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Slow easy sailing

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  • bobboozm
    I am 70 years old and been around the water and power boats all my life. I live on the water in Southeast Louisiana and have my own boat dock that houses my
    Message 1 of 5 , May 20, 2013
      I am 70 years old and been around the water and power boats all my life. I live on the water in Southeast Louisiana and have my own boat dock that houses my two power boats. Near the end of last Summer I found a Hobie 12 in very good condition, shined it up and took it out on two or three short trips. I did good considering my very limited sailing experience which consists of Sunfish rentals on vacations many years ago. Then Issac came along and ended my sailing for the season, but the boat did survive. I put a large trailer roller on my bulkhead and can slide it in or out the water very easily keeping it at all times rigged and ready to go.

      I am interested in getting advice and tips to prevent capsizing. If/when I do capsize, my life will not be in danger, because I am never more than swimming distance from shore. However, if I don't have to worry about taking a dip in cold water I could extend my season to almost year round. I live on a narrow canal and paddle about 100 yds. to a canal that is easily wide enough for me to sail around. The sail was modified and has rings that allow me to paddle out with the sail down, then raise it on the water and lower it to paddle back. If the wind is right I can sail out and sometimes all the way back. I don't have to worry about traffic and I don't intend to take it out when the wind is higher than I will feel safe in. I took the Hiking strap out because I never intend to use it and replaced it with a flat vinyl and foam pad to kneel on. I learned quickly that it is almost impossible to paddle with a free swinging rudder. I rigged up a bungie cord system that keeps it centered on its own, but has enough play to allow me to steer.

      Any ideas or advice for someone interested in Slow, Easy, Capsize free sailing would certainly be appreciated. Myrtle Grove Bob
    • Scot Spencer
      I cannot give you specifics on avoiding capsize in a Hobie/Holder 12 but I do highly recommend taking the sailboat out with someone else in a power boat nearby
      Message 2 of 5 , May 21, 2013
        I cannot give you specifics on avoiding capsize in a Hobie/Holder 12 but I do highly recommend taking the sailboat out with someone else in a power boat nearby (or at least on shore watching with access to a power boat) and capsize it on purpose in order to understand how to recover (right the boat & climb back in) if there is ever a point in time when you do capsize...better to learn in a controlled environement.

        Also, since you say you are keeping the boat rigged, be sure to cover the sail so the sun does not damage it.

        Scot
        Great Lakes Bay Region






        ________________________________
        From: bobboozm <BOBBOOZM@...>
        To: Holder12@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, May 20, 2013 3:55 PM
        Subject: [Holder12] Slow easy sailing



         
        I am 70 years old and been around the water and power boats all my life. I live on the water in Southeast Louisiana and have my own boat dock that houses my two power boats. Near the end of last Summer I found a Hobie 12 in very good condition, shined it up and took it out on two or three short trips. I did good considering my very limited sailing experience which consists of Sunfish rentals on vacations many years ago. Then Issac came along and ended my sailing for the season, but the boat did survive. I put a large trailer roller on my bulkhead and can slide it in or out the water very easily keeping it at all times rigged and ready to go.

        I am interested in getting advice and tips to prevent capsizing. If/when I do capsize, my life will not be in danger, because I am never more than swimming distance from shore. However, if I don't have to worry about taking a dip in cold water I could extend my season to almost year round. I live on a narrow canal and paddle about 100 yds. to a canal that is easily wide enough for me to sail around. The sail was modified and has rings that allow me to paddle out with the sail down, then raise it on the water and lower it to paddle back. If the wind is right I can sail out and sometimes all the way back. I don't have to worry about traffic and I don't intend to take it out when the wind is higher than I will feel safe in. I took the Hiking strap out because I never intend to use it and replaced it with a flat vinyl and foam pad to kneel on. I learned quickly that it is almost impossible to paddle with a free swinging rudder. I rigged up a bungie cord
        system that keeps it centered on its own, but has enough play to allow me to steer.

        Any ideas or advice for someone interested in Slow, Easy, Capsize free sailing would certainly be appreciated. Myrtle Grove Bob




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • alivia dockery
        Dear Bob---buy a Mast Buoy.   this will keep your mast from sinking or turtling down while capsized. see this website and in search box type in:  Mast
        Message 3 of 5 , May 21, 2013
          Dear Bob---buy a "Mast Buoy."  this will keep your mast from sinking or "turtling" down while capsized.
          see this website and in search box type in:  Mast Buoy.  http://www.sailsportmarine.com/
          they are located in Traverse City, Mich. and have 3 different sizes and mounts.  This has saved me a few times on capsizing while learning.
          I have a mono hull Hobie 12.
           
           
          see top of mast? Made by Hobie Cat.
           
           
            Hobie Mast Float--you can google it too. Then there is a video on how to attach it on : http://www.youtube.com/
          http://youtu.be/ccRjMWEOy4g%c2%a0 click here...
           
          Good sailing!
          Alivia
          alivia321@...
          Denver

          ________________________________
          From: Scot Spencer <gliccman@...>
          To: "Holder12@yahoogroups.com" <Holder12@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2013 9:23 AM
          Subject: Re: [Holder12] Slow easy sailing


           

          I cannot give you specifics on avoiding capsize in a Hobie/Holder 12 but I do highly recommend taking the sailboat out with someone else in a power boat nearby (or at least on shore watching with access to a power boat) and capsize it on purpose in order to understand how to recover (right the boat & climb back in) if there is ever a point in time when you do capsize...better to learn in a controlled environement.

          Also, since you say you are keeping the boat rigged, be sure to cover the sail so the sun does not damage it.

          Scot
          Great Lakes Bay Region

          ________________________________
          From: bobboozm <mailto:BOBBOOZM%40aol.com>
          To: mailto:Holder12%40yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, May 20, 2013 3:55 PM
          Subject: [Holder12] Slow easy sailing


           
          I am 70 years old and been around the water and power boats all my life. I live on the water in Southeast Louisiana and have my own boat dock that houses my two power boats. Near the end of last Summer I found a Hobie 12 in very good condition, shined it up and took it out on two or three short trips. I did good considering my very limited sailing experience which consists of Sunfish rentals on vacations many years ago. Then Issac came along and ended my sailing for the season, but the boat did survive. I put a large trailer roller on my bulkhead and can slide it in or out the water very easily keeping it at all times rigged and ready to go.

          I am interested in getting advice and tips to prevent capsizing. If/when I do capsize, my life will not be in danger, because I am never more than swimming distance from shore. However, if I don't have to worry about taking a dip in cold water I could extend my season to almost year round. I live on a narrow canal and paddle about 100 yds. to a canal that is easily wide enough for me to sail around. The sail was modified and has rings that allow me to paddle out with the sail down, then raise it on the water and lower it to paddle back. If the wind is right I can sail out and sometimes all the way back. I don't have to worry about traffic and I don't intend to take it out when the wind is higher than I will feel safe in. I took the Hiking strap out because I never intend to use it and replaced it with a flat vinyl and foam pad to kneel on. I learned quickly that it is almost impossible to paddle with a free swinging rudder. I rigged up a bungie cord
          system that keeps it centered on its own, but has enough play to allow me to steer.

          Any ideas or advice for someone interested in Slow, Easy, Capsize free sailing would certainly be appreciated. Myrtle Grove Bob

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • bobboozm
          Will check it out. Thanks Sent from my iPhone ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 5 , May 22, 2013
            Will check it out. Thanks

            Sent from my iPhone

            On May 21, 2013, at 7:48 PM, alivia dockery <alivia321@...> wrote:

            > Dear Bob---buy a "Mast Buoy." this will keep your mast from sinking or "turtling" down while capsized.
            > see this website and in search box type in: Mast Buoy. http://www.sailsportmarine.com/
            > they are located in Traverse City, Mich. and have 3 different sizes and mounts. This has saved me a few times on capsizing while learning.
            > I have a mono hull Hobie 12.
            >
            >
            > see top of mast? Made by Hobie Cat.
            >
            >
            > Hobie Mast Float--you can google it too. Then there is a video on how to attach it on : http://www.youtube.com/
            > http://youtu.be/ccRjMWEOy4g click here...
            >
            > Good sailing!
            > Alivia
            > alivia321@...
            > Denver
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Scot Spencer <gliccman@...>
            > To: "Holder12@yahoogroups.com" <Holder12@yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2013 9:23 AM
            > Subject: Re: [Holder12] Slow easy sailing
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > I cannot give you specifics on avoiding capsize in a Hobie/Holder 12 but I do highly recommend taking the sailboat out with someone else in a power boat nearby (or at least on shore watching with access to a power boat) and capsize it on purpose in order to understand how to recover (right the boat & climb back in) if there is ever a point in time when you do capsize...better to learn in a controlled environement.
            >
            > Also, since you say you are keeping the boat rigged, be sure to cover the sail so the sun does not damage it.
            >
            > Scot
            > Great Lakes Bay Region
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: bobboozm <mailto:BOBBOOZM%40aol.com>
            > To: mailto:Holder12%40yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Monday, May 20, 2013 3:55 PM
            > Subject: [Holder12] Slow easy sailing
            >
            >
            > I am 70 years old and been around the water and power boats all my life. I live on the water in Southeast Louisiana and have my own boat dock that houses my two power boats. Near the end of last Summer I found a Hobie 12 in very good condition, shined it up and took it out on two or three short trips. I did good considering my very limited sailing experience which consists of Sunfish rentals on vacations many years ago. Then Issac came along and ended my sailing for the season, but the boat did survive. I put a large trailer roller on my bulkhead and can slide it in or out the water very easily keeping it at all times rigged and ready to go.
            >
            > I am interested in getting advice and tips to prevent capsizing. If/when I do capsize, my life will not be in danger, because I am never more than swimming distance from shore. However, if I don't have to worry about taking a dip in cold water I could extend my season to almost year round. I live on a narrow canal and paddle about 100 yds. to a canal that is easily wide enough for me to sail around. The sail was modified and has rings that allow me to paddle out with the sail down, then raise it on the water and lower it to paddle back. If the wind is right I can sail out and sometimes all the way back. I don't have to worry about traffic and I don't intend to take it out when the wind is higher than I will feel safe in. I took the Hiking strap out because I never intend to use it and replaced it with a flat vinyl and foam pad to kneel on. I learned quickly that it is almost impossible to paddle with a free swinging rudder. I rigged up a bungie cord
            > system that keeps it centered on its own, but has enough play to allow me to steer.
            >
            > Any ideas or advice for someone interested in Slow, Easy, Capsize free sailing would certainly be appreciated. Myrtle Grove Bob
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • bobboozm
            Will do, and thanks Sent from my iPhone ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 5 , May 22, 2013
              Will do, and thanks

              Sent from my iPhone

              On May 21, 2013, at 10:23 AM, Scot Spencer <gliccman@...> wrote:

              > I cannot give you specifics on avoiding capsize in a Hobie/Holder 12 but I do highly recommend taking the sailboat out with someone else in a power boat nearby (or at least on shore watching with access to a power boat) and capsize it on purpose in order to understand how to recover (right the boat & climb back in) if there is ever a point in time when you do capsize...better to learn in a controlled environement.
              >
              > Also, since you say you are keeping the boat rigged, be sure to cover the sail so the sun does not damage it.
              >
              > Scot
              > Great Lakes Bay Region
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: bobboozm <BOBBOOZM@...>
              > To: Holder12@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Monday, May 20, 2013 3:55 PM
              > Subject: [Holder12] Slow easy sailing
              >
              >
              >
              > I am 70 years old and been around the water and power boats all my life. I live on the water in Southeast Louisiana and have my own boat dock that houses my two power boats. Near the end of last Summer I found a Hobie 12 in very good condition, shined it up and took it out on two or three short trips. I did good considering my very limited sailing experience which consists of Sunfish rentals on vacations many years ago. Then Issac came along and ended my sailing for the season, but the boat did survive. I put a large trailer roller on my bulkhead and can slide it in or out the water very easily keeping it at all times rigged and ready to go.
              >
              > I am interested in getting advice and tips to prevent capsizing. If/when I do capsize, my life will not be in danger, because I am never more than swimming distance from shore. However, if I don't have to worry about taking a dip in cold water I could extend my season to almost year round. I live on a narrow canal and paddle about 100 yds. to a canal that is easily wide enough for me to sail around. The sail was modified and has rings that allow me to paddle out with the sail down, then raise it on the water and lower it to paddle back. If the wind is right I can sail out and sometimes all the way back. I don't have to worry about traffic and I don't intend to take it out when the wind is higher than I will feel safe in. I took the Hiking strap out because I never intend to use it and replaced it with a flat vinyl and foam pad to kneel on. I learned quickly that it is almost impossible to paddle with a free swinging rudder. I rigged up a bungie cord
              > system that keeps it centered on its own, but has enough play to allow me to steer.
              >
              > Any ideas or advice for someone interested in Slow, Easy, Capsize free sailing would certainly be appreciated. Myrtle Grove Bob
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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