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RE: [Hydrofoil] Bone head blunders

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  • Jason T. Gunstenson
    Steve, ... I think those were actually rich Corinthian leather seats. ;) Jason _____ From: Hydrofoil@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Hydrofoil@yahoogroups.com] On
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 1, 2005
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      Steve,

       

      >>Lets not forget the naugahyde seats…

       

      I think those were actually “rich Corinthian leather” seats.  ;)

       

           Jason

       


      From: Hydrofoil@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Hydrofoil@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of dummypants26
      Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2005 6:12 PM
      To: Hydrofoil@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Hydrofoil] Bone head blunders

       

      As some of you might have noticed, I've been carrying on a
      conversation about the advantages of having a dive mask in the boat.
      This became obvious to me late last Sun when my wife circled around
      me too close and wrapped the rope around the prop. 10 mins and some
      patience, and I was able to untangle things. Was able to save the no-
      stretch rope but the handle was trashed.

      As I was having this convo, I made the comment that it doesn't take
      much to get yourself into trouble out at the lake. I started to
      reflect back to all the other "situations" I've gotten myself into,
      out at the lake over the years. "Situations" that you can laugh
      about now, but at the time, was cause for some serious pucker
      factor.

      In the name of a laugh, here's what I did.

      When I was about 21(ish), me and one of the guys from my work
      decided to borrow a fellow workers boat and head for the lake. The
      boat had one of those red sparkle paint jobs that was so popular for
      boats from the 70's. It was about a 17 footer with a closed bow that
      you could shove the ski's under, and a 85 horse Merc. Lets not
      forget the naugahyde seats that never seamed to stay upright.

      So, we're at the boat launch and starting to back the boat down the
      ramp. I'm in my truck backing up and my buddy's riding on the tounge
      of the trailer. Why he decided to do this next thing is still beyond
      me! He decides to undo the catch on the ratchet for the crank
      handle. One bump in the ramp, and the handle slippid out of his
      grip, came around and smacked him in the back of the hand. Weight of
      boat + angle of ramp = crank handle light speed! Ever have one of
      those times, when time slows down, allowing you moment to say to
      yourself "hmmmm...there's something you don't see every day!"? I can
      still hear the bzzzzz of the handle. By the time the *%#@ got done
      hitting the fan, all I could see in my rear view mirror was the
      bottom of the bow of the boat. The boat ended up 1/2 on  1/2 off the
      trailer at about a 45 degree angle. Totally mashed up the fiberglass
      at the bottom/back of the boat.

      It was about all a couple of old fishermen could do to keep from
      laughing while they helped us get the boat back on the trailer. Most
      likely had some choice adjectives to descibe us. Worst part is, I
      was thinkin' the same thing about myself. Felt like crawlin' into a
      hole.

      As I look back, I'm greatfull that no one got hurt, and it's good to
      know that I gave those old guys a story to tell that night at the
      bar. Someone's got to be round to make others feel good about
      themselves. Yep....that was me. Bone head!

      So there ya have it! And I'm "sure" that non of you have any simular
      stories to tell. If it's been long enough that you can laugh about
      it, let hear about it.

      d-pants  



    • Steve Landess
      Ever wonder why outboards have BOLTS thru the transom to hold the engine in place?? Way back in 1975, when I was living in the Dallas area, my brother-in-law
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 1, 2005
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        Ever wonder why outboards have BOLTS thru the transom to hold the engine in place??
         
        Way back in 1975, when I was living in the Dallas area, my brother-in-law and I were out skiing one day on Lake Lavon (hello, Geoff !!!). 
         
        During a pause in the action, while sitting still in the water, I suddenly noticed a loud noise, a big splash, and then people yelling for help from a nearby boat. 
         
        We quickly motored over to their boat and noticed that their outboard engine was GONE....
         
        Upon further inspection, the engine wasn't gone, rather it had jumped off the transom of the boat and was submerged behind the boat, held in place ONLY by the power cable.
         
        Trying not to laugh too hard, we tied a rope onto their boat and towed them over to a boat ramp, where it took four of us to lift the engine and put it back on the transom.
         
        I noted to the boat owner that those wingnut bolts aren't enough to hold a six-cylinder Mercury engine in place on the boat, and that once they get the engine cleaned and running again it might be advisable to drill some holes thru the transom and BOLT it to the transom !!!!
         
        By the way:
        I had great fun riding with the Pittsburgh crew (Phil, Margo, Scott (steelerguy), & others) last week - thanks for all the hospitality, guys...
         
        And, to keep on topic, I'm now back at home, headed out to ride on lake Austin this afternoon in this 100+ degree weather - that 70-degree water will feel great! 
         
        <lol>
        Steve
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Wednesday, August 31, 2005 6:11 PM
        Subject: [Hydrofoil] Bone head blunders

        As some of you might have noticed, I've been carrying on a
        conversation about the advantages of having a dive mask in the boat.
        This became obvious to me late last Sun when my wife circled around
        me too close and wrapped the rope around the prop. 10 mins and some
        patience, and I was able to untangle things. Was able to save the no-
        stretch rope but the handle was trashed.

        As I was having this convo, I made the comment that it doesn't take
        much to get yourself into trouble out at the lake. I started to
        reflect back to all the other "situations" I've gotten myself into,
        out at the lake over the years. "Situations" that you can laugh
        about now, but at the time, was cause for some serious pucker
        factor.

        In the name of a laugh, here's what I did.

        When I was about 21(ish), me and one of the guys from my work
        decided to borrow a fellow workers boat and head for the lake. The
        boat had one of those red sparkle paint jobs that was so popular for
        boats from the 70's. It was about a 17 footer with a closed bow that
        you could shove the ski's under, and a 85 horse Merc. Lets not
        forget the naugahyde seats that never seamed to stay upright.

        So, we're at the boat launch and starting to back the boat down the
        ramp. I'm in my truck backing up and my buddy's riding on the tounge
        of the trailer. Why he decided to do this next thing is still beyond
        me! He decides to undo the catch on the ratchet for the crank
        handle. One bump in the ramp, and the handle slippid out of his
        grip, came around and smacked him in the back of the hand. Weight of
        boat + angle of ramp = crank handle light speed! Ever have one of
        those times, when time slows down, allowing you moment to say to
        yourself "hmmmm...there's something you don't see every day!"? I can
        still hear the bzzzzz of the handle. By the time the *%#@ got done
        hitting the fan, all I could see in my rear view mirror was the
        bottom of the bow of the boat. The boat ended up 1/2 on  1/2 off the
        trailer at about a 45 degree angle. Totally mashed up the fiberglass
        at the bottom/back of the boat.

        It was about all a couple of old fishermen could do to keep from
        laughing while they helped us get the boat back on the trailer. Most
        likely had some choice adjectives to descibe us. Worst part is, I
        was thinkin' the same thing about myself. Felt like crawlin' into a
        hole.

        As I look back, I'm greatfull that no one got hurt, and it's good to
        know that I gave those old guys a story to tell that night at the
        bar. Someone's got to be round to make others feel good about
        themselves. Yep....that was me. Bone head!

        So there ya have it! And I'm "sure" that non of you have any simular
        stories to tell. If it's been long enough that you can laugh about
        it, let hear about it.

        d-pants  


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