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HNS York conference

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  • Anne Whitfield
    I ve been meaning to ask those who attended how was the HNS conference? Did everyone enjoy it? Has anyone written on their blog about the event and their
    Message 1 of 9 , May 1 1:54 PM
      I've been meaning to ask those who attended how was the HNS conference? Did everyone enjoy it? Has anyone written on their blog about the event and their thoughts?

      Regards, Anne.~
      http://www.annewhitfield.com
      Broken Hero out now! Check website for details.
      Her Shadowed Heart and Woodland Daughter released soon!


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Susan Hicks
      Hi Anne, ... I wasn t around at the conference much as a whole due to one thing and another, but from what I saw, everyone seemed to be enjoying the buzz and
      Message 2 of 9 , May 1 2:34 PM
        Hi Anne,

        Anne wrote:

        > I've been meaning to ask those who attended how was the HNS conference?
        > Did everyone enjoy it? Has anyone written on their blog about the event
        > and their thoughts?


        I wasn't around at the conference much as a whole due to one thing and
        another, but from what I saw, everyone seemed to be enjoying the buzz and
        talking shop like mad and it was good to catch up with many good friends in
        the HNS community.
        I've got the digital recording of my session with Alison King on the
        Akashic Record session from the York Conference transferred onto my PC. I'm
        going to get it typed up and put on my blog verbatim as soon as I've got a
        minute (hah!) As soon as I do, I'll notify the list. We had an excellent
        takeup response for holding a more relaxed and less time constrained follow
        up session involving use of the Akashic Records as a research tool and we
        hope to be holding a seminar for the interested parties once we've decided
        on a venue and organised a programme. I expect there will be reports either
        in the Review or Solander of the conference as a whole?

        Best
        Susan - who's blog currently stars the man who started her writing career!
        http://livingthehistoryelizabethchadwick.blogspot.com/
      • Eilidh
        I have not written anything on my blog yet – mostly because I m overcommitted... My comments would be: I loved York, perfect background for a HNS conference.
        Message 3 of 9 , May 5 6:22 AM
          I have not written anything on my blog yet – mostly because I'm overcommitted...

          My comments would be: I loved York, perfect background for a HNS conference. I liked the conference itself, listening to authors and the publisher was certainly a big plus.
          I enjoyed the workshops but I had wished for having not the choices that were offered. I had rather had the psychic as a workshop for those who are more receptive for this subject than I am. I'm not saying that what is attempted with a psychic trying to replace/add to scientific based research is not worth listening and considering, but I'm saying that I didn't care too much for it. I'd love to have a discussion around this subject, btw.
          I missed more practical advice about publishing, agenting and editing. It's nice to listen to authors, but I feel that half of the conference should be devoted to how to get HNS members published. A best practise sharing, do's and don'ts, offering of mentoring and help. Critique circles... so much to choose from.

          Summary: I’d go again and I’d recommend attendance to a friend.

          Ok, my three cents worth.


          Ilona



          ---- Anne Whitfield <annewhitfield@...> wrote:

          =============

          I've been meaning to ask those who attended how was the HNS conference? Did everyone enjoy it? Has anyone written on their blog about the event and their thoughts?

          Regards, Anne.~
          http://www.annewhitfield.com
          Broken Hero out now! Check website for details.
          Her Shadowed Heart and Woodland Daughter released soon!


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jeri Westerson
          ... This harks back to a discussion on one of my Sisters in Crime lists. Just what is it you expect from a conference and what is the purpose of particular
          Message 4 of 9 , May 5 9:23 AM
            On 5/5/08, Eilidh <eilidhgowan@...> wrote:
            >
            > > missed more practical advice about publishing, agenting and editing.
            > It's nice to listen to authors, but I feel that half of the conference
            > should be devoted to how to get HNS members published. A best practise
            > sharing, do's and don'ts, offering of mentoring and help. Critique
            > circles... <



            This harks back to a discussion on one of my Sisters in Crime lists. Just
            what is it you expect from a conference and what is the purpose of
            particular conferences? In the mystery genre, there are quite a few
            conferences to choose from. Many are devoted to fans and so they are full
            of author panels. Many are devoted to writers, and so they offer how-to
            panels and workshops, meetings with agents and editors, and opportunities
            for critique. They seldom overlap.

            I suppose for something like the Historical Novel Society, it might be worth
            having a fan track and a writer track, being that there isn't too much out
            there exclusively devoted to historical fiction and it is a fairly
            specialized genre. I've never been able to go to an HNS conference but I'd
            like to someday.

            The mission statement, far as I can tell, is this:

            *<The Historical Novel Society, *founded in 1997, promotes all aspects of
            historical fiction. We provide:

            - Support and opportunities for new writers,
            - Information for students, booksellers, and librarians,
            - A community for
            authors<http://www.historicalnovelsociety.org/member-websites.htm>,
            readers, agents, and publishers.>

            But I suppose one should ask what this means. In Sisters in Crime and
            Mystery Writers of America, members vote on bylaws and such, changing and
            growing what it is the membership needs. I don't think it is the same with
            this. Possibly it can be. Comments?

            Jeri

            --
            > "VEIL OF LIES; A Crispin Guest Medieval Noir"
            > (St. Martin's Minotaur, in bookstores October 28)
            > See my blog "Getting Medieval" http://www.jeriwesterson.typepad.com
            > or Crispin's blog http://www.CrispinGuest.com


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Susan Hicks
            ... Interesting point raised Jeri and gets to the heart of the dilemma. Earlier on in its life, from what I observed as a member and conference attendee, the
            Message 5 of 9 , May 5 9:58 AM
              Jeri wrote:
              >
              > This harks back to a discussion on one of my Sisters in Crime lists. Just
              > what is it you expect from a conference and what is the purpose of
              > particular conferences? In the mystery genre, there are quite a few
              > conferences to choose from. Many are devoted to fans and so they are full
              > of author panels. Many are devoted to writers, and so they offer how-to
              > panels and workshops, meetings with agents and editors, and opportunities
              > for critique. They seldom overlap.

              Interesting point raised Jeri and gets to the heart of the dilemma. Earlier
              on in its life, from what I observed as a member and conference attendee,
              the HNS seemed to have a balanced mix of readers and writers. Conference
              attendees were a healthy cross section of both and there was a strong
              interest in history and the authors (established authors that is) with less
              emphasis on how do I get published/find an agent, promote my novel etc etc.
              Probably more of a reader track as you've mentioned in your post. There has
              been a shift since those early days I think. Also the HNS in the early days
              was 99% British in its membership, and that too has changed. I would love
              to see the HNS returning to being a bit more reader orientated. I know I
              write historical fiction for a job, but I'm a reader of the genre too. If I
              want to talk historical fiction as a reader, I now use other forums. But
              yes, two tracks sounds good to me - although would probably give the
              organisers a massive headache!

              All best
              Susan
              >
            • P.D.R. Lindsay-Salmon
              Re the Conference. */Susan s comment: But yes, two tracks sounds good to me - although would probably give the organisers a massive headache! /* I d like to
              Message 6 of 9 , May 5 5:11 PM
                Re the Conference.

                */Susan's comment:
                But yes, two tracks sounds good to me - although would probably give the
                organisers a massive headache!
                /*
                I'd like to say it is possible.
                I've been involved with a few conferences now where two tracks are run,
                one for fans and readers the other for writers. We used the same
                timetable and conference for each track so that at 10 a.m., for example,
                the fans and readers listened to a reading and discussion and the
                writers discussed new trends with a publisher. The workshops were run
                the same way. People like the major guest writers usually delivered a
                speech for everyone, and the dinners, morning teas and other breaks are
                always at the same time so that people can meet and talk, another
                important part of a conference.

                It isn't that much of a headache if you have two groups organising, one
                for the readers and the other for the writers, although problems which
                could arise if the two organising groups don't meet and communicate.
                Patrika


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Alan Fisk
                I ve been involved with more than one conference of the Institute of Scientific and Technical Communicators, where there are always two and sometimes three
                Message 7 of 9 , May 6 1:11 AM
                  I've been involved with more than one conference of the Institute of Scientific and Technical Communicators, where there are always two and sometimes three streams.

                  We tried to organise the streams by theme: for example, an HNS conference could have one stream mainly aimed at writers and one at readers, although most of us spend a lot more time reading than we do writing.

                  The other vital point is that the facilitators must be ruthless about shutting down each presentation punctually, so that people have time to change to the other stream for the next presentation if they want to.

                  Alan

                  "P.D.R. Lindsay-Salmon" <thesalmons@...> wrote:
                  Re the Conference.

                  */Susan's comment:
                  But yes, two tracks sounds good to me - although would probably give the
                  organisers a massive headache!
                  /*
                  I'd like to say it is possible.
                  I've been involved with a few conferences now where two tracks are run,
                  one for fans and readers the other for writers. We used the same
                  timetable and conference for each track so that at 10 a.m., for example,
                  the fans and readers listened to a reading and discussion and the
                  writers discussed new trends with a publisher. The workshops were run
                  the same way. People like the major guest writers usually delivered a
                  speech for everyone, and the dinners, morning teas and other breaks are
                  always at the same time so that people can meet and talk, another
                  important part of a conference.

                  It isn't that much of a headache if you have two groups organising, one
                  for the readers and the other for the writers, although problems which
                  could arise if the two organising groups don't meet and communicate.
                  Patrika

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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                • Eilidh
                  In my full time job, I ve attended many conferences with scientific and technical background and I ve also organised smaller ones. It s kind of odd, but ithe
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 6 4:49 AM
                    In my full time job, I've attended many conferences with scientific and technical background and I've also organised smaller ones.

                    It's kind of odd, but ithe idea that readers and fans could also attend such a confernce (and even be the majority) only struck me reading all your responses - lol.
                    That explains the sale-nature of the event. See, here I thought the HNS is mainly an organisation to shape the future of the historical novel by helping established stay on track and aspiring writers get a foot in the door.

                    As nothing is wrong in attending the conference from a reader's perspective (one can always learn) I still enjoyed it and will enjoy future conferences.

                    Thanks

                    Ilona
                    ---- Alan Fisk <alanfisk@...> wrote:

                    =============
                    I've been involved with more than one conference of the Institute of Scientific and Technical Communicators, where there are always two and sometimes three streams.

                    We tried to organise the streams by theme: for example, an HNS conference could have one stream mainly aimed at writers and one at readers, although most of us spend a lot more time reading than we do writing.

                    The other vital point is that the facilitators must be ruthless about shutting down each presentation punctually, so that people have time to change to the other stream for the next presentation if they want to.

                    Alan

                    "P.D.R. Lindsay-Salmon" <thesalmons@...> wrote:
                    Re the Conference.

                    */Susan's comment:
                    But yes, two tracks sounds good to me - although would probably give the
                    organisers a massive headache!
                    /*
                    I'd like to say it is possible.
                    I've been involved with a few conferences now where two tracks are run,
                    one for fans and readers the other for writers. We used the same
                    timetable and conference for each track so that at 10 a.m., for example,
                    the fans and readers listened to a reading and discussion and the
                    writers discussed new trends with a publisher. The workshops were run
                    the same way. People like the major guest writers usually delivered a
                    speech for everyone, and the dinners, morning teas and other breaks are
                    always at the same time so that people can meet and talk, another
                    important part of a conference.

                    It isn't that much of a headache if you have two groups organising, one
                    for the readers and the other for the writers, although problems which
                    could arise if the two organising groups don't meet and communicate.
                    Patrika

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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                    Yahoo! For Good. Give and get cool things for free, reduce waste and help our planet. Plus find hidden Yahoo! treasure

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • kcguler
                    ... wrote: . ... run, ... example, ... are ... I d just like to say I agree here. One of the things that struck me when I attended the Salt
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 6 3:57 PM
                      --- In HistoricalNovelSociety@yahoogroups.com, "P.D.R. Lindsay-Salmon"
                      <thesalmons@...> wrote:
                      .
                      > I've been involved with a few conferences now where two tracks are
                      run,
                      > one for fans and readers the other for writers. We used the same
                      > timetable and conference for each track so that at 10 a.m., for
                      example,
                      > the fans and readers listened to a reading and discussion and the
                      > writers discussed new trends with a publisher. The workshops were run
                      > the same way. People like the major guest writers usually delivered a
                      > speech for everyone, and the dinners, morning teas and other breaks
                      are
                      > always at the same time so that people can meet and talk, another
                      > important part of a conference.

                      I'd just like to say I agree here. One of the things that struck me
                      when I attended the Salt Lake City conference was that the attendees
                      seemed to be overwhelmingly writers, but there were a few (very
                      enthusiastic) readers there as well. Interacting with them was one of
                      the best parts. I thoroughly enjoyed every other aspect of the
                      conference as well(and wish I would able to attend more of them) but it
                      feels on some accounts like preaching to the choir--as most of us are
                      already in the business to some degree or another. Don't get me wrong--
                      talking with other writers is more valuable than I can say, along with
                      learning from agents and editors. I just think it might be useful,
                      encouraging, enlightening, and so on to hear from readers as much as it
                      is from other writers, since they're the ones who buy the books that
                      keep us in this business. :-)

                      Just a thought,

                      Cheers,
                      Kathleen

                      --
                      Kathleen Cunningham Guler
                      The Macsen's Treasure Series
                      Novels of Arthurian Britain
                      Book 1: Into the Path of Gods
                      Book 2: In the Shadow of Dragons (2002 CIPA Award)
                      Book 3: The Anvil Stone (2006 CIPA Award;
                      2007 Eric Hoffer Award; 2007 IPPY Award)
                      http://kathleenguler.com
                      http://kathleenguler.blogspot.com
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