Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Historical Novel Society The Importance of Accuracy in History

Expand Messages
  • K
    Weekly TV shows don t get the major editing & rewriting that movies do, but they do get some; it s not as though the scripts are being written weekly.
    Message 1 of 36 , Feb 26, 2013
      Weekly TV shows don't get the major editing & rewriting that movies do, but they do get some; it's not as though the scripts are being written weekly. Something to bear in mind is that not everything filmed gets into the show and that things can be changed almost on the spot.

      This morning I chatted with a Baptist pastor I know who owns a store in the neighbouring town and asked him about all of this. He agreed with all of the diversity we've found and said that is a huge variety in different kinds of Bapstist groups & churches. Although the charismatic groups are very much a minority in the Baptist churches. He said that in his experience the one group of Baptists that tends to be pretty much the same wherever you go are the Southern Baptists.

      As for a woman in her 50s being totally set defined, even though it's common for people become more set in their ways as they get older, I have known a number women (and men) in their fifties and even older to suddenly depart from their ways and habits. Some people will renounce or pick up religion, try new forms of travel, etc. I don't think that that TV show was even dealing with that, anyway.

      As for facts vs truths, I also agree that one has to prove that 99 percent of facts aren't verifiable. How can you tell? If you're writing straight historical fiction (as opposed to alternative history) then it is important to be as historically accurate as you can and to do your research.

      Sometimes, sources disagree or are wrong and then there's quite a connundrum. How many know that Marconi failed to invent a radio that carried the human voice and that he ended up licensing Fessenden's invention (verifiable)? How many know that someone else claims someone in the midwest had done that earlier (haven't verified that and the question that begs to be answered is if that is so, why wasn't it produced?) That Edison, who invented many things, didn't actually invent the lightbulb but merely perfected it from a patent he bought from a Canadian inventor?

      I don't want to read about a fire alarm system with an alarm in each neighbourhood in New York City in 1845 when the first one was put into place in Boston after that time. Of course, if I hadn't researched that for something I was writing, it probably wouldn't bother me. However, since many people like to use historical fiction to augment history classes, it helps a great deal if that fiction is historically accurate. It also helps anyone who happens to know enough about a certain time period.

      Karin

      --- In HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com, Don Maker <englishessaytutor@...> wrote:
      >
      > "People who create fiction: novels, tv or movies really do try their best to form a composite with their characters. It isn't easy to juggle all the parts that form a whole human being and then
      > project that to a fictional character, trying to bring that character life as realistically as possible."
      >  
      > Debra, I heartily agree! I tell people who will ask (not many, in my case ...) that the difference between people who write "non-fiction" and we writers of "historical fiction" is that we are obligated to make the people in our works interesting. Cheers, DOn
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: "FerchArthur@..." <FerchArthur@...>
      > To: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Monday, February 25, 2013 2:25 PM
      > Subject: Re: Historical Novel Society The Importance of Accuracy in History
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 2/25/2013 4:15:55 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
      > mailto:englishessaytutor%40yahoo.com writes:
      >
      > Therefore, I feel my fictionalized version of something is quite often as
      > valid as what those "non-fiction" sources tell you. Cheers, Don
      >
      > A very true statement, Don. People who create fiction: novels, tv or
      > movies really do try their best to form a composite with their characters. It
      > isn't easy to juggle all the parts that form a whole human being and then
      > project that to a fictional character, trying to bring that character life
      > as realistically as possible.
      >
      > Debra A. Kemp
      > Feminist Arthurian fiction:
      > Face the Dark Side of Camelot
      > _http://amberquill.com/Firebrand.html_
      > (http://amberquill.com/Firebrand.html)
      > _http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?ref=profile&id=723233203_
      > (http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?ref=profile&id=723233203)
      > _http://debrakemp.blogspot.com/_ (http://debrakemp.blogspot.com/)
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Julianne Lee
      ... In my novel on the subject, neither do I. Julianne Lee The Opening Night Murder writing as Anne Rutherford Berkley Publishing, January 2013 [Non-text
      Message 36 of 36 , Feb 27, 2013
        On 2/26/2013 11:03 AM, Don Maker wrote:
        >
        > I doubt seriously that Mary -- or even Bonner -- really enjoyed those
        > burnings, any more than Elizabeth enjoyed killing the people who were
        > executed under her reign. It was something monarchs did to maintain
        > their power. In my novel, I don't portray either queen as "bloody".
        >

        In my novel on the subject, neither do I.

        Julianne Lee
        "The Opening Night Murder"
        writing as Anne Rutherford
        Berkley Publishing, January 2013


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.