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Re: Historical Novel Society All washed up

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  • Peggy Ullman Bell
    I s pose I must concede that historical romance readers are a special breed as, in my never humble opinion are romance writers.  I no longer read pulp
    Message 1 of 60 , May 1 3:27 AM
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      I s'pose I must concede that historical "romance" readers are a special breed as, in my never humble opinion are "romance" writers.  I no longer read pulp fiction in any genre.
       
      I find it regretable that so many publishers and readers lump historical fiction and "romance" in the same catagory.

      Peggy Jay
       
      www.peggyullmanbell.com
       
      "No matter how contemporary you think your novel is, it's all historical fiction by the time it hits amazon.com."

      --- On Thu, 4/30/09, Susan Hicks <Susan.Hicks1@...> wrote:


      From: Susan Hicks <Susan.Hicks1@...>
      Subject: Re: Historical Novel Society All washed up
      To: HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, April 30, 2009, 6:12 PM








      Peggy wrote:

      This image of American readers amazed me as an American reader. All I can
      think of to say is that you must be referring to a generation of readers
      with whom I am unfamiliar.

      That's not to tar everyone with the same brush and attitudes do vary. I
      don't take things on hearsay and I do take them with a large pinch of salt,
      but I did actually see the 'Eeeeuwww I couldn't read about someone who
      didn't brush their teeth" discussion on Amazon.com for myself on a
      historical romance reader discussion forum and was rather astonished. I
      quite often drop by the historical fiction and the historical romance forums
      over ther for a looksee.
      Then, I was discussing how until recently I hadn't been able to find a USA
      publishers for my novels with one of the stellar names of USA historical
      romance. She wasn't au fait with the nitty gritty of my work but knew I
      wrote medievals and thought that it was romance as such. She told me that
      Medieval romance was a hard sell in the USA because of the 'dirt and smelly
      mud-hovel' perception. It could be done, but it wasn't easy and it wasn't
      flavour of the month. So having seen it with my own eyes and heard it from
      a writer well positioned to be in the know, I have to accept that it may
      well be the case.
      As it is, I now have a USA publisher for The Greatest Knight and my editor
      tells me that advance orders from the booksellers are looking very healthy
      indeed - but while it might cross over to some romance readers it's more of
      a mainstream historical read rather than category - so the dirt obviously
      isn't quite so much of an issue. :-). I find attitudes fascinating!

      All best
      Susan
      www.elizabethchadwi ck.com



















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    • Anne Gilbert
      kathleen: I hope it does, too. It s true there have been a lot of rereleases lately, but there s new stuff as well. BTW, I m with you on this almost exclusive
      Message 60 of 60 , May 2 11:26 AM
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        kathleen:

        I hope it does, too. It's true there have been a lot of rereleases lately, but there's new stuff as well. BTW, I'm with you on this almost exclusive emphasis on Tudors. Puh-leeze. Let's get something else once in a while.
        Anne G





        --- In HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com, "Anne Gilbert" <avgilbert@...> wrote:
        > You may end up being pleasantly surprised. There seems to have been an "uptick" in the historical fiction market lately(though it tends to be mostly "Tudor-themed"). And just from my "conversations" with historical fiction and romance readers, yes, I think there is some overlap.

        Hi Anne,

        As I've been gearing up lately towards the release of my next book, I've noticed the category of 'historical fiction' seems to be increasingly found in review and award listings as well as other spots. It's so wonderful to be able to put a book in the right category for once instead of having to dump it under general or popular fiction where it gets lost. YAY!

        I'm wondering if the 'uptick' also has to do with so many re-releases of historicals that were well known back in the 1970's or so, like Philipa Gregory's. I remember my mother reading all of those. She also watched those old BBC Henry VIII and Elizabeth R series. Whatever the reason, I'm so thrilled to see a comeback. Let's hope for a big surge that not only covers the Tudors, but goes well beyond them to all periods!

        Cheers,
        Kathleen

        Kathleen Cunningham Guler
        The Macsen's Treasure Series
        Novels of 5th Century Britain
        Book 1: Into the Path of Gods
        Book 2: In the Shadow of Dragons (2002 CIPA Award)
        Book 3: The Anvil Stone (2006 CIPA Award;
        2007 Eric Hoffer Award; 2007 IPPY Award)
        Book 4: A Land Beyond Ravens (forthcoming 2009)
        http://kathleenguler.com
        http://kathleenguler.blogspot.com





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