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Re: High temperature sleeves for laminator rollers?

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  • Lee Studley
    Photos!! :-)
    Message 1 of 15 , Apr 1, 2011
      Photos!! :-)
    • David C. Partridge
      Attached - I will do a write on my website when I find that round tuit Regards, David Partridge ... From: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 15 , Apr 2, 2011
        Attached - I will do a write on my website when I find that "round tuit"


        Regards,
        David Partridge
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lee Studley
        Sent: 01 April 2011 15:52
        To: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Homebrew_PCBs] Re: High temperature sleeves for laminator rollers?

        Photos!! :-)


        ------------------------------------

        Be sure to visit the group home and check for new Links, Files, and Photos:
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Homebrew_PCBsYahoo! Groups Links




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • David C. Partridge
        Attached - I will put a write up on my web site when I find that round tuit Regards, David Partridge ... From: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 15 , Apr 2, 2011
          Attached - I will put a write up on my web site when I find that "round tuit"


          Regards,
          David Partridge
          -----Original Message-----
          From: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of tda7000
          Sent: 31 March 2011 22:50
          To: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Homebrew_PCBs] Re: High temperature sleeves for laminator rollers?

          Sounds good! Do you have photos?

          --- In Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com, "David C. Partridge" <david.partridge@...> wrote:
          >
          > SUCCESS!!!
          >
          > I couldn't get a PFA heat shrink, and the prices are pretty horrific anyhow, so I came up with a "Plan B".
          >
          > I purchased a 5 meter length of Croylek's "Revitex VSR10 Expandable Glass Sleeving" in the 10mm size from RS Components - their stock number 668-1295. This will expand to a nominal 22mm inside diameter. Wall thickness about 0.85mm, and operating temperature range of -70°C to +300°C. Short term peaks of up to +450°C
          >
          > I also bought a 1 meter length of NTTR380CLEAR from CPL Ness Heat Shrink. This is PTFE heat shrink tubing with an unshrunk diameter of 38mm and a 4:1 shrink ratio, and 0.38mm thickness. It has a nominal working temperature range of -65°C to +260°C. Perfect for the job, but does come with a built-in GBP27.60 (about USD40) sticker shock for 1 meter including postage! Details here:
          >
          > <http://www.nessheatshrink.co.uk/products.php?pid=8>
          >
          > The roller was originally 1" before the silicone rubber came off, and 21.4mm after cleaning off the remnants.
          >
          > I fitted two layers of the VSR10 glass braid sleeving, and ensured it was pulled tight onto the rollers. I then fitted the NTTR 380 heat shrink on top with a generous allowance for lengthwise shrinkage (the data-sheet suggests 20%). The two rollers with the three layers on were then put in the domestic oven set for 250°C in fan oven mode.
          >
          > Once they were well and truly heat soaked, I used a hot air gun to shrink the outer cover onto the rollers. Several trips back to the oven were needed to keep the whole thing hot while shrinking the PTFE (the preheating helps to avoid wrinkling of the coating through heat loss to the rollers). Thick oven mittens are really helpful here!
          >
          > Once it had all cooled down I trimmed off the excess glass braid and PTFE covering and fitted the rollers back into the modified (*) laminator. The white glass braid had turned a pretty caramel colour as the silicone varnish had suffered a little from the heat, but the varnish isn't needed anyway (at least for this application).
          >
          > The glass braid not only packs the diameter back to the original value (or near enough), but also provides a roughish surface which prevents the PTFE slipping and also provides a degree of "bounce" similar to the original silicone rubber.
          >
          > Several trial runs with increasing temperatures established that a roller temperature of 250°C (as measured with a Pt100 sensor) worked extremely well (needing about 10 passes) with the Laserjet 4050 toner to achieve a good transfer to 1.6mm copper clad PCB.
          >
          > (*) Modification to the thermostat circuit to allow increased temperature range, and removal of the 157°C thermal fuse, as I could not find a high enough rated one to replace it. For safety reasons, please don't leave the modified laminator unattended!!!
          >
          > Dave
          >
          >
          > --- In Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com, "David C. Partridge" <david.partridge@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I think I know what I need, the problem is getting it. The suppliers I've found so far either want huge MOVs or don't stock the size :-(.
          > >
          > > What I want is 3 feet (or 1 meter) of PFA heat-shrink tubing with a wall thickness of 1.6mm to 2mm. Finished (shrunk) size to be just under 22mm.
          > >
          > > Is there anyone out there who can help?
          > >
          > > D.
          > >
          > > --- In Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com, "David C. Partridge" <david.partridge@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > I'm making progress on the high temp. sleeving. I will update the list as and when.
          > > >
          > > > PS A good Google search is "high temperature heat shrink sleeving"
          > > >
          > > > D.
          > > > -----Original Message-----
          > > > From: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com
          > > > [mailto:Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Andrew Hakman
          > > > Sent: 29 March 2011 00:47
          > > > To: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com
          > > > Cc: mlerman@
          > > > Subject: Re: [Homebrew_PCBs] High temperature sleeves for laminator rollers?
          > > >
          > > > Pretty sure the heater is actually a large halogen lamp, that runs at line voltage (hence why there are 120V fusers, and 220V fusers).
          > > >
          > > > Andrew
          > > >
          > > > On Mon, Mar 28, 2011 at 5:35 PM, <mlerman@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > I'm sure it has been done. Just add a mechanical crank and a
          > > > > temperature controller using the built in thermistor and the
          > > > > built in heater (probably
          > > > > 24 VAC) and you're done.
          > > > >
          > > > > Mark
          > > > >
          > > > > -----Original Message-----
          > > > > >From: Erik Knise <elknise@>
          > > > > >Sent: Mar 28, 2011 6:21 PM
          > > > > >To: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com
          > > > > >Subject: Re: [Homebrew_PCBs] High temperature sleeves for
          > > > > >laminator
          > > > > rollers?
          > > > > >
          > > > > >I've looked around only before but haven't seen anything. Also
          > > > > >"high temp laminator" doesn't return man useful search results.
          > > > > >
          > > > > >I know some people have tried to modify a laser printer to
          > > > > >print directly onto PCBs. What about making your own laminator
          > > > > >built around a fuser?
          > > > > >
          > > > > >--
          > > > > >Erik L. Knise
          > > > > >Seattle, WA
          > > > > >
          > > > > >On Sat, Mar 26, 2011 at 9:35 AM, David C. Partridge
          > > > > ><david.partridge@> wrote:
          > > > > >> The technology for high temperature rollers exists as fusers
          > > > > >> run at
          > > > > temperatures above 200C, and in some cases at lot above that.
          > > > > >>
          > > > > >> The rollers on this laminator are 22mm dia, and the sleeves
          > > > > >> about 2mm
          > > > > thick.
          > > > > >>
          > > > > >> Does anyone know where to get new high temperature sleeves,
          > > > > >> and also how
          > > > > they are fitted?
          > > > > >>
          > > > > >> Thanks
          > > > > >> Dave
          > > > > >>
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > >------------------------------------
          > > > > >
          > > > > >Be sure to visit the group home and check for new Links, Files,
          > > > > >and
          > > > > Photos:
          > > > > >http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Homebrew_PCBsYahoo! Groups Links
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > ------------------------------------
          > > >
          > > > Be sure to visit the group home and check for new Links, Files, and Photos:
          > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Homebrew_PCBsYahoo! Groups Links
          > > >
          > >
          >




          ------------------------------------

          Be sure to visit the group home and check for new Links, Files, and Photos:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Homebrew_PCBsYahoo! Groups Links




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • David C. Partridge
          OK, I ve uploaded a set of pictures which should be fairly self-explanatory to the Photo section folder High temperature laminator rollers .
          Message 4 of 15 , Apr 2, 2011
            OK, I've uploaded a set of pictures which should be fairly self-explanatory to the Photo section folder "High temperature laminator rollers".

            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Homebrew_PCBs/photos/album/1380406873/pic/list>

            Hope folks find it useful.

            Dave
            --- In Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com, "David C. Partridge" <david.partridge@...> wrote:
            >
            > There's not much to see really, apart from a possible shot of a completed roller which would be pretty boring.
            >
            > However, I do need to re-do the rollers as the write up I posted earlier was how it should be done. I got bitten by the length-wise shrinkage of the heat shrink, so didn't get PTFE coverage all the way to the ends. If there's enough interest, I could take pictures as I go and post a write up on my web-site.
            >
            > D.
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of tda7000
            > Sent: 31 March 2011 22:50
            > To: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [Homebrew_PCBs] Re: High temperature sleeves for laminator rollers?
            >
            > Sounds good! Do you have photos?
            >
          • tda7000
            These look pretty good... I understand a lot more than I did from your description (not saying your description is bad, but I was bad at understanding it,
            Message 5 of 15 , Apr 4, 2011
              These look pretty good... I understand a lot more than I did from your description (not saying your description is bad, but I was bad at understanding it, mainly due to not understanding what the materials were you are talking about (I do now though!))

              I assume this could be performed on any laminator if one wanted to take the rollers to a hotter temperature than they are designed for...

              250 Degrees, I am surprised it needs to go this high, I wonder why HP decided to use that kind of toner....


              --- In Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com, "David C. Partridge" <david.partridge@...> wrote:
              >
              > Attached - I will do a write on my website when I find that "round tuit"
              >
              >
              > Regards,
              > David Partridge
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lee Studley
              > Sent: 01 April 2011 15:52
              > To: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [Homebrew_PCBs] Re: High temperature sleeves for laminator rollers?
              >
              > Photos!! :-)
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Be sure to visit the group home and check for new Links, Files, and Photos:
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Homebrew_PCBsYahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • David C. Partridge
              The fuser in the printer runs at 205C (plus or minus), so I m not surprised that a laminator needs to run hotter than that to achieve toner transfer. I don t
              Message 6 of 15 , Apr 4, 2011
                The fuser in the printer runs at 205C (plus or minus), so I'm not surprised that a laminator needs to run hotter than that to achieve toner transfer.

                I don't see why you couldn't do this to any laminator if you could work out how to re-work the temperature control circuit as well. This one was easy, just a resistor and a poteniometer to change.

                D.
                -----Original Message-----
                From: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of tda7000
                Sent: 05 April 2011 00:33
                To: Homebrew_PCBs@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [Homebrew_PCBs] Re: High temperature sleeves for laminator rollers?

                :
                :

                I assume this could be performed on any laminator if one wanted to take the rollers to a hotter temperature than they are designed for...

                250 Degrees, I am surprised it needs to go this high, I wonder why HP decided to use that kind of toner....
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