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Prairie butterflies

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  • dws1108@aol.com
    Frank Olsen, Jerry Selby and I were on Anderson and Cayler prairies Monday and Tuesday. The weather was perfect. The were very few butterflies of any sort and
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 1, 2004
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      Frank Olsen, Jerry Selby and I were on Anderson and Cayler prairies Monday and Tuesday. The weather was perfect. The were very few butterflies of any sort and only S. idalia for a prairie species. We visited a prairie pasture near Peterson and found many butterflies and good diversity. The difference was striking.
      Dennis Schlicht
    • Dennis Schlicht
      During the last 2 week Frank Olsen, Dennis Schlicht and Jerry Selby surveyed about 68 managed prairie sites in Iowa and Mn below the Mn river, for prairie
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 5, 2007
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        During the last 2 week Frank Olsen, Dennis Schlicht and Jerry Selby surveyed
        about 68 managed prairie sites in Iowa and Mn below the Mn river, for
        prairie obgligate butterflies. Of those about 40 had former records for the
        poweshiek skipper. The results are grim and predicted.

        Poweshiek, 2 sites in Iowa down from about 30. One prairie and one road
        ditch. 2 sites for Mn.
        Arogos skipper (Iowa Skipper) 1 site in Iowa. 1 site in Mn.
        Dakota Skipper, 0 in Iowa, 4 sites in Mn.
        Melissa Blue, none.
        Prairie ringlet, none.
        Ottoe Skipper, none
        Regal Fritiillary, 8 in Iowa, Mn ?

        This is preliminary data and will change a bit.

        Bad news for us all but especially for the Powesheik County group. (Harlan
        etal)

        Dennis Schlicht

        _________________________________________________________________
        Local listings, incredible imagery, and driving directions - all in one
        place! http://maps.live.com/?wip=69&FORM=MGAC01
      • Mark Leoschke
        Hello, The regal fritillary is certainly doing better than 8 sites in Iowa. Daryl Howell mentioned to me yesterday that he has been getting a number of
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 6, 2007
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          Hello,

          The regal fritillary is certainly doing better than 8 sites in Iowa. Daryl Howell mentioned to me yesterday that he has been getting a number of reports for the species this year. John Pearson saw at least 10 on an 8 acre prairie remnant in eastern Pottawattamie County last week. I saw 2 on a prairie remnant in southwest Floyd County on the 4th of July. I think the question is not so much how many populations of the regal fritillary occur in Iowa, but how many viable populations occur in our state.

          Mark


          >>> "Dennis Schlicht" <DWS1108@...> 7/5/2007 6:05 PM >>>
          During the last 2 weeks Frank Olsen, Dennis Schlicht and Jerry Selby surveyed
          about 68 managed prairie sites in Iowa and Mn below the Mn river, for
          prairie obgligate butterflies. Of those about 40 had former records for the
          poweshiek skipper. The results are grim and predicted.

          Poweshiek, 2 sites in Iowa down from about 30. One prairie and one road
          ditch. 2 sites for Mn.
          Arogos skipper (Iowa Skipper) 1 site in Iowa. 1 site in Mn.
          Dakota Skipper, 0 in Iowa, 4 sites in Mn.
          Melissa Blue, none.
          Prairie ringlet, none.
          Ottoe Skipper, none
          Regal Fritiillary, 8 in Iowa, Mn ?

          This is preliminary data and will change a bit.

          Bad news for us all but especially for the Powesheik County group. (Harlan
          etal)

          Dennis Schlicht

          _________________________________________________________________
          Local listings, incredible imagery, and driving directions - all in one
          place! http://maps.live.com/?wip=69&FORM=MGAC01
        • ttorwig@aol.com
          Mark: I think if you reread Dennis email, you will see he was referring to how many of the 68 sites that they surveyed showed evidence of Regal Fritillaries,
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 6, 2007
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            Mark:
             
            I think if you reread Dennis' email, you will see he was referring to how many of the 68 sites that they surveyed showed evidence of Regal Fritillaries, not how many total. Certainly anecdotal records will exist for other prairies for the Regal, particularly in the Loess Hills. Given the crash of the species nationwide, though, periodic (annual?) statewide inventories would seem important. Are they being done?
             
            The more important question before us at present is whether prairie-restricted species no longer found in the Loess Hills (dacotae, arogos, poweshiek) and some of the wetland species are viable--even for another decade--on the managed remnants elsewhere.
             
            Quick question: I've been out of the state for a number of years. Has Hesperia dacotae been declared extirpated? What would be the conditions under which that determination occurs?
             
            Tim Orwig
            Boston University




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          • Dennis Schlicht
            What i may not have made clear is that the Regal is in 8 of the 30 prairie sites surveyed. Dennis ...
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 6, 2007
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              What i may not have made clear is that the Regal is in 8 of the 30 prairie
              sites surveyed.
              Dennis


              >From: "Mark Leoschke" <Mark.Leoschke@...>
              >Reply-To: IA-BTRFLY@yahoogroups.com
              >To: <IA-BTRFLY@yahoogroups.com>
              >Subject: Re: [IA-BTRFLY] Prairie butterflies
              >Date: Fri, 06 Jul 2007 08:36:40 -0500
              >
              >Hello,
              >
              >The regal fritillary is certainly doing better than 8 sites in Iowa. Daryl
              >Howell mentioned to me yesterday that he has been getting a number of
              >reports for the species this year. John Pearson saw at least 10 on an 8
              >acre prairie remnant in eastern Pottawattamie County last week. I saw 2 on
              >a prairie remnant in southwest Floyd County on the 4th of July. I think
              >the question is not so much how many populations of the regal fritillary
              >occur in Iowa, but how many viable populations occur in our state.
              >
              >Mark
              >
              >
              > >>> "Dennis Schlicht" <DWS1108@...> 7/5/2007 6:05 PM >>>
              >During the last 2 weeks Frank Olsen, Dennis Schlicht and Jerry Selby
              >surveyed
              >about 68 managed prairie sites in Iowa and Mn below the Mn river, for
              >prairie obgligate butterflies. Of those about 40 had former records for the
              >poweshiek skipper. The results are grim and predicted.
              >
              >Poweshiek, 2 sites in Iowa down from about 30. One prairie and one road
              >ditch. 2 sites for Mn.
              >Arogos skipper (Iowa Skipper) 1 site in Iowa. 1 site in Mn.
              >Dakota Skipper, 0 in Iowa, 4 sites in Mn.
              >Melissa Blue, none.
              >Prairie ringlet, none.
              >Ottoe Skipper, none
              >Regal Fritiillary, 8 in Iowa, Mn ?
              >
              >This is preliminary data and will change a bit.
              >
              >Bad news for us all but especially for the Powesheik County group. (Harlan
              >etal)
              >
              >Dennis Schlicht
              >
              >_________________________________________________________________
              >Local listings, incredible imagery, and driving directions - all in one
              >place! http://maps.live.com/?wip=69&FORM=MGAC01
              >
              >

              _________________________________________________________________
              http://liveearth.msn.com
            • credwards@aol.com
              This is disturbing news.? Forgive my ignorance for asking a lot of questions, but do we know what is causing these apparent declines, and can anything be done
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 6, 2007
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                This is disturbing news.  Forgive my ignorance for asking a lot of questions, but do we know what is causing these apparent declines, and can anything be done about?  Is it already too late?
                 
                I believe it has been suggested previously that the overuse of fire as a prairie management tool could be a contributing factor.  Is this believed to be the primary cause?  Has this been considered and addressed by land managers at the state or county level, and if not, why not?  Are there other contributing factors?  Are the declines occurring on a wider geographic scale than this region of IA-MN?

                Is there anyone at the DNR who is concerned in an official capacity about butterfly populations?  Are there any monitoring or management efforts underway to study why these rapid population declines seem to be occurring, whether they could be reversed, and whether they could be prevented at other sites and for other species?
                 
                Chris Edwards


                -----Original Message-----
                From: Dennis Schlicht <DWS1108@...>
                To: IA-BTRFLY@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Fri, 6 Jul 2007 12:26 pm
                Subject: Re: [IA-BTRFLY] Prairie butterflies

                What i may not have made clear is that the Regal is in 8 of the 30 prairie
                sites surveyed.
                Dennis

                >From: "Mark Leoschke" <Mark.Leoschke@ dnr.state. ia.us>
                >Reply-To: IA-BTRFLY@yahoogrou ps.com
                >To: <IA-BTRFLY@yahoogrou ps.com>
                >Subject: Re: [IA-BTRFLY] Prairie butterflies
                >Date: Fri, 06 Jul 2007 08:36:40 -0500
                >
                >Hello,
                >
                >The regal fritillary is certainly doing better than 8 sites in Iowa. Daryl
                >Howell mentioned to me yesterday that he has been getting a number of
                >reports for the species this year. John Pearson saw at least 10 on an 8
                >acre prairie remnant in eastern Pottawattamie County last week. I saw 2 on
                >a prairie remnant in southwest Floyd County on the 4th of July. I think
                >the question is not so much how many populations of the regal fritillary
                >occur in Iowa, but how many viable populations occur in our state.
                >
                >Mark
                >
                >
                > >>> "Dennis Schlicht" <DWS1108@msn. com> 7/5/2007 6:05 PM >>>
                >During the last 2 weeks Frank Olsen, Dennis Schlicht and Jerry Selby
                >surveyed
                >about 68 managed prairie sites in Iowa and Mn below the Mn river, for
                >prairie obgligate butterflies. Of those about 40 had former records for the
                >poweshiek skipper. The results are grim and predicted.
                >
                >Poweshiek, 2 sites in Iowa down from about 30. One prairie and one road
                >ditch. 2 sites for Mn.
                >Arogos skipper (Iowa Skipper) 1 site in Iowa. 1 site in Mn.
                >Dakota Skipper, 0 in Iowa, 4 sites in Mn.
                >Melissa Blue, none.
                >Prairie ringlet, none.
                >Ottoe Skipper, none
                >Regal Fritiillary, 8 in Iowa, Mn ?
                >
                >This is preliminary data and will change a bit.
                >
                >Bad news for us all but especially for the Powesheik County group. (Harlan
                >etal)
                >
                >Dennis Schlicht
                >
                >___________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
                >Local listings, incredible imagery, and driving directions - all in one
                >place! http://maps. live.com/ ?wip=69&FORM= MGAC01
                >
                >

                ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                http://liveearth. msn.com


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              • Grantridge@aol.com
                Thanks, Chris Edwards, for those good questions. I d be very interested in answers also. I ve seen regal fritillaries on two prairie remnants in Story
                Message 7 of 8 , Jul 6, 2007
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                  Thanks, Chris Edwards, for those good questions.  I'd be very interested in answers also.
                   
                  I've seen regal fritillaries on two prairie remnants in Story County in the past two weeks.  I saw at least two regals on each site, but I don't know if they were all males.  One site was south of Nevada, and the other was east of Cambridge.
                   
                  ch
                   
                   
                  Cindy Hildebrand
                  grantridge@...
                  57439 250th St.
                  Ames, IA  50010
                  515-232-3807

                  "There seemed to be little bird song here today, except for a few feeble strains from a warbling vireo. Of this species our own favorite memory is of certain summer morning hours, when we listened to its fluent song in a fine old orchard, on the edge of an Iowa town, and watched its charming movements to and from the dainty pendent nest." (Selden Lincoln Whitcomb, describing the "main street" of Mason City, Iowa in 1907)




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                • Shepherd, Stephanie [DNR]
                  Hi - Just wanted to address some of Chris questions particularly those about what the DNR has been up to regarding these important issues. Most directly we
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jul 9, 2007
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                    Hi –

                     

                    Just wanted to address some of Chris’ questions particularly those about what the DNR has been up to regarding these important issues.

                     

                    Most directly we have in the past few years funded two research projects.  The first project that is finished looked at butterfly response to burning, grazing, and a combination of burning and grazing in the Loess hills.  This research should be published in the next year or so.  The researcher did find a good number of Ottoe skippers and a whole horde of regals in the Broken Kettle, Five Ridge Prairie area. The second project is currently going on and is looking at butterfly and other insect response to a patch burn grazing system in southern Iowa (the Ringgold County area).

                     

                    We also have in place two monitoring crews working intensively on 30 different locations. This will be expanded a little more each year. Anyway, the crews rigorously survey all the sites for a number of different taxanomic groups, butterflies being one of them.  The way the butterfly protocol is set up allows for observers to hopefully pick up on any rare species on a property but also monitor the site for population fluctuations among all species.  For more info about this Multi-Species Inventory and Monitoring project and a copy of all the protocols go here: http://www.iowadnr.com/wildlife/diversity/inventory_monitoring.html

                     

                    You also may have heard of Iowa’s Wildlife Action Plan – which identified all of our species of greatest conservation need, evaluated the threats to them and their habitats and set forth a 25 year plan for addressing all these threats.  We are getting ready to hire an Implementation Coordinator for this plan whose job it will be to bring together representatives from all the major conservation groups in the state with the sole purpose of making sure that all of the goals set forth in the plan are accomplished cooperatively.  You can check out the plan at: http://www.iowadnr.com/wildlife/diversity/plan.html

                     

                    And finally, I’m actually scheduled to give a talk later this week at the Iowa Preserve manager’s training on prairie management for butterflies where I plan to discuss all the issues concerning the various management techniques and the impact they have on butterflies particularly our species of greatest conservation need. 

                     

                    So while it doesn’t seem to be enough as they still seem to be declining, the plight of these species is on the DNR’s radar screen.  Habitat fragmentation and loss are absolutely the biggest challenges to these (and really most declining) species and it is the main reason management is such a concern. And since for most of these species we can not produce the proper habitat out of thin air, management is what we’ll have to work with. 

                     

                    Hope that helps answer some of the questions.

                     

                    Stephanie Shepherd

                    Iowa DNR Wildlife Diversity Program

                    Boone Wildlife Research Station

                    1436 255th St., Boone , IA 50036

                    515-432-2823 x 102 (phone)

                    515-432-2835 (fax)

                    stephanie.shepherd@...


                    From: IA-BTRFLY@yahoogroups.com [mailto: IA-BTRFLY@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of credwards@...
                    Sent: Friday, July 06, 2007 1:33 PM
                    To: IA-BTRFLY@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [IA-BTRFLY] Prairie butterflies

                     

                    This is disturbing news.  Forgive my ignorance for asking a lot of questions, but do we know what is causing these apparent declines, and can anything be done about?  Is it already too late?

                     

                    I believe it has been suggested previously that the overuse of fire as a prairie management tool could be a contributing factor.  Is this believed to be the primary cause?  Has this been considered and addressed by land managers at the state or county level, and if not, why not?  Are there other contributing factors?  Are the declines occurring on a wider geographic scale than this region of IA-MN?

                     

                    Is there anyone at the DNR who is concerned in an official capacity about butterfly populations?  Are there any monitoring or management efforts underway to study why these rapid population declines seem to be occurring, whether they could be reversed, and whether they could be prevented at other sites and for other species?

                     

                    Chris Edwards



                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Dennis Schlicht <DWS1108@msn. com>
                    To: IA-BTRFLY@yahoogrou ps.com
                    Sent: Fri, 6 Jul 2007 12:26 pm
                    Subject: Re: [IA-BTRFLY] Prairie butterflies

                    What i may not have made clear is that the Regal is in 8 of the 30 prairie
                    sites surveyed.
                    Dennis

                    >From: "Mark Leoschke" <
                    href="mailto:Mark.Leoschke%40dnr.state.ia.us">Mark.Leoschke@ dnr.state. ia.us>
                    >Reply-To: IA-BTRFLY@yahoogrou ps.com
                    >To: <IA-BTRFLY@yahoogrou ps.com>
                    >Subject: Re: [IA-BTRFLY] Prairie butterflies
                    >Date: Fri, 06 Jul 2007 08:36:40 -0500
                    >
                    >Hello,
                    >
                    >The regal fritillary is certainly doing better than 8 sites in
                    w:st="on"> Iowa . Daryl
                    >Howell mentioned to me yesterday that he has been getting a number of
                    >reports for the species this year. John Pearson saw at least 10 on an 8
                    >acre prairie remnant in eastern Pottawattamie
                    County last week. I saw 2 on
                    >a prairie remnant in southwest Floyd
                    County on the 4th of July. I think
                    >the question is not so much how many populations of the regal fritillary
                    >occur in Iowa ,
                    but how many viable populations occur in our state.
                    >
                    >Mark
                    >
                    >
                    > >>> "Dennis Schlicht" <
                    href="mailto:DWS1108%40msn.com">DWS1108@msn. com> 7/5/2007 6:05 PM
                    >>>
                    >During the last 2 weeks Frank Olsen, Dennis Schlicht and Jerry Selby
                    >surveyed
                    >about 68 managed prairie sites in Iowa
                    and Mn below the Mn river, for
                    >prairie obgligate butterflies. Of those about 40 had former records for the
                    >poweshiek skipper. The results are grim and predicted.
                    >
                    >Poweshiek, 2 sites in Iowa
                    down from about 30. One prairie and one road
                    >ditch. 2 sites for Mn.
                    >Arogos skipper (Iowa Skipper) 1 site in
                    w:st="on">Iowa . 1 site in Mn.
                    >Dakota Skipper, 0 in Iowa ,
                    4 sites in Mn.
                    >Melissa Blue, none.
                    >Prairie ringlet, none.
                    >Ottoe Skipper, none
                    >Regal Fritiillary, 8 in Iowa ,
                    Mn ?
                    >
                    >This is preliminary data and will change a bit.
                    >
                    >Bad news for us all but especially for the
                    w:st="on">Powesheik County group. (Harlan
                    >etal)
                    >
                    >Dennis Schlicht
                    >
                    >___________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
                    >Local listings, incredible imagery, and driving directions - all in one
                    >place!
                    target="_blank">http://maps. live.com/ ?wip=69&FORM= MGAC01
                    >
                    >

                    ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                    http://liveearth. msn.com


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