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Re: Historical Novel Society researchc books

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  • Susan Hicks
    Goodness, my collection continues to increase . My research books are the core of my knowledge base. The internet is a fantastic research tool with hitherto
    Message 1 of 12 , Jul 1, 2013
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      Goodness, my collection continues to increase . My research books are the core of my knowledge base. The internet is a fantastic research tool with hitherto inaccessible information up there for all. In my case the Pipe Rolls of Henry II for example or the letters of Eleanor of Aquitaine, or the collection of the British Museum. But it’s only there while my internet connections is good and while I have the time to trawl through what are often masses of the most awful detritus to get at the good stuff. With books at least I’ve already fine tuned the good stuff and can put my hands on it straight away. When I shuffle off the mortal coil, I am leaving my nearest and dearest details of the big money books in my collection (as they won’t know one title from another) and the address of a 2nd hand bookseller in Oxford who deals exclusively with the medieval period. so they’ll be able to sell on usefully.
      I guess if you have to downsize due to circumstances, then you will have to cherry pick the books that are of most frequent use, and you could perhaps scan pertinent details from others onto your PC.
      My books are subject arranged on my shelves and I have the sort of memory that remembers (mostly!) what information is in which book.

      Best
      Susan
      www.elizabethchadwick.com
      THE SUMMER QUEEN: LittleBrown Sphere June 2013. UK hardcover bestseller
      “Meticulous research and strong storytelling” Woman and Home
      “The Summer Queen is historical fiction at its best and I loved every page of it.” Kate Atherton.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jeannette de Beauvoir
      ... I m not very good at getting rid of books, so I won t answer that section. But as for keeping research itself within easy reach, I love love love
      Message 2 of 12 , Jul 1, 2013
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        > On the same "researchy" topic, I used to use PFS File to keep track of
        > research and to create a chronology for my books. Before that, I used 3 x 5
        > cards divided by topic index tabs (dating myself here). How are you keeping
        > tack of your research? How are you creating chronologies & timelines to
        > help you keep track of your information & stories? I'm hoping there are
        > computer programs to help with this, since PFS is no longer used.


        I'm not very good at getting rid of books, so I won't answer that section. But as for keeping research itself within easy reach, I love love love Scrivener. It provides niches for timelines, characters, and so on—the more you explore, the more possibilities open up as to how it can help you. It's available from Literature and Latte (I have no affiliation with the company, I'm just a very happy customer). Check it out!

        Jeannette

        ***
        Read Shadowland, a short story about the best and worst times in a WWII veteran's life, just .99 at http://tinyurl.com/6zeneg6
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      • CFliedner@...
        Hello, Sandy. Believe me. The books I ve culled from my collection have all gone to libraries. Most have been sold through the Friends to raise funds to
        Message 3 of 12 , Jul 1, 2013
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          Hello, Sandy. Believe me. The books I've culled from my collection have
          all gone to libraries. Most have been sold through the "Friends" to raise
          funds to support the libraries.

          Thanks for your input!

          Colleen


          In a message dated 6/30/2013 7:54:42 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
          lemobrn@... writes:

          Even though there were subsequent editions, I kept a first edition of a
          book on Maternal-Fetal medicine because of the illustrations.

          *Laura Mitchell, RN w/a Ellen Campbell*
          *Peninsular War Bookworm and 95th Rifles Groupie
          *



          On Sun, Jun 30, 2013 at 7:51 PM, Sandy Frykholm <frykhaven@...>
          wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > Even when I can find the info online, if I think a book has a lot of
          > relevant information, I’d rather have the book itself. And I would NOT
          > throw away the research books, but would donate them to friends of the
          > library, give away on freecycle, or find another way to dispose of them.
          > The landfill is the last resort. I recently offered a duplicate free to
          the
          > first taker, online via a Facebook group of writers. It was gone in a
          > jiffy, and I think in this kind of situation, most ‘takers’ would be
          glad
          > to cover the postage for a book of interest.
          >
          > I will also be downsizing substantially in the next year or so, so I’ll
          > have a chance to test my own theories.
          > Sandy Frykholm
          > www.theitaliansouth.com
          >
          > From: CFliedner@...
          > Sent: Sunday, June 30, 2013 4:24 PM
          > To: historicalnovelsociety@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: Historical Novel Society researchc books
          >
          > I'm sure that (like me) all of you have tons of research books. Boxes in
          > the garage? Crowded bookshelves? I've collected them for years, buying
          > books with details covering everything from the development of toilets
          and
          > plumbing, to types of carriages, to clothing styles...and on and on. I've
          > hauled my library around each time we've moved, getting rid of those I
          > thought I would no longer use. Now, as I anticipate a future move into a
          > smaller
          > house, I know I need to get rid of much of my collection.
          >
          > A friend of mine who writes historical romance says she finds those kinds
          > of details online. But when I searched online for information about how
          > milk was delivered to homes in cities (bottles I assumed) in the 1800s, I
          > came
          > up empty-handed. Then I went to my book, Domestic Technology, and found
          > the answer.
          >
          > What are all of you doing with your research books? Are most of you
          > doing your research on the Internet these days? It would certainly be
          > wonderful if I didn't have to haul around hundreds of books in the
          future.
          > Have
          > any of you found some good research websites that would answer the kinds
          > of
          > detailed questions that we historians and novelists need to look up?
          >
          > On the same "researchy" topic, I used to use PFS File to keep track of
          > research and to create a chronology for my books. Before that, I used 3
          x
          > 5
          > cards divided by topic index tabs (dating myself here). How are you
          > keeping
          > tack of your research? How are you creating chronologies & timelines to
          > help you keep track of your information & stories? I'm hoping there are
          > computer programs to help with this, since PFS is no longer used.
          >
          > Thanks so much.
          >
          > Colleen Fliedner
          > _www.colleenfliedner.com_ (http://www.colleenfliedner.com)
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          ------------------------------------

          If you're not already a member, why not JOIN the HNS? Email Richard for
          details (richard@...) or join by credit card online
          via our website at www.historicalnovelsociety.org

          Also, you might want to receive the HNS Newsletter (an edited
          magazine-style publication featuring news and reviews from the UK and US; it comes
          every two weeks, and it's free). Send a blank email to
          HNSNewsletter-subscribe@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • philly10285
          I would keep the research books you own. I do extensive research on the internet (Elizabethan times, Egyptian era), and there is amazing stuff online, but like
          Message 4 of 12 , Jul 1, 2013
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            I would keep the research books you own.
            I do extensive research on the internet (Elizabethan times, Egyptian era), and there is amazing stuff online, but like you, when it comes down to a very specific detail such as milk delivery, I've been able to find those in books only and not online.

            They have a lot of material at the library. This helps me with topics that I need only temporarily, for the duration of writing that novel, etc. You can give those back when done and don't need to store them in an already crammed shelf.

            Books will often list extensive reference material in the back, which helps even further. Plus the photographs are priceless for us writers. For writing about what it might be like to get undressed in Elizabethan times, I found a lovely book called The Tudor Tailor, with photographs of undergarments. It's not the sort of thing you can read on a Kindle. :-)

            Philine Tucker
          • Sandra Gulland
            What to do with books? This is something I m always grappling with. I live half the year in Mexico, and half in Canada. This is not an easy transition for a
            Message 5 of 12 , Jul 2, 2013
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              What to do with books? This is something I'm always grappling with.

              I live half the year in Mexico, and half in Canada. This is not an easy transition for a historical novelist! Digital libraries are a tremendous help, but there are many books that are only available in print -- and these are usually the most crucial ones. I ship books back and forth, but the selection has to be really culled down. Plus, how do I know what I'm going to need months ahead of time? I've been known to tear books apart and scan the contents into my computer. (I love my ScanSnap!)

              Almost 15 years ago, on the publication of the last of my Josephine B. Trilogy, I sold the lion's share of my Napoleonic library collection in order to make room for books on the 17th century. I thought I would be in the 17th century for the rest of my life. Ha! I'm now writing a YA about Josephine's daughter Hortense, and there are books I do wish I still had—books that cost a small fortune now and are not available on-line. Sigh.

              And now: where to put the books on the 17th century in order to make room for the growing stacks of books on Hortense? And which of these are going with me to Mexico? It's only July 2—we don't leave for 4 months, but already I'm feeling anxious.

              Sandra Gulland

              Coming in March of 2014: THE SHADOW QUEEN
              "Truly magnificent and an absolute joy to read." — International bestseller, M.J. Rose
              "Masterful." — Tasha Alexander, NYT Bestselling Author of Death in the Floating City

              *****
              Website: http://www.sandragulland.com/
              Blog: http://bit.ly/writinglife
              Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/novelistSandraGulland
              Twitter: http://twitter.com/Sandra_Gulland
            • K
              In general, I far prefer to read something in a book than on the internet, but I use both. I don t like to read books electronically (kindle, etc), so often
              Message 6 of 12 , Jul 3, 2013
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                In general, I far prefer to read something in a book than on the internet, but I use both. I don't like to read books electronically (kindle, etc), so often print useful things or look for references in books & try to get copies of them from the library or buy them sometimes.

                Karin

                --- In HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com, Sandra Gulland <sgulland@...> wrote:
                >
                > What to do with books? This is something I'm always grappling with.
                >
                > I live half the year in Mexico, and half in Canada. This is not an easy transition for a historical novelist! Digital libraries are a tremendous help, but there are many books that are only available in print -- and these are usually the most crucial ones. I ship books back and forth, but the selection has to be really culled down. Plus, how do I know what I'm going to need months ahead of time? I've been known to tear books apart and scan the contents into my computer. (I love my ScanSnap!)
                >
                > Almost 15 years ago, on the publication of the last of my Josephine B. Trilogy, I sold the lion's share of my Napoleonic library collection in order to make room for books on the 17th century. I thought I would be in the 17th century for the rest of my life. Ha! I'm now writing a YA about Josephine's daughter Hortense, and there are books I do wish I still had—books that cost a small fortune now and are not available on-line. Sigh.
                >
                > And now: where to put the books on the 17th century in order to make room for the growing stacks of books on Hortense? And which of these are going with me to Mexico? It's only July 2—we don't leave for 4 months, but already I'm feeling anxious.
                >
                > Sandra Gulland
                >
                > Coming in March of 2014: THE SHADOW QUEEN
                > "Truly magnificent and an absolute joy to read." — International bestseller, M.J. Rose
                > "Masterful." — Tasha Alexander, NYT Bestselling Author of Death in the Floating City
                >
                > *****
                > Website: http://www.sandragulland.com/
                > Blog: http://bit.ly/writinglife
                > Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/novelistSandraGulland
                > Twitter: http://twitter.com/Sandra_Gulland
                >
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