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Re: English Civil War

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  • Pamela Cleaver
    An historical novelist whose work is out of print these days who dealt very factually with the ECW was Jane Lane. The Questing Beast deals with the run up to
    Message 1 of 15 , Jan 1, 2002
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      An historical novelist whose work is out of print these days who dealt very
      factually with the ECW was Jane Lane. The Questing Beast deals with the run
      up to the war concentrating on Pym, and A Call of Trumpets deals with the
      war itself doomed because of the feuding between Henrietta Maria and Prince
      Rupert. Rosemary Sutcliff's Rider of the White Horse is about Fairfax.

      Happy New Year,
      Pamela.

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    • katembuk
      -I m an ECW enthusiast and reenactor; I ve only just seen this thread, and would like to concur with the comments on the high quality of postings, especially
      Message 2 of 15 , Jan 15, 2002
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        -I'm an ECW enthusiast and reenactor; I've only just seen this thread,
        and would like to concur with the comments on the high quality of
        postings, especially those on Charles I. It's often implied today that
        the "divine right of kings" was his own idea, whereas in fact it was a
        commonplace in the 17th century that everyone had their God-given
        place in the hierarchy, with of course the king at the top.

        Barbara Hume asked whether it was currently considered correct to
        regard the Royalists as the good guys; quite the reverse, I should
        say. It was true in the 19th and early 20th centuries, but by the
        1950s left-wing writers began to portray the Parliamentarians as early
        fighters for their own cause (which the higher-ranking ones were
        certainly not!) My own view is that yes, of course with hindsight and
        modern sensibilities we can see that the changes brought about by the
        Civil War were necessary, but, as an Anglican with moderately
        pro-Establishment sympathies I think if I had lived then I would have
        supported the Royalists.

        I used to read Margaret Irwin during the "historical fiction boom" of
        the 1970s, but have not heard her mentioned for years. She was
        inclined to romanticise her leading characters, but her background
        detail was excellent. Another favourite of mine is Elizabeth Goudge's
        "The White Witch" (not much directly about the war, but a wonderful
        picture of life at the time). There's also "They were defeated" by
        Rose Macaulay, featuring Robert Herrick and other real people and
        written in 17th century English.

        Kate Bunting
      • Elizabeth Bentley
        ... I ve been interested lately, when reading an author of girls books in the early 20th century (E J Oxenham) in seeing how positive she was about John
        Message 3 of 15 , Jan 15, 2002
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          On 15/1/02 katembuk wrote:

          >
          >Barbara Hume asked whether it was currently considered correct to
          >regard the Royalists as the good guys; quite the reverse, I should
          >say. It was true in the 19th and early 20th centuries, but by the
          >1950s left-wing writers began to portray the Parliamentarians as early
          >fighters for their own cause (which the higher-ranking ones were
          >certainly not!) My own view is that yes, of course with hindsight and
          >modern sensibilities we can see that the changes brought about by the
          >Civil War were necessary, but, as an Anglican with moderately
          >pro-Establishment sympathies I think if I had lived then I would have
          >supported the Royalists.

          I've been interested lately, when reading an author of girls' books
          in the early 20th century (E J Oxenham) in seeing how positive she
          was about John Hampden, who resisted the ship-money tax of Charles 1.
          He was obviously one of her heroes. So it seems possible that
          Palrliamentarians were being viewed posutively much earlier than the
          50s.

          EB

          --
          Elizabeth Bentley
          elizabeth.a.bentley@...

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