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Re: : 80s computers

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  • Joanna Waugh
    My first computer was an Apple IIe (Apple Two-e) circa 1983ish with two 5 1/2 inch floppy drives.   Joanna Waugh BLIND FORTUNE weaving Regency history into
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 1, 2012
      My first computer was an Apple IIe (Apple Two-e) circa 1983ish with two 5 1/2 inch floppy drives.
       

      Joanna Waugh
      BLIND FORTUNE
      weaving Regency history into timeless romance
      www.JoannaWaugh.com


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Don Maker
      My first computer was an interesting blend of a set of rotating stone tablets, a chisel and an abacus, but I m a lot older than most of you. Cheers, Don
      Message 2 of 16 , Apr 1, 2012
        My first computer was an interesting blend of a set of rotating stone tablets, a chisel and an abacus, but I'm a lot older than most of you. Cheers, Don



        ________________________________
        From: Joanna Waugh <joanna.waugh@...>
        To: "HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com" <HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, April 1, 2012 6:00 AM
        Subject: Historical Novel Society Re: : 80s computers


         
        My first computer was an Apple IIe (Apple Two-e) circa 1983ish with two 5 1/2 inch floppy drives.
         

        Joanna Waugh
        BLIND FORTUNE
        weaving Regency history into timeless romance
        www.JoannaWaugh.com

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Patricia Rich
        I guess I ll get into the discussion too. In 1987 I started my business and went to buy my first computer. In each store the sales MEN immediately addressed
        Message 3 of 16 , Apr 1, 2012
          I guess I'll get into the discussion too. In 1987 I started my business and went to buy my first computer. In each store the sales MEN immediately addressed all their remarks to him, despite his frequent statement that it was his wife who was buying it for herself.
          The computer made all the difference---I didn't need an assistant for quite a while for regular office and administrative tasks, and of course, for writing, revising, and creating very attractive final copy.
          A few years later I hired my first male assistant who was an early computer whiz who got us on the internet!!! Wow! Were we advanced!
          Patricia Rich
          http://patwritinganne.blogspot.com


          From: Don Maker
          Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2012 12:16 PM
          To: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: Historical Novel Society Re: : 80s computers



          My first computer was an interesting blend of a set of rotating stone tablets, a chisel and an abacus, but I'm a lot older than most of you. Cheers, Don

          ________________________________
          From: Joanna Waugh <joanna.waugh@...>
          To: "HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com" <HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, April 1, 2012 6:00 AM
          Subject: Historical Novel Society Re: : 80s computers



          My first computer was an Apple IIe (Apple Two-e) circa 1983ish with two 5 1/2 inch floppy drives.


          Joanna Waugh
          BLIND FORTUNE
          weaving Regency history into timeless romance
          www.JoannaWaugh.com

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Patricia Rich
          Something strange happened to my last post: a line disappeared. I had said that my husband came along with me when I went to buy my first computer; then the
          Message 4 of 16 , Apr 1, 2012
            Something strange happened to my last post: a line disappeared. I had said that my husband came along with me when I went to buy my first computer; then the sales men spoke to him, not me.....
            Patricia Rich

            http://patwritinganne.blogspot.com


            From: Patricia Rich
            Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2012 1:13 PM
            To: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: Historical Novel Society Re: : 80s computers



            I guess I'll get into the discussion too. In 1987 I started my business and went to buy my first computer. In each store the sales MEN immediately addressed all their remarks to him, despite his frequent statement that it was his wife who was buying it for herself.
            The computer made all the difference---I didn't need an assistant for quite a while for regular office and administrative tasks, and of course, for writing, revising, and creating very attractive final copy.
            A few years later I hired my first male assistant who was an early computer whiz who got us on the internet!!! Wow! Were we advanced!
            Patricia Rich
            http://patwritinganne.blogspot.com

            From: Don Maker
            Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2012 12:16 PM
            To: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: Historical Novel Society Re: : 80s computers

            My first computer was an interesting blend of a set of rotating stone tablets, a chisel and an abacus, but I'm a lot older than most of you. Cheers, Don

            ________________________________
            From: Joanna Waugh <joanna.waugh@...>
            To: "HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com" <HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sunday, April 1, 2012 6:00 AM
            Subject: Historical Novel Society Re: : 80s computers

            My first computer was an Apple IIe (Apple Two-e) circa 1983ish with two 5 1/2 inch floppy drives.


            Joanna Waugh
            BLIND FORTUNE
            weaving Regency history into timeless romance
            www.JoannaWaugh.com

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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          • Marilyn Morris
            LMAO!! Very clever.  Marilyn Celeste Morris, Author, Editor and Speaker Five novels, two non fiction books All available on Amazon.com:
            Message 5 of 16 , Apr 1, 2012
              LMAO!! Very clever. 

              Marilyn Celeste Morris, Author, Editor and Speaker
              Five novels, two non fiction books All available on Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=Marilyn+Celeste+Morris&x=15&y=20
              and at Vanilla Heart Publishing http://www.vanillaheartbooksandauthors.com/Marilyn_Morris.html
              "You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you." -- Ray Bradbury


                
               

              --- On Sun, 4/1/12, Don Maker <englishessaytutor@...> wrote:

              From: Don Maker <englishessaytutor@...>
              Subject: Re: Historical Novel Society Re: : 80s computers
              To: "HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com" <HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com>
              Date: Sunday, April 1, 2012, 11:16 AM

              My first computer was an interesting blend of a set of rotating stone tablets, a chisel and an abacus, but I'm a lot older than most of you. Cheers, Don



              ________________________________
              From: Joanna Waugh <joanna.waugh@...>
              To: "HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com" <HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Sunday, April 1, 2012 6:00 AM
              Subject: Historical Novel Society Re: : 80s computers


               
              My first computer was an Apple IIe (Apple Two-e) circa 1983ish with two 5 1/2 inch floppy drives.
               

              Joanna Waugh
              BLIND FORTUNE
              weaving Regency history into timeless romance
              www.JoannaWaugh.com

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              ------------------------------------

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            • Pat Brown
              Our first computer was an Atari. It had no hard drive and ran off disks. It was great for writing, but when we moved up to a 286 (wow, the power) there was no
              Message 6 of 16 , Apr 1, 2012
                Our first computer was an Atari. It had no hard drive and ran off disks. It
                was great for writing, but when we moved up to a 286 (wow, the power) there
                was no way to convert what was on the disks to my new word processor. I
                ended up rewriting the entire novel. Ouch.

                The Atari had one thing -- River Raiders, my first online game, though for
                the most part I never did get into computer games. I had to wait to get my
                iPhone to become addicted to Angry Birds and Cut the Rope. LOL. And it's
                all my daughter's fault.

                I did start fooling around with DOS and managed to format the hard drive at
                one point. Lesson learned. But eventually I learn enough to make several
                useful tools.

                Here's a link to a site with some great PC problems tech support get. I
                worked in IT for over a decade but fortunately I never had to work the help
                desk. I did onsite troubleshooting, but then I didn't have to trust the
                user to tell me what was wrong.

                http://www.rinkworks.com/stupid/cs_piecing.shtml

                Pat Brown

                http://pabrown.com/
                Pushing the envelope on romance


                On Sun, Apr 1, 2012 at 1:40 PM, Patricia Rich <prich@...> wrote:

                > **
                >
                >
                > Something strange happened to my last post: a line disappeared. I had said
                > that my husband came along with me when I went to buy my first computer;
                > then the sales men spoke to him, not me.....
                > Patricia Rich
                >
                > http://patwritinganne.blogspot.com
                >
                > From: Patricia Rich
                > Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2012 1:13 PM
                >
                > To: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: Historical Novel Society Re: : 80s computers
                >
                > I guess I'll get into the discussion too. In 1987 I started my business
                > and went to buy my first computer. In each store the sales MEN immediately
                > addressed all their remarks to him, despite his frequent statement that it
                > was his wife who was buying it for herself.
                > The computer made all the difference---I didn't need an assistant for
                > quite a while for regular office and administrative tasks, and of course,
                > for writing, revising, and creating very attractive final copy.
                > A few years later I hired my first male assistant who was an early
                > computer whiz who got us on the internet!!! Wow! Were we advanced!
                > Patricia Rich
                > http://patwritinganne.blogspot.com
                >
                > From: Don Maker
                > Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2012 12:16 PM
                > To: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: Historical Novel Society Re: : 80s computers
                >
                > My first computer was an interesting blend of a set of rotating stone
                > tablets, a chisel and an abacus, but I'm a lot older than most of you.
                > Cheers, Don
                >
                > ________________________________
                > From: Joanna Waugh <joanna.waugh@...>
                > To: "HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com" <
                > HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Sunday, April 1, 2012 6:00 AM
                > Subject: Historical Novel Society Re: : 80s computers
                >
                > My first computer was an Apple IIe (Apple Two-e) circa 1983ish with two 5
                > 1/2 inch floppy drives.
                >
                > Joanna Waugh
                > BLIND FORTUNE
                > weaving Regency history into timeless romance
                > www.JoannaWaugh.com
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >


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              • Julianne Lee
                ... The first computer I ever wrote on was one of those, and I wasn t particularly bowled over with writing on it. My own first computer was a PC/2, with
                Message 7 of 16 , Apr 2, 2012
                  At 08:00 AM 4/1/2012, you wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >My first computer was an Apple IIe (Apple Two-e) circa 1983ish with
                  >two 5 1/2 inch floppy drives.

                  The first computer I ever wrote on was one of those, and I
                  wasn't particularly bowled over with writing on it. My own first
                  computer was a PC/2, with Windows. I think I liked it better at the
                  time because I could fool with how it looked and I wasn't writing on
                  the same line at the bottom of the screen all the time. The first
                  several years of using a computer were a difficult transition from
                  writing longhand and entering data. I eventually learned to
                  touch-type, and the past decade or so of writing under contract has
                  cured me of having to compose in longhand. I'm now up to 56 wpm, and
                  can type faster than I can compose.


                  Julianne Lee

                  http://www.julianneardianlee.com
                  "Her Mother's Daughter: A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor"
                  Berkley, 2009


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Julianne Lee
                  ... I also began as a twelve-year-old writing in a school notebook with a pencil, ca. 1969. Even in 1985 I was using lined notebooks and colored pens. I liked
                  Message 8 of 16 , Apr 2, 2012
                    At 11:16 AM 4/1/2012, you wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >My first computer was an interesting blend of a set of rotating
                    >stone tablets, a chisel and an abacus, but I'm a lot older than most
                    >of you. Cheers, Don

                    I also began as a twelve-year-old writing in a school
                    notebook with a pencil, ca. 1969. Even in 1985 I was using lined
                    notebooks and colored pens. I liked the colors because they amused
                    me. For years after I finally acquired a typewriter, then a computer,
                    I still had to compose in longhand then enter the data afterward. The
                    creative brain just wouldn't kick in if I was at a keyboard.


                    Julianne Lee

                    http://www.julianneardianlee.com
                    "Her Mother's Daughter: A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor"
                    Berkley, 2009


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Julianne Lee
                    ... I judge the intelligence and credibility of a salesman by whether/how he picks up on the fact that I m the one making the final decision and so I m the one
                    Message 9 of 16 , Apr 2, 2012
                      >MEN immediately addressed all their remarks to him, despite his
                      >frequent statement that it was his wife who was buying it for herself.

                      I judge the intelligence and credibility of a salesman by
                      whether/how he picks up on the fact that I'm the one making the final
                      decision and so I'm the one he needs to sell. I rarely buy from guys
                      who don't get it.


                      Julianne Lee

                      http://www.julianneardianlee.com
                      "Her Mother's Daughter: A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor"
                      Berkley, 2009


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Julianne Lee
                      ... I had to do that for half a novel I started when I was taking a computer class in WP 5.1 (DOS) then transferred to my new windows machine in 92 and got
                      Message 10 of 16 , Apr 2, 2012
                        >was no way to convert what was on the disks to my new word processor. I
                        >ended up rewriting the entire novel. Ouch.

                        I had to do that for half a novel I started when I was
                        taking a computer class in WP 5.1 (DOS) then transferred to my new
                        windows machine in '92 and got Works. It was a relief to not have to
                        have that reference cardboard on the keyboard.


                        Julianne Lee

                        http://www.julianneardianlee.com
                        "Her Mother's Daughter: A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor"
                        Berkley, 2009


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Pat Brown
                        My brother has a degree in Computer Science he got in the 70s when you punched holes in paper to tell the machine what to do. He now manages a high tech
                        Message 11 of 16 , Apr 2, 2012
                          My brother has a degree in Computer Science he got in the 70s when you
                          punched holes in paper to tell the machine what to do. He now manages a
                          high tech company and he doesn't have a clue how computers work today.

                          An amusing aside. He brought boxes of those punch cards home from school
                          when the language changed. They were pink and about as long as a trade
                          paperback and half as wide. They made great scratch paper and bookmarks, We
                          were still using them less than a decade ago so he must have brought
                          thousands home.

                          I loved Wordperfect. I used it for years until I had to switch. I've used
                          MS Office up to 2000, but as soon as I found OpenOffice I only used Word on
                          various jobs. I've been using OO for over 4 years now. I especially like it
                          since I can open almost all types of text files, including WP, docx and
                          Works.

                          I loved WordPerfect's ability to look at the code of a document.

                          Pat Brown

                          http://pabrown.com/
                          Pushing the envelope on romance


                          On Mon, Apr 2, 2012 at 12:21 PM, Julianne Lee
                          <lists@...>wrote:

                          > **
                          >
                          >
                          > I had to do that for half a novel I started when I was
                          > taking a computer class in WP 5.1 (DOS) then transferred to my new
                          > windows machine in '92 and got Works. It was a relief to not have to
                          > have that reference cardboard on the keyboard.
                          >
                          >


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • sidney allinson
                          ... You are a writer after my own heart, Julianne! To this day, I often tell beginning writers: “A pencil is still the best word-processor.” Which puzzles
                          Message 12 of 16 , Apr 2, 2012
                            >My first computer was an interesting blend of a set of rotating
                            >stone tablets, a chisel and an abacus, but I'm a lot older than most
                            >of you. Cheers, Don

                            >>I also began as a twelve-year-old writing in a school
                            >>notebook with a pencil, ca. 1969. Even in 1985 I was using lined
                            >>notebooks and colored pens. I liked the colors because they amused
                            >>me. For years after I finally acquired a typewriter, then a computer,
                            >>I still had to compose in longhand then enter the data afterward. The
                            >>creative brain just wouldn't kick in if I was at a keyboard.
                            >>Julianne Lee
                            You are a writer after my own heart, Julianne!
                            To this day, I often tell beginning writers: “A pencil is still the
                            best word-processor.”
                            Which puzzles most people, now, of course. Inconceivable,
                            especially to young people. Still, I prefer to write first drafts of
                            my books and articles with a pencil or pen, Like you, my brain
                            seems to flow thoughts and words down my arm to a pencil
                            more readily than tapping a keyboard. I still have to transcribe
                            the story onto onto a computer eventually, but by then all my
                            real creative writing has been done, by hand.
                            -- Sidney.
                            http://urlcut.me/a2P




                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Don Maker
                            I also began as a twelve-year-old writing in a school notebook with a pencil, ca. 1969. Even in 1985 I was using lined notebooks and colored pens. I liked the
                            Message 13 of 16 , Apr 3, 2012
                              "I also began as a twelve-year-old writing in a school
                              notebook with a pencil, ca. 1969. Even in 1985 I was using lined
                              notebooks and colored pens. I liked the colors because they amused
                              me. For years after I finally acquired a typewriter, then a computer,
                              I still had to compose in longhand then enter the data afterward. The
                              creative brain just wouldn't kick in if I was at a keyboard."
                              Julianne Lee

                              I wrote my first novel longhand. My wife, a great typist, typed it for me. Later I learned to type my own (with a little help from my wife refusing to type them anymore!). I finally learned how to type on a computer, then edit. Now I've got Dragon Speak! On our next trip to Europe, I'll use a tape recorder to make my notes for my travel articles so I can just play them into Dragon. How times have changed! Cheers, Don

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Julianne Lee
                              ... Even though I now compose my novels at a keyboard, often for short pieces I still use pen and paper. I believe the reason younger folks prefer computers is
                              Message 14 of 16 , Apr 3, 2012
                                >To this day, I often tell beginning writers: “A pencil is still the
                                >best word-processor.”

                                Even though I now compose my novels at a
                                keyboard, often for short pieces I still use pen
                                and paper. I believe the reason younger folks
                                prefer computers is that a longhand page looks
                                awfully messy once you've crossed things out and
                                drawn arrows to move things around. I sometimes
                                have to resist the urge to keep something not
                                quite right just to avoid having huge cross-outs.
                                But to me, writing longhand helps me to remember
                                what it was like to just doodle, and keeps the internal editor silent.


                                Julianne Lee

                                http://www.julianneardianlee.com
                                "Her Mother's Daughter: A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor"
                                Berkley, 2009


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • joanszechtman
                                On the other hand, having worked on computers since 1969, and being a creative speller to the point where I can t even look up a word in the dictionary
                                Message 15 of 16 , Apr 3, 2012
                                  On the other hand, having worked on computers since 1969, and being a
                                  "creative" speller to the point where I can't even look up a word in the
                                  dictionary because the first three letters aren't correct, can't write
                                  much beyond notes to myself and shopping lists by hand. This is to the
                                  point where I have to first compose notes on the computer that I will
                                  transcribe to hand written cards for that "personal" touch. :-P

                                  Joan
                                  ---
                                  This Time--General Fiction Finalist of 2010 Next Generation Indie Book
                                  Awards
                                  Loyalty Binds Me--recommended by Midwest Book reviews
                                  website <http://www.joanszechtman.com/> -- blog
                                  <http://rtoaaa.blogspot.com/> --trailer <http://youtu.be/O49HPSN08NI>
                                  ebooks at Smashwords
                                  <http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/JoanSzechtman>


                                  --- In HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com, Julianne Lee <lists@...>
                                  wrote:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > >To this day, I often tell beginning writers: “A pencil is
                                  still the
                                  > >best word-processor.”
                                  >
                                  > Even though I now compose my novels at a
                                  > keyboard, often for short pieces I still use pen
                                  > and paper. I believe the reason younger folks
                                  > prefer computers is that a longhand page looks
                                  > awfully messy once you've crossed things out and
                                  > drawn arrows to move things around. I sometimes
                                  > have to resist the urge to keep something not
                                  > quite right just to avoid having huge cross-outs.
                                  > But to me, writing longhand helps me to remember
                                  > what it was like to just doodle, and keeps the internal editor silent.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Julianne Lee
                                  >
                                  > http://www.julianneardianlee.com
                                  > "Her Mother's Daughter: A Novel of Queen Mary Tudor"
                                  > Berkley, 2009
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  >



                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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