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Re: Historical Novel Society Marg. George

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  • UkHrh@aol.com
    Has anyone read anything by Margaret George? I ve previously read her novel about Henry VIII, and I m just now reading her book about Mary, Queen of Scots.
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 2, 2005
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      Has anyone read anything by Margaret George? I've previously read her novel
      about Henry VIII, and I'm just now reading her book about Mary, Queen of
      Scots. I've been finding them well written and well researched.

      Susan Higginbotham>>

      Those were my favorite two. Since then I think she's been on a steady
      downside. Mary Called Magdalene, I actually wall-banged. (To borrow one of Susan
      H.'s fav. sayings <g>)




      Wendy
      -My heroes are the ones who survived doing it wrong, who made mistakes, but
      recovered from them--Bono


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • UkHrh@aol.com
      I ve read Mary, Called Magdalene , not a popular title of hers, I ve discovered from other list members, but I enjoyed it more than her other novels. IMHO,
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 2, 2005
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        I've read "Mary, Called Magdalene", not a popular title of hers, I've
        discovered from other list members, but I enjoyed it more than her other novels.
        IMHO, I thought it very well researched, the characters very real and
        believeable. and it was a perfect foil at the time to all the hype and verbiage
        going on about the DaVinci Code and it's speculative nature about certain
        religious folk and their relationships.

        Cheers!

        Ellen Ekstrom>>

        Just to bring a point across...historical fiction or fiction otherwise can
        almost always be considered of a speculative nature. I don't see why Da Vinci
        because of it's obvious *anti-Rome* views should be thought of as a lesser
        work than Mary, Called Magdalene? (Which I thought was wordy and dull as
        sin...no pun intended.) She certainly didn't make *her* character come alive IMO.
        Just because a novel is inspirational or borders on the inspirational it
        should still be considered for exactly what it is...fiction, historical,
        religious or otherwise.








        Wendy
        (probably opening a can of worms?)
        penmanreview@...
        ElizabethChadwick@yahoogroups.com
        The_RealRichardIII@yahoogroups.com


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • boswellbaxter@bellsouth.net
        My husband tried the Mary Magdalene one a while back. He put it down after a while, though--he said he just wasn t comfortable with the premise. I might try it
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 2, 2005
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          My husband tried the Mary Magdalene one a while back. He put it down after a while, though--he said he just wasn't comfortable with the premise. I might try it this summer.

          Susan Higginbotham
          www.susanhigginbotham.com
          ============================================================
          From: UkHrh@...
          Date: 2005/06/02 Thu AM 08:49:36 EDT
          To: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: Historical Novel Society Marg. George

          ============================================================
        • boswellbaxter@bellsouth.net
          Wendy wrote: Just to bring a point across...historical fiction or fiction otherwise can almost always be considered of a speculative nature. I don t see why
          Message 4 of 12 , Jun 2, 2005
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            Wendy wrote:

            Just to bring a point across...historical fiction or fiction otherwise can
            almost always be considered of a speculative nature. I don't see why Da Vinci
            because of it's obvious *anti-Rome* views should be thought of as a lesser
            work than Mary, Called Magdalene? (Which I thought was wordy and dull as
            sin...no pun intended.) She certainly didn't make *her* character come alive IMO.
            Just because a novel is inspirational or borders on the inspirational it
            should still be considered for exactly what it is...fiction, historical,
            religious or otherwise.
            Wendy
            (probably opening a can of worms?)
            ============================================================
            Well, quiet as it is, it probably wouldn't hurt to have some worms wiggling around, as long as they don't screw up my computer :)

            I've never read the Da Vinci Code, and probably won't, as neither the subject matter nor the author interests me. Judging from the responses engendered when it's mentioned on other lists I belong to, though, people either love it or hate it.

            Susan Higginbotham
            www.susanhigginbotham.com
          • Ellen Ekstrom
            Excellent point, Wendy! What I was trying to say, and it s hard so early in the morning, is that Dan Brown s book is a mystery, suspense thriller, NOT a work
            Message 5 of 12 , Jun 2, 2005
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              Excellent point, Wendy!

              What I was trying to say, and it's hard so early in the morning, is that Dan Brown's book is a mystery, suspense thriller, NOT a work of historical fact as many have taken his premise to be. Nothing he writes has been substantiated by extant documents, research or even devine revelation. Yet, people got all worked up over his premise that Mary and Jesus were married - and it's a very old premise - and took it for, excuse me here, Gospel (which, by the way, doesn't mean 'truth' but 'good tidings' in Greek) and two years later, we who work in the Church are still getting asked if it's true, or hear, "Well, It's got to be true, Dan Brown wrote about it." Truth is, Dan Brown did a lot of his research in "Holy Blood, Holy Grail", which is in itself, a whole, BIG, can of worms. But an entertaining premise and read.

              I enjoyed the DaVinci Code for what it is - a great, fun, weekend, read.

              I wouldn't call Mary Called Magdalene inspirational - I think Margaret George makes her a little bit on the fringe.

              But hey, it's bringing people into churches and getting their curiosity up about theology, which I think is cool.

              Cheers!

              Ellen (who has to work on a sermon now, although the last paragraph sounded like one!)

              boswellbaxter@... wrote:
              Wendy wrote:

              Just to bring a point across...historical fiction or fiction otherwise can
              almost always be considered of a speculative nature. I don't see why Da Vinci
              because of it's obvious *anti-Rome* views should be thought of as a lesser
              work than Mary, Called Magdalene? (Which I thought was wordy and dull as
              sin...no pun intended.) She certainly didn't make *her* character come alive IMO.
              Just because a novel is inspirational or borders on the inspirational it
              should still be considered for exactly what it is...fiction, historical,
              religious or otherwise.
              Wendy
              (probably opening a can of worms?)
              ============================================================
              Well, quiet as it is, it probably wouldn't hurt to have some worms wiggling around, as long as they don't screw up my computer :)

              I've never read the Da Vinci Code, and probably won't, as neither the subject matter nor the author interests me. Judging from the responses engendered when it's mentioned on other lists I belong to, though, people either love it or hate it.

              Susan Higginbotham
              www.susanhigginbotham.com



              If you're not already a member, why not JOIN the HNS? Email Richard for details (richard@...) or join by credit card online via our website at www.historicalnovelsociety.org

              Also, you might want to receive the HNS Newsletter (an edited magazine-style publication featuring news and reviews from the UK and US; it comes every two weeks, and it's free). Send a blank email to HNSNewsletter-subscribe@yahoogroups.com



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            • Ellen Ekstrom
              Yep. Mary Magdalene is one of those wonderful New Testament ladies that peopel get uncomfortable with thanks to St. Gregory s trashing her as a prostitute .
              Message 6 of 12 , Jun 2, 2005
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                Yep. Mary Magdalene is one of those wonderful New Testament ladies that peopel get uncomfortable with thanks to St. Gregory's trashing her as a 'prostitute'. She wasn't. He took three distinct women and made them one - kind of unholy trinity there.

                An excellent book based on Biblical women is Diamant's "The Red Tent". The story was based on chapter from the Book of Genesis (Gen. 35) and it is wonderful. She really did her homework there.

                Ellen



                boswellbaxter@... wrote:
                My husband tried the Mary Magdalene one a while back. He put it down after a while, though--he said he just wasn't comfortable with the premise. I might try it this summer.

                Susan Higginbotham
                www.susanhigginbotham.com
                ============================================================
                From: UkHrh@...
                Date: 2005/06/02 Thu AM 08:49:36 EDT
                To: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: Historical Novel Society Marg. George

                ============================================================




                If you're not already a member, why not JOIN the HNS? Email Richard for details (richard@...) or join by credit card online via our website at www.historicalnovelsociety.org

                Also, you might want to receive the HNS Newsletter (an edited magazine-style publication featuring news and reviews from the UK and US; it comes every two weeks, and it's free). Send a blank email to HNSNewsletter-subscribe@yahoogroups.com



                ---------------------------------
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              • operasus@aol.com
                I m interested to read this discussion about Dan Brown s book and the other controversial biblical-figures books. There was just a flurry of chat about The
                Message 7 of 12 , Jun 2, 2005
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                  I'm interested to read this discussion about Dan Brown's book and the other
                  controversial biblical-figures books. There was just a flurry of chat about
                  "The DaVinci Code" over in Readerville. Not a little annoyance that a work so
                  flimsily bound in fact and shoddily written could make it so big.

                  I am about to read The Red Tent, and from the first page I know I will like
                  it.

                  Still, the whole discussion begs the question as to how much "history"
                  people get from the fiction they read, whether it's -- strictly speaking --
                  classified as historical fiction or not. I think that's possibly the best argument
                  for doing one's research as a historical novelist extremely carefully. It's a
                  question I'm asked all the time when I do readings and talks: how much of it
                  is fact?

                  Susanne Dunlap
                  Author of Emilie's Voice
                  A Touchstone Book of Simon & Schuster
                  April, 2005
                  operasus@...


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Susan Hicks
                  I was asked by Margaret George s publishers to give a quote for this one. I started reading - well and good, but then my eyes began to glaze over and I
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jun 2, 2005
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                    I was asked by Margaret George's publishers to give a quote for this one. I started reading - well and good, but then my eyes began to glaze over and I realised that I just wasn't getting involved. Who gives a stuff? was my feeling. I think I got just past a third of the way in before deciding that enough was enough. I have heard that her work on Henry VIII is more engrossing.

                    They're going to be filming some of the Da Vinci Code (starring Tom Hanks) at Lincoln Cathedral. It was on our local news today. That's interesting. I love some of the UK's great Medieval cathedrals but Lincoln has always given me the willies. You can feel the money and power that went into building it, and somehow it's oppressive and grounded, rather than soaring. I have a friend from the USA on another e-list who visited it and felt the same way. I do hope they don't film in the Temple Church. I feel very protective towards that one :-)

                    Best
                    Susan
                    'For nobody seeking to make a living from writing should put in his book anything which is not strictly necessary.'
                    Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal, early 13th Century


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Ellen Ekstrom
                    Susanne: Was it Samuel Pepys who said, All the history I ever learned, I learned from Shakespeare? People ask me about whether Francesco da Romena, the
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jun 2, 2005
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                      Susanne:

                      Was it Samuel Pepys who said, "All the history I ever learned, I learned from Shakespeare?"

                      People ask me about whether Francesco da Romena, the protagonist of my book, "The Legacy" was real. Yes and no. As a historical theologian, and in my humble opinion, if history was made exciting to children, and if history text books and texts were a bit to the left of dull, perhaps more people would be more interested in history and not read historical fiction for their history - but then, that would put a bunch of us out of business, wouldn't it?

                      I had very dull, boring history teachers in high school and college - I'm amazed I still like history. I had a professor in seminary who made history come alive. And, when I want to read about the historical Jesus, I read Bishop Tom Wright's works.

                      Regards,

                      Ellen

                      operasus@... wrote:
                      I'm interested to read this discussion about Dan Brown's book and the other
                      controversial biblical-figures books. There was just a flurry of chat about
                      "The DaVinci Code" over in Readerville. Not a little annoyance that a work so
                      flimsily bound in fact and shoddily written could make it so big.

                      I am about to read The Red Tent, and from the first page I know I will like
                      it.

                      Still, the whole discussion begs the question as to how much "history"
                      people get from the fiction they read, whether it's -- strictly speaking --
                      classified as historical fiction or not. I think that's possibly the best argument
                      for doing one's research as a historical novelist extremely carefully. It's a
                      question I'm asked all the time when I do readings and talks: how much of it
                      is fact?

                      Susanne Dunlap
                      Author of Emilie's Voice
                      A Touchstone Book of Simon & Schuster
                      April, 2005
                      operasus@...


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                      If you're not already a member, why not JOIN the HNS? Email Richard for details (richard@...) or join by credit card online via our website at www.historicalnovelsociety.org

                      Also, you might want to receive the HNS Newsletter (an edited magazine-style publication featuring news and reviews from the UK and US; it comes every two weeks, and it's free). Send a blank email to HNSNewsletter-subscribe@yahoogroups.com



                      ---------------------------------
                      Yahoo! Groups Links

                      To visit your group on the web, go to:
                      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/HistoricalNovelSociety/

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                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Ellen Ekstrom
                      Susan: I ve heard that about Lincoln, too, from my English friends, clergy and non. Wonder what it is? Ellen Susan Hicks wrote:
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jun 2, 2005
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                        Susan:

                        I've heard that about Lincoln, too, from my English friends, clergy and non. Wonder what it is?

                        Ellen

                        Susan Hicks <Susan.Hicks1@...> wrote:
                        I was asked by Margaret George's publishers to give a quote for this one. I started reading - well and good, but then my eyes began to glaze over and I realised that I just wasn't getting involved. Who gives a stuff? was my feeling. I think I got just past a third of the way in before deciding that enough was enough. I have heard that her work on Henry VIII is more engrossing.

                        They're going to be filming some of the Da Vinci Code (starring Tom Hanks) at Lincoln Cathedral. It was on our local news today. That's interesting. I love some of the UK's great Medieval cathedrals but Lincoln has always given me the willies. You can feel the money and power that went into building it, and somehow it's oppressive and grounded, rather than soaring. I have a friend from the USA on another e-list who visited it and felt the same way. I do hope they don't film in the Temple Church. I feel very protective towards that one :-)

                        Best
                        Susan
                        'For nobody seeking to make a living from writing should put in his book anything which is not strictly necessary.'
                        Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal, early 13th Century


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                        If you're not already a member, why not JOIN the HNS? Email Richard for details (richard@...) or join by credit card online via our website at www.historicalnovelsociety.org

                        Also, you might want to receive the HNS Newsletter (an edited magazine-style publication featuring news and reviews from the UK and US; it comes every two weeks, and it's free). Send a blank email to HNSNewsletter-subscribe@yahoogroups.com



                        ---------------------------------
                        Yahoo! Groups Links

                        To visit your group on the web, go to:
                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/HistoricalNovelSociety/

                        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                        HistoricalNovelSociety-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • operasus@aol.com
                        In a message dated 6/2/2005 11:35:32 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, ellen@ellenekstrom.net writes: Was it Samuel Pepys who said, All the history I ever learned,
                        Message 11 of 12 , Jun 2, 2005
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                          In a message dated 6/2/2005 11:35:32 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                          ellen@... writes:

                          Was it Samuel Pepys who said, "All the history I ever learned, I learned
                          from Shakespeare?"


                          Ellen: All I can say is "Amen to that!" (re: getting history however one
                          can).


                          Susanne Dunlap
                          Author of Emilie's Voice
                          A Touchstone Book of Simon & Schuster
                          April, 2005
                          operasus@...


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Sidney Allinson
                          ... Me too. I learned far more about the American Revolution by reading Kenneth Roberts trilogy of accurately researched historical novels than from all other
                          Message 12 of 12 , Jun 3, 2005
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                            >>Was it Samuel Pepys who said, "All the history
                            >>I ever learned, I learned from Shakespeare?"


                            >>>Ellen: All I can say is "Amen to that!"
                            >>>(re: getting history however one can).
                            >>>Susanne Dunlap

                            Me too. I learned far more about the American Revolution
                            by reading Kenneth Roberts' trilogy of accurately researched
                            historical novels than from all other previous sources --
                            including school, of course.
                            - Sidney.



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