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Re: [EMHL] Re: A metric theorem on choo-choos

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  • Francois Rideau
    Dear Jeff Do you remember the name of a man who thought that choo-choos were not needed when horses were enough for uniform motions. I remind you what he told
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 30, 2007
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      Dear Jeff
      Do you remember the name of a man who thought that choo-choos were not
      needed when horses were enough for uniform motions.
      I remind you what he told , a long long time ago:

      Hey, you, wait a minute.
      Let's have a good look at you, Mr Choo-Choo.
      It's easy to find you, b.....d!
      I don't have to kill you now.
      You leave a slime behind you like a snail.
      Two beautiful shiny rails....

      Happy New Year
      Francois





      On Dec 30, 2007 5:51 AM, Jeff <cu1101@...> wrote:

      > Dear Francois and dear friends,
      >
      > What I find flawed here is the need for the trains to move with
      > uniform motion. I really don't understand the need for uniform
      > motion of the choo-choo trains.
      >
      > Sincerely, Jeff
      >
      > .
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jeff
      Dear Francois, [FR] Of course this configuration is well known. Looking at the position of the choo-choos at time t = 0 and time t = 1, we get 3 pairs: (a(0),
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 9, 2008
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        Dear Francois,

        [FR]
        Of course this configuration is well known.
        Looking at the position of the choo-choos at time t = 0 and time t =
        1, we get 3 pairs:
        (a(0), a(1)) on side BC, (b(0), b(1)) on side CA, (c(0), c(1) on side
        AB. Hence we obtain 3 direct similarities:
        1° Sa of center <alpha> sending the pair (b(0), b(1)) on the pair
        (c(0),c(1))
        2° Sb of center <beta> sending the pair (c(0), c(1)) on the pair
        (a(0),a(1))
        3° Sc of center <gamma> sending the pair (a(0), a(1)) on the pair
        (b(0),b(1))

        -----

        I considered the points a(0), b(0) and c(0) as the train engines and
        the points a(1), b(1) and c(1) as the train brake vans. With segments
        a(0)a(1), b(0)b(1) and c(0)c(1) taken as the trains, I was pleased to
        see the invariance of your points T and S as the segment trains moved
        along their respective sidelines. This prompted my comment about the
        trains not needing uniform motion.

        Sincerely, Jeff
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