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Re: Womens history - another thought

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  • Melham2@aol.com
    Hi again Just another thought - many men today are afraid of strong women - I am sure that was equally true in the past, and lots of our historical sources
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2007
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      Hi again

      Just another thought - many men today are afraid of strong women - I am sure that was equally true in the past, and lots of our historical sources come from men.........

      Linda H
      www.melindahammond.com

      ________________________________________________________________________
      Get a FREE AOL Email account with 2GB of storage. Plus, share and store photos and experience exclusively recorded live music Sessions from your favourite artists. Find out more at http://info.aol.co.uk/joinnow/?ncid=548.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Susanne Dunlap
      Ah, you ve been reading Jane Austen! (Famous scene in Persuasion.). But I don t just mean historical sources. I try to get my information from contemporary
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 1, 2007
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        Ah, you've been reading Jane Austen! (Famous scene in Persuasion.).



        But I don't just mean historical sources. I try to get my information from
        contemporary sources whenever I can, even fiction of the day especially when
        written by women. A wonderful indication of the trammeling of women's roles
        is in a publication called The Female Spectator, which Eliza Haywood wrote
        in the mid-eighteenth century as the women's answer to The Spectator, which
        dealt with politics and other things from a man's point of view. Her
        publication was very tame, contained a lot about virtue and other such
        things, but she herself had a very adventuresome background. She was
        abandoned by her husband (probably/maybe-sources are not in complete
        agreement) and left to support two small children. First she started acting,
        which basically promised her the taint of a loose woman for the rest of her
        life whether she was one or not. Then she turned to writing-plays, novels
        etc. The Female Spectator was a bid to regain her respectability later in
        her life, and was enormously popular with women. Yet in my research I found
        some incredibly vituperant and nasty salvos aimed at her, presumably simply
        for stepping out of line to meddle in the man's world of publishing a
        periodical. Here's an example of an anonymous poem:



        The Female Apologist.



        How early did Love's Flame inspire

        A Passion in thy Virgin Breast;

        Scarce in thy Teens, when all on Fire,

        To taste its Joys, and to be blest!



        Thy Bib and Doll scarce thrown aside,

        When warm and panting for a Spouse;

        To Fifty thou hast been a Bride,

        Without a Ring to bind thy Vows.



        But ah! How soon does Beauty fade,

        That Lustre, smiling Youth bestow'd;

        How soon, quite cover'd with a Shade

        Those Cheeks, where once their Roses glow'd.



        The Crowd of Beaux behold no more

        In Raptures now thy Beams decay'd;

        Those Looks, quite frightful in the Wh-re,

        Which once transported in the Maid.



        Once Venus, arm'd in all her Power,

        A Fury now thou dost appear,

        A loathsome Weed, a fragrant Flower

        Quite ripe and rotten in a Year.



        Ah! Pity now the frail One's Lot,

        On her sick Couch, while Phillis lies!

        Other Folks die before thay rot,

        But Phillis rots before she dies.



        Tho' pale thy Look, tho' dead thy Eye,

        Thy spritely Wit shall never fail:

        Whose Pen shall now that Wealth supply,

        Which once was purchas'd with your Tail.



        'Tis but a little changing Arts,

        And the same Point you nicely it,

        Equally skill'd to touch our Hearts,

        Just as you please, a Wh-re, or Wit.



        But ah! How poor the Gains, and light,

        Which from the stingy Press you meet;

        'Twas once a Guinea for a Night,

        'Tis now scarce Six-pence for a Sheet.



        Your good old Trade if you give o'er,

        Ah! Think e'er you the Change begin,

        Your Bed and Blankets brought in more,

        Than e'er your Sheets will bring you in.



        Thy Pen, less fatal than thy Charms,

        A brave Revenge can ne'er inspire;

        Take then, thy Tyrant in thy Arms,

        And send the Victim home on Fire;



        Then sooth thy Rage, and blunt thy Quill,

        A greater Curse thy smiles would prove;

        These, these, the surest Way to kill;

        Thy Hate less cruel than thy Love.



        I give you this tidbit as a thank-you for the forbearance of this list to
        permit my rants and raves. It's from a pamphlet in the British Library. I've
        never found another copy of it anywhere.



        Susanne Dunlap

        Author of Emilie's Voice and Liszt's Kiss

        Touchstone Books

        www.dunlaphistoricalfiction.com

        _____

        From: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Melham2@...
        Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 7:42 AM
        To: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Historical Novel Society Re: Womens history - another thought



        Hi again

        Just another thought - many men today are afraid of strong women - I am sure
        that was equally true in the past, and lots of our historical sources come
        from men.........

        Linda H
        www.melindahammond.com

        __________________________________________________________
        Get a FREE AOL Email account with 2GB of storage. Plus, share and store
        photos and experience exclusively recorded live music Sessions from your
        favourite artists. Find out more at http://info.
        <http://info.aol.co.uk/joinnow/?ncid=548.> aol.co.uk/joinnow/?ncid=548.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Susanne Dunlap
        Oh, here s the reference: Pamphlet from The British Library, R.C., 1748 #76, The Female Apologist. A Satire. Occasion d by the Monthly Memoirs of a Celebrated
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 1, 2007
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          Oh, here's the reference:



          Pamphlet from The British Library, R.C., 1748 #76, The Female Apologist. A
          Satire. Occasion'd by the Monthly Memoirs of a Celebrated British Lady. By
          R. C. of the Middle Temple, Esq. London, Printed: and Sold at the Pamphlet
          Shops at the Royal exchange, Temple-Bar, and Charing-Cross. MDCCXLVIII





          Susanne Dunlap

          Author of Emilie's Voice and Liszt's Kiss

          Touchstone Books

          www.dunlaphistoricalfiction.com

          _____

          From: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Melham2@...
          Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 7:42 AM
          To: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Historical Novel Society Re: Womens history - another thought



          Hi again

          Just another thought - many men today are afraid of strong women - I am sure
          that was equally true in the past, and lots of our historical sources come
          from men.........

          Linda H
          www.melindahammond.com

          __________________________________________________________
          Get a FREE AOL Email account with 2GB of storage. Plus, share and store
          photos and experience exclusively recorded live music Sessions from your
          favourite artists. Find out more at http://info.
          <http://info.aol.co.uk/joinnow/?ncid=548.> aol.co.uk/joinnow/?ncid=548.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Sidney Allinson
          ... From: Melham2@aol.com To: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 4:42 AM Subject: Historical Novel Society Re: Womens history -
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 1, 2007
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            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Melham2@...
            To: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 4:42 AM
            Subject: Historical Novel Society Re: Womens history - another thought


            >Just another thought - many men today are afraid of >strong women - I am sure that was equally true in the >past, ........
            >Linda H

            What an extraordinary sweeping statement.

            -- Sidney.



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