice Chauly" -- I would've included one of her
            poems to give readers a taste of her "Book of Sins." Of course, I may
            not have chosen Chauly to interview in the first place 'cos she's
            probably below the radar of the large non-yuppie, non-high-art
            segment of the market.

            I'm being quite critical here, but I do respect what Roy and the
            Komikoo team are doing. I don't envy Roy 'cos his job is really
            tough, and in the past, more experienced people have failed to
            sustain comic magazines.

            There is a need to balance commercial viability with personal vision
            and artists' egos.

            The Olympics is coming, and hopefully, the upcoming Komikoo will take
            advantage of the fever that'll grip the public. (The "oo"
            in "Komikoo", for instance, can be turned into the Olympic rings. But
            I'm sure the Komikoo team can be even more creative.)
          • hafidz mahpar
            Just to add to what I said about the possibility of using the Olympics as a theme for Komikoo: I think this is as good a time as ever to try getting
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 20, 2008
              Just to add to what I said about the possibility of using the Olympics as a theme for Komikoo: I think this is as good a time as ever to try getting advertisers for Komikoo. Advertisers' spending normally spike during big events like the Olympics, and I reckon they'll be looking for opportunities to gain eyeballs in August.

              Have a good marketing/creative plan for an Olympics issue, and then approach the media planning and buying agencies with a special deal. Perhaps an ad. Perhaps a contest tie-in. Perhaps an advertorial, suitable for sports brands like adidas and Nike, or Olympics sponsors. Perhaps Komikoo artists can appear at one of the advertiser's events in return for the ad ringgit.

              I think it'll be easier for Komikoo to get advertisers once they see that others have advertised in the magazine (even if it's a Noradz in-house ad).

              On another note, it's tempting to listen to people saying it's good to follow your vision and to make the comics very cerebral. Firstly, it's not a requirement for an intelligent comic/article to alienate readers by using bombastic words or references that are too obscure for the public.

              You don't have to get the symbolisms in, say, "Watchmen" to enjoy the comic. "Y: The Last Man" and "Pride of Baghdad" get across some commentaries without trying to sound overly clever or pompous. If an ordinary man or woman doesn't "get" your comic, it doesn't mean they don't like or don't understand "intelligent" or "serious" comics. It just means you've failed to grab and keep their attention. And it may also mean that your comic is not as intelligent (or entertaining) as you think in the first place.

              Secondly, you can follow your vision but have a longer term strategy to reach it. You don't have to start off with very cerebral comics but instead try to gain a base of readers first. Then gradually, you can introduce stuff that is more in line with your overall vision. Sometimes, you have to follow market trend (or seem to follow market trend) before you can become a leader.

              I think Komikoo overshoots a bit its target of getting readers who have just left Gempak. The comics seem more for an audience in the late 20's or in the 30's. You know you've overshot the target when Ubder (Shahrin) says in the Pergh forum that it's the kind of comics he would've himself loved to publish! Hehe.

              Anyway, that's my opinion, and of course, everyone is very welcome to give opposing views.
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