Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Historical Novel Society Romance formulas

Expand Messages
  • Lisa
    ... That s why I decided to call those things genre conventions and avoid the negative connotations associated with the term formula. It seems different
    Message 1 of 77 , Mar 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Alison:

      >I don't believe in a formula but I do believe in a "reader
      > expectation". A reader wants a HEA ending just as much as readers
      >of crimes want the crime solved and the murderr caught.

      That's why I decided to call those things "genre conventions" and
      avoid the negative connotations associated with the term formula. It
      seems different people mean different things by formula.

      >"Romance" is such a huge sweep of a word. It creeps into every
      > mainstream novel in a larger or smaller degree - Bernard Cornwall,
      >Dan Brown, Tom Clancy...it's lurking there, but say you are
      >a "romance writer" and you get THAT look.

      I think that there's a difference between a Romance and a historical
      with a love story in it. I think that it boils down to target
      audience, and what that audience expects. I also think that love
      stories are central to human experience, resonate universally, and
      can be found in many places other than romance novels.

      From what I understand, Romance novels focus primarily on the
      relationship between the H & H, and the relationship is always
      resolved before the end of he book leading to the HEA. To complicate
      things further, as Lynne pointed out, there are all kinds of sub-
      genres in romance that include mystery and suspense, fantasy,
      paranormal, comedy etc. I believe that for these books to be
      considered romance, they must conform to the conventions of the genre.


      In other genres, the development of the romance itself may or may not
      be the plot and the HEA isn't expected. If it's a fantasy novel, it
      may or may not also have a romance in it. If it does, it is probably
      secondary to the quest.

      I could be way off base here, but that's how I understand it. In my
      case. I'm having a heck of a time with mine for this reason. I keep
      going back and forth- it's a romance, no maybe it's a historical
      novel with a romance in it, and so forth. I have two endings in mind
      and one is as close to HEA that I can get. The focus of the book is
      probably more on the history than the love interest, with the love
      story coming in as a sub-plot.

      I'm no expert, just a reader who is trying to write, and who has
      opinions:-) So take or leave what I say...

      Lisa
    • Judy Ridgley
      Lisa, I agree with you. You seem to have it nailed down. I don t have a historical writers group here but I do have a romance group that I attend for the
      Message 77 of 77 , Mar 2, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Lisa, I agree with you. You seem to have it nailed down. I don't have a historical writers group here but I do have a romance group that I attend for the common interest of writing. I'm the oddball. But I have had to work through this division of genre for myself. After joining, I soon found myself writing romance according to the dictates...H&H must meet in the first X pages of the story, etc. Also the focus began to entrap me. I'm not a real romantic in truth. I love loving but you can love more than each other or that each other is all consuming point of view.
        It's good to be with others who love history and the romance in That.

        Judy

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.