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Re: [Hybrid] Re: "invisible" producers

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  • Thomas Hansen
    Well, I guess we can all agree that producers CAN have a lot to do with the sound or song, and they can choose not to. In many cases we don t notice who
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 2, 2002
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      Well, I guess we can all agree that producers CAN have a lot to do with the sound or song, and they can choose not to. In many cases we don't notice who produces the music, and other cases we do. Rollo, the guy behaind Faithless has his own stamp on the music he touch, most Faithless Fans know which. The Hybrid guys usually also have a recognizeable sound hidden in the music... Well, you know what I mean. And sometimes we can just hear that it aint the right touch in the music...
      The only example I can think of right now is actually Bonjovi... ( ! ) They usually have a guy called Obie O'brian or something like that as the bands producer, but then on their last album, there was this song IT'S MY LIFE which sounded so... different... Not Bonjovish. And it turns out they used a producer who earlier helped Backstreet Boys do a couple of songs... Therefore the catchy, almost childish pop song that IT'S MY LIFE is... Because of the producer. OK, a bit off topic, but still I was just trying to explain what impact a producer can have.
      In other cases, the producer might choose, or be ordered to do what the band ask him to do, that is the cases where the band is the main men behind their music, and don't want a producer to make their "sound" ( They are unlike Faithless... )

      Well, all my stories lead to the fact: Producers can and can not have a big impact on the sound. But that is up to the people who make that particular song to decide.

      Best regards

      Thomas Hansen
    • propellerheadcase
      I thought Bon Jovi were produced by Desmond Child, they certainly were at one stage. And he has most recently produced Ricky Martin. And Mutt Lange produced
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 2, 2002
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        I thought Bon Jovi were produced by Desmond Child, they certainly
        were at one stage. And he has most recently produced Ricky Martin.
        And Mutt Lange produced Def Leppard and Bryan Adams (let's play spot
        the backing-vocal similarities), AC/DC and Billy Ocean.

        --- In HybridUK@y..., "Thomas Hansen" <thomas_h_18@h...> wrote:
        > The only example I can think of right now is actually Bonjovi...
        ( ! ) They usually have a guy called Obie O'brian or something like
        that as the bands producer, but then on their last album, there was
        this song IT'S MY LIFE which sounded so... different... Not
        Bonjovish. And it turns out they used a producer who earlier helped
        Backstreet Boys do a couple of songs... Therefore the catchy, almost
        childish pop song that IT'S MY LIFE is... Because of the producer.
        OK, a bit off topic, but still I was just trying to explain what
        impact a producer can have.
      • c_chilton
        ... of ... Certainly so! Wow saw an oppurtunity to make a beautiful song and took it. Why deprive us the music listening public the pleasure of ever hearing
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 2, 2002
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          > I don't think that implies
          > they've nullified their talent (taking a look at their entire body
          of
          > work should put that to rest),

          Certainly so! Wow saw an oppurtunity to make a beautiful song and
          took it. Why deprive us the music listening public the pleasure of
          ever hearing such a tune simply because of the 'issues' in taking a
          sample.

          To go even mooooooooore off topic, but still kinnnnnda related, some
          poeple say Fatboy Slim in the biggest plagurist of them all, and what
          he does anybody with half a brain could do. So why don't they?
          Because they can't.

          Personally I think one big element to being a musical maestro is
          vision, in some ways recognising potential in something ordinary
          people would just throw away.. All great musicians (FBS, Wow, etc)
          have this talent, they just use it in different ways at different
          times.

          ummmmm, I know i'm not making any sense now so I'm off :)


          Chuck
        • propellerheadcase
          I used to be in the anti-sample brigade back in my very-metal days but now I see it as an artform that Steinski, Bomb the Bass, DJ Shadow, the Chemical
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 3, 2002
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            I used to be in the anti-sample brigade back in my very-metal days
            but now I see it as an artform that Steinski, Bomb the Bass, DJ
            Shadow, the Chemical Brothers, Fatboy Slim and the Avalanches have
            successively taken to new plateaus. I personally believe it is
            harder to force two samples to co-exist than it is to write two
            complimentary melody lines.

            In Fatboy's case it isn't plagiarism for the simple fact that he's
            not copying a pre-existent idea he is physically copying the original
            material into a new context - that's a BIG difference.

            I had a thought on the whole sampling/copying front the other day:

            No-one would denigrate Beethoven for his use of traditional French
            and Russian music in the '1812 Overture', would they. But he
            certainly sampled/re-contextualised pre-existent material.

            --- In HybridUK@y..., "c_chilton" <c_chilton@y...> wrote:
            > To go even mooooooooore off topic, but still kinnnnnda related,
            some
            > poeple say Fatboy Slim in the biggest plagurist of them all, and
            what
            > he does anybody with half a brain could do. So why don't they?
            > Because they can't.
            >
            > Personally I think one big element to being a musical maestro is
            > vision, in some ways recognising potential in something ordinary
            > people would just throw away.. All great musicians (FBS, Wow, etc)
            > have this talent, they just use it in different ways at different
            > times.
            >
            > ummmmm, I know i'm not making any sense now so I'm off :)
            >
            >
            > Chuck
          • Antti Mutta
            Thanks Vinnie. This makes Blue sort of like the Traffic soundtrack Helicopter tune remixed by WOW. Tasty, yes, but mostly just a good remix and not something
            Message 5 of 10 , Mar 5, 2002
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              Thanks Vinnie. This makes Blue sort of like the Traffic soundtrack Helicopter tune remixed by WOW. Tasty, yes, but mostly just a good remix and not something I'd call an original production. Takes the classic status of this track for me. Notice: FOR ME, so no flaming please.

              It must be fun being an engineer / producer behind some famous DJ. Here's a recent example: in the Parks & Wilson Essential Mix there's an superb tech-house track from Phantom Power aka Rob Rives. Further study using Google reveals the man is Danny Tenaglia's engineer. Now, this sounds as he's some sort of coffee unit handler in the studio, whereas you should be reading: the man BEHIND remixes and productions, which are dubbed Danny Tenaglia productions. Well, money does incredible things to people and their minds.

              -antti

              > Well, many times, the people listed in the credits might be the ones
              > behind the track in it's original form. BT's "Dreaming" existed
              > previously in another form before Kirsty & BT spiced it up for 1999.
              > Of course, BT's greatest tracks have many times been collaborations
              > (not to take away from his original work!). WOW's "The Gift" uses a
              > distinct vocal snippet from Nicole Jackon's "The First Time I Ever
              > Saw Your Face" (used w/ permission). According to the
              > credits, "Blue" appears to be written by David Dundas & Rick
              > Wentworth, but the production is clearly credited to W.O.W. I'm not
              > sure what credits you have, but on the debut album and '97
              > single, "Ajare" is credited to T. Siddique/J. Wisternoff/N. Warren.
              > I can't comment on how much impact the former individual had because
              > I simply don't know, but I suspect it's not much different than the
              > following cases: Putnam & Cruise's role in "If I Survive," "Dreaming
              > Your Dreams," and Putnam's role in "Finished Symphony," just to give
              > a similar example.
              >
              > In each example, I'm sure everyone had a unique influence, and that
              > the impact of said influence varied widely.
              >
              > VH.
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