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Nomenclature. And my intro as a new member!

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  • Jo-Ann Power
    With your question about how people in the 1920s termed World War One, I will introduce myself as a new member here...and then say that those who fought in
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 27, 2013
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      With your question about how people in the 1920s termed World War One, I will introduce myself as a new member here...and then say that those who fought in this war termed it, the Great War.

      In France, la Grande Guerre.

      It was also called by American troops the "war to end war" a la how it was addressed by the British, until President Wilson called it "the war to end all wars" in his speech about the Peace Treaty.

      Having just returned a few months ago from a 3-week research trip to the American front lines in France, I can tell you many in France still call it la Grande Guerre. The French have opened recently a new museum in Meaux by the same name. And the exhibits are fabulously informative. If any of you go to Paris, do take the train from Gare de l'est to suburban Meaux for a heart-rending exhibition.

      So then that leads me to wave hello and say I am delighted to be here.

      October 1, my new historical fiction HEROIC MEASURES will go up worldwide for pre-order. To be released on Armistice Day, November 11 in print and in digital, HEROIC MEASURES tells the story of American nurses who volunteered to serve on the front lines during the Great War.  Having researched this topic for decades, I was told when I first tried to sell it (in a previous incarnation) that "We love the story. But World War One? Too depressing. No one will buy it!"

      Here I am back again at the Centennial to show how many readers truly are interested in the Great War...and in the more than 10,000 women who volunteered for the US Army Nurse Corps to serve in the most primitive conditions and to save lives.
      I am honored to be here among so many talented authors. Thanks for having me. 
      Jo-Ann Power
      HEROIC MEASURES
      In a war-torn world, one woman discovers the measures of her own heroism.
      Coming this Armistice Day, November 11
      For a preview of how these women served: http://theyalsofought.blogspot.com  
      Award-winning author of fiction and non at  www.jo-annpower.com
    • Pat Brown
      Hi Jo-Ann, and welcome. Thanks for the answer, too. Pat Brown http://pabrown.com/ “Write the book the way it should be written, then give it to somebody to
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 27, 2013
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        Hi Jo-Ann, and welcome. Thanks for the answer, too.

        Pat Brown

        http://pabrown.com/
        “Write the book the way it should be written, then give it to somebody to put in the commas and shit.”  Elmore Leonard 1925-2013
         


        On Fri, Sep 27, 2013 at 5:52 PM, Jo-Ann Power <wjpower@...> wrote:
         

        With your question about how people in the 1920s termed World War One, I will introduce myself as a new member here...and then say that those who fought in this war termed it, the Great War.

        In France, la Grande Guerre.

        It was also called by American troops the "war to end war" a la how it was addressed by the British, until President Wilson called it "the war to end all wars" in his speech about the Peace Treaty.

        Having just returned a few months ago from a 3-week research trip to the American front lines in France, I can tell you many in France still call it la Grande Guerre. The French have opened recently a new museum in Meaux by the same name. And the exhibits are fabulously informative. If any of you go to Paris, do take the train from Gare de l'est to suburban Meaux for a heart-rending exhibition.

        So then that leads me to wave hello and say I am delighted to be here.

        October 1, my new historical fiction HEROIC MEASURES will go up worldwide for pre-order. To be released on Armistice Day, November 11 in print and in digital, HEROIC MEASURES tells the story of American nurses who volunteered to serve on the front lines during the Great War.  Having researched this topic for decades, I was told when I first tried to sell it (in a previous incarnation) that "We love the story. But World War One? Too depressing. No one will buy it!"

        Here I am back again at the Centennial to show how many readers truly are interested in the Great War...and in the more than 10,000 women who volunteered for the US Army Nurse Corps to serve in the most primitive conditions and to save lives.
        I am honored to be here among so many talented authors. Thanks for having me. 
        Jo-Ann Power
        HEROIC MEASURES
        In a war-torn world, one woman discovers the measures of her own heroism.
        Coming this Armistice Day, November 11
        For a preview of how these women served: http://theyalsofought.blogspot.com  
        Award-winning author of fiction and non at  www.jo-annpower.com


      • Allen Kinchen
        Because you are female , and write from a totally different perspective of the that War or any War , you may be successful . This is an extremely hard
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 28, 2013
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          Because you are female , and write from a totally different perspective  of the that  War or any War ,  you may be successful .  This is an extremely hard category to be successful . Each year there are over 750,000 stories that go unpublished via mainstream or make money for self publishing companies or E-books  etc . Some are shocked and  do have their 15 minutes of glory recognition, 

          This is an industry and business,  and the key to success is knowing who your audience will be and writing specifically for  that audience .  Many things simply mimic or copy after each other, there is rare any originality ,  even these cheap movies done and produced are copied constantly , yet they make money .  and that is the Key , making a living in writing is difficult , this is far different than just making money on a single  book .  The successful  writers of  today are mostly women and very intelligent , and the reason is they know what sells and what does not sell .  They know that 90% of the readers are other women , whom actually read for Pleasure of reading to be entertained , and even then each has her stories she likes to read .  Many many female authors are unbelievably talented and we can not  help but have deep respect for their cunning and brilliance in a cut throat industry .  

           Their  brilliance goes much further than just the talent of writing , they actually get inside the minds of other women readers , Most  men fail miserably at understanding intelligent female readers.  You may be an exception in your category . so much has replaced pleasure reading mainly social medias whom normally push BS , and opinions .  It is extremely hard to go against the flow and be successful ,  but if anyone has a chance it will be the  female writers . 


          On Fri, Sep 27, 2013 at 4:52 PM, Jo-Ann Power <wjpower@...> wrote:
           

          With your question about how people in the 1920s termed World War One, I will introduce myself as a new member here...and then say that those who fought in this war termed it, the Great War.

          In France, la Grande Guerre.

          It was also called by American troops the "war to end war" a la how it was addressed by the British, until President Wilson called it "the war to end all wars" in his speech about the Peace Treaty.

          Having just returned a few months ago from a 3-week research trip to the American front lines in France, I can tell you many in France still call it la Grande Guerre. The French have opened recently a new museum in Meaux by the same name. And the exhibits are fabulously informative. If any of you go to Paris, do take the train from Gare de l'est to suburban Meaux for a heart-rending exhibition.

          So then that leads me to wave hello and say I am delighted to be here.

          October 1, my new historical fiction HEROIC MEASURES will go up worldwide for pre-order. To be released on Armistice Day, November 11 in print and in digital, HEROIC MEASURES tells the story of American nurses who volunteered to serve on the front lines during the Great War.  Having researched this topic for decades, I was told when I first tried to sell it (in a previous incarnation) that "We love the story. But World War One? Too depressing. No one will buy it!"

          Here I am back again at the Centennial to show how many readers truly are interested in the Great War...and in the more than 10,000 women who volunteered for the US Army Nurse Corps to serve in the most primitive conditions and to save lives.
          I am honored to be here among so many talented authors. Thanks for having me. 
          Jo-Ann Power
          HEROIC MEASURES
          In a war-torn world, one woman discovers the measures of her own heroism.
          Coming this Armistice Day, November 11
          For a preview of how these women served: http://theyalsofought.blogspot.com  
          Award-winning author of fiction and non at  www.jo-annpower.com


        • Jo-Ann Power
          I totally agree with your assessment that because this is a war story told from the perspective of women who are nonetheless back of the line the novel has
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 29, 2013
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            I totally agree with your assessment that because this is a "war" story told from the perspective of women who are nonetheless "back of the line" the novel has a readership in women of all ages. A few men will give it a go as well because they want to see the activity back of the front and frankly, few war books or movies do show that.

            As a result the discussion of heroism will, I hope, be widened to include definitions we rarely ascribe to it. One of the biggest challenges to these nurses, especially the ones in the mobile surgical units up one mile in back of advancing line is to see and address horrific wounds of shells, bullets, bombs, and gas which have no equal in civilian hospital context, especially for frequency.

            I hope this book too serves to broaden the understanding here in the US of the challenges of those who served in the Great War and what that war truly means to all of us now.
             
            Jo-Ann Power
            HEROIC MEASURES
            In a war-torn world, one woman discovers the measures of her own heroism.
            Coming this Armistice Day, November 11
            For a preview of how these women served: http://theyalsofought.blogspot.com  
            Award-winning author of fiction and non at  www.jo-annpower.com
          • Allen Kinchen
            I know nothing about you , but I do feel you will much more successful than nearly all men . You probably will bring an element of love or passion in your
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 29, 2013
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              I know nothing about you ,  but I do feel you will much more successful than nearly all men . You probably will bring an element of love or passion in your story , few men have that ability.  Women can do many things men can not do , or at least most men can not do .  I have had  female co writers and they are  brilliant .  So  much  so that I put the novel or work in their name , unless it is a Bio or Non Fiction .  Women will read another woman's work before reading a man's work .  You see you have half the battle won already .  My wife buys lots of books , novels , or Bios .  She only buys other women's work   

               Women have always played major rolls in any War effort on both sides .  I wrote for my home Town Newspaper part time for years as well as worked a full time job .  I interviewed and did Bios on many women whom served in WW2 . Women Pilots , Nurses , countless skilled workers in all facets of manufacturing War materials .  In 1942 more women died on the job building machinery than any other year , they came from the Kitchen to an assembly line environment and safety was never a priority back in those days .  Many women were killed by accident . 

               Also in Germany women were the primary resistance net work against the Nazis until the War itself consumed everyone in an act of survival .  Few people know about the Edelweiss boys and girls , or  '' The Noble Cause Resistance Network " .  In Cologne Germany there were over 7,000 Edelweiss , mostly orphans who's fathers were socialist Democrats and put into Prison never to be seen again , this left a giant void in the home with no father , and often they starved to death or died in the relentless bombing . Cologne was reduced to ashes and debris , only the Cathedral survived , bombed 262 times there was nothing left .  It was too close to  British air space and became a favorite target .  

                Debris from homes became fire wood for heat ,  caves were carved out of dirt to survive the bombing and the  inferno fires , over 700,000 had to flee the city .  The Edelweiss took to stealing from the Military just to survive , food meant survival .  Women and  Teenage Boys served as ambulance drivers , and they were only BMW motorcycles equipped to  carry two wounded citizens  .  There were no full ambulances in most locations , fuel was a precious  commodity , so motorcycles were the normal ambulance .  Hiding a Jew meant execution.  yet the Edelweiss actively did battle with the SS .   They even murdered the head of the Gestapo , and 13 were hung in public at the train station . 

                 see  ' My Edelweiss Boys "  Miss Margarida Brei was my co writer , she was so talented I put it in her name , she is an English Professor in Houston  .            


              On Sun, Sep 29, 2013 at 2:57 PM, Jo-Ann Power <wjpower@...> wrote:
               

              I totally agree with your assessment that because this is a "war" story told from the perspective of women who are nonetheless "back of the line" the novel has a readership in women of all ages. A few men will give it a go as well because they want to see the activity back of the front and frankly, few war books or movies do show that.

              As a result the discussion of heroism will, I hope, be widened to include definitions we rarely ascribe to it. One of the biggest challenges to these nurses, especially the ones in the mobile surgical units up one mile in back of advancing line is to see and address horrific wounds of shells, bullets, bombs, and gas which have no equal in civilian hospital context, especially for frequency.

              I hope this book too serves to broaden the understanding here in the US of the challenges of those who served in the Great War and what that war truly means to all of us now.
               
              Jo-Ann Power
              HEROIC MEASURES
              In a war-torn world, one woman discovers the measures of her own heroism.
              Coming this Armistice Day, November 11
              For a preview of how these women served: http://theyalsofought.blogspot.com  
              Award-winning author of fiction and non at  www.jo-annpower.com


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