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Historical Novel Society Question about writing accents/dialiect.

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  • Pat Brown
    I find it works best if you drop in bits of said dialect. A word here and there. I do it in mine, plus for Spanish speakers I use the occasional Spanish where
    Message 1 of 80 , Jan 1, 2012
      I find it works best if you drop in bits of said dialect. A word here and
      there. I do it in mine, plus for Spanish speakers I use the occasional
      Spanish where it's easy to tell the meaning. But yes, too much will be
      tedious

      On Saturday, December 31, 2011, CeliaY <celiayeary@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Dedicated lurker, here, and I have a question about writing dialogue as
      > it might sound. Is this advisable? Example: "The king would 'ave me 'ead
      > if he knew I was talkin' ta ye." I know it's difficult to continue
      > writing in this manner. Do readers like this? Or does it annoy them?
      > What do you do? Does any specific rule apply to this situation? Thank
      > you...
      > Celia Yeary-Romance...and a little bit 'o Texas
      > http://www.celiayeary.blogspot.com <http://www.celiayeary.blogspot.com/>
      > http://www.celiayeary.com <http://www.celiayeary.com/>
      >
      > http://sweetheartsofthewest.blogspot.com
      > <http://sweetheartsofthewest.blogspot.com/>
      >
      > http://www.facebook.com/pages/Celia-Yeary-Author/208687145867971
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >

      --
      Pat Brown

      http://pabrown.com/
      Can love heal past mistakes


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Kilian Metcalf
      Heck is the place where people go who don t believe in Gosh. Kilian Metcalf www.benigneditor.com * * *On Wed, Jan 4, 2012 at 5:23 PM, Harlan Hague
      Message 80 of 80 , Jan 5, 2012
        Heck is the place where people go who don't believe in Gosh.

        Kilian Metcalf
        www.benigneditor.com

        *

        *
        *On Wed, Jan 4, 2012 at 5:23 PM, Harlan Hague <harlanhague@...
        > wrote:
        *
        >
        > * *
        >
        > *A useful technique. In Texas, dadgummit and dingnabit were´┐Żand
        > are´┐Żsubstitutes for goddammit. There are many such substitutes, not just
        > for references to a deity, but for various four-letter words that have made
        > their way into the folklore.*
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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