Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

selvages

Expand Messages
  • jewellboll
    Hello, My name is Jewell from wisconsin. I am blind with severe hearing loss. I was so glad to hear of this group and look forward to learning new techniques
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 14 7:41 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello,

      My name is Jewell from wisconsin. I am blind with severe hearing loss. I was so glad to hear of this group and look forward to learning new techniques and adaptive aids to make weaving a joy.

      For the last ten years I have spun my own yarns and had quite a collection of irregular yarnn. a friend graciously let me use her 4 shaft floor loom to weave two rugs to use up this yarn. It has been ten years since I did any weaving and really enjoyed the experience. I would like to ask the group for help regarding the selvages and reading pattersn.

      Are there special techniques to keep the selvages straight and uniform? And secondly, how do those of you who are blind read pattersn? I have brailled a simple twill patern on individual index cards and put them in a small binder to flip as I complete a shot. When I get to the end of the repeat, I flip the cards back to the beginning and start over. This also helps me keep my place in case of interruption. But I am ambitious and would like to tackle a more coplicated pattern. I have the book "The Key to weaving" and scanned into my computer some of the wonderful pattersn the book has. However, I do not have the vision to see the graft and my screen reader reads the graft as gibberish. I hope someone can offer some help in this area.

      Thank you for this list. I have searched long and hard to find other vision/blind weavers and I am glad I found you. Jewell
    • Kati Meek
      Welcome Jewell, And congratulations on your determination to find ways to weave. Do you have any vision? I ask because I wonder if you could enlarge a draft
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 15 8:10 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Welcome Jewell,
        And congratulations on your determination to find ways to weave.  Do you have any vision?  I ask because I wonder if you could enlarge a draft enough to be able to read it.  I am also thinking there should be a way to enlarge, then print a weave draft onto some material that would allow you to feel the ink.  Maybe someone on the list has experience with using different materials that might respond with a texture from the printing ink. If you print onto the clear sheets used in overhead projectors, can the ink be felt? Or maybe someone has developed an ink, like puff-ink used on t-shirts, that one could process somehow so it could be felt.  Have musicians developed any such techniques for vision impaired staff notation? 
         
        To help with the selvages I find an extra weight on the outside thread, sometimes a smaller weight on the next-to-outside warp, is invaluable.  The selvage threads are not forced into the mountains and valleys the way the inner warps are in their path over and under the weft, so are always getting looser.  I hang the weight - (a film can or Rx bottle with counted pennies give me control for precise adjustment) on a folded smooth yarn so it rides along under the back beam.  I also value the tension-adjustable end feed shuttle for helping my selvages.
         
        Treadle with Joy, Kati
      • Marg Coe
        Hi Jewell I m Margaret Coe, one of the helping hands and eyes, but certainly not ears! I too have a severe hearing loss, but I ve had it for so long and am
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 15 10:06 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Jewell

          I'm Margaret Coe, one of the helping hands and eyes, but certainly not
          ears! I too have a severe hearing loss, but I've had it for so long and
          am highly adaptive that some other weavers don't know it.

          What sort of loom are you using? You wrote regarding your cards with
          instructions in braille that you ". . . flip as I complete a shot."

          Are these cards to control the pattern for the threading or to keep
          track of the order in which you weave? On a treadle loom, depressing
          one treadle will raise the shafts for one shot. I realize you need to
          keep track of what sequence in which to depress the treadles, but
          otherwise I'm not sure I understand what you're writing unless you're
          using a lever loom or something that requires you to have information
          about each shot.

          If finances will allow, it might be good to investigate a dobby loom and
          preferably a computer-controlled dobby loom. Such a device would mean
          you don't need to keep track of shots at all, the dobby box or computer
          would do it for you.

          Finally, and here I'm stepping into territory with which I am familiar,
          but could know more, WIF files are text files of weaving drafts designed
          so that most of the different weaving programs can interpret them. I
          wonder if they would make more sense than a scanned draft for your
          screen reader.

          We could test it easily. That is, I could send you the text version WIF
          draft and tell you where the information starts (lots of stuff about
          color, thread thickness, etc., can be ignored). If the WIF draft isn't
          obvious, we could also rope in one of the program designers to tell us
          how to interpret the text. Does the screen reader allow you to easily
          open attachments?

          Welcome to the group, by the way.

          Marg

          _________________________________________
          Marg Coe, Tucson, AZ, USA
          http://www.coeproduced.com fiber arts
          Http://www.thewiredones.com web & graphic design
          http://blog.margaretcoe.com
          _________________________________________
        • Sue Mansfield
          Welcome Jewell, I m glad to hear that you want to continue weaving. I volunteer at the Blind Center in Washington, NC. Some of our clients have partial
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 15 1:15 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            Welcome Jewell,

            I'm glad to hear that you want to continue weaving. I volunteer at the
            Blind Center in Washington, NC. Some of our clients have partial
            vision. We generally weave plain weave on our four shaft table looms
            and one floor loom, but sometimes we do patterns. One of the table
            looms has plastic bumps on the front face of the levers to help the
            clients. Remembering the numbering sequence isn't too critical, but
            alternating the pairs of levers is, for plain weave. Similarly the
            treadles go in sequence from left to right. Sometimes I have used a
            walking treadling on the floor loom, but this becomes more difficult,
            especially when the client has orthopedic or wide shoes. (I have had
            them remove their shoes.) It didn't work well, so I stopped that way of
            treadling. They still treadle the left hand treadles with their left
            foot and the right hand ones with their right foot. Tabby treadles are
            the far left and right ones. If I can have a space between them and the
            pattern ones I do that.

            The other problem you mentioned was reading drafts. Your using index
            cards is a solution. I'm inferring from what you wrote that you have
            some vision left. Rewriting drafts with large numbers might help. You
            could also use different colored squares in the draft to distinguish the
            treadles, i.e. highlight or use colored pencil over the treadling
            numbers. I keep track of my place in the sequence with a straight pin
            in the card or paper. (Numbers are better than slash, x or O marks or
            black boxes in any part of the draft.) The microwave ovens at the Blind
            Center have a puffy orange paint on critical touch buttons; something
            like this coding your draft might work, too. Another person or sighted
            weaver could help you with this. My husband took a plastic clipboard
            and put a bracket on the back to hold it upright on the castle of any of
            my looms. I clip the draft to it so it's right in front of me at eye level.

            Marg's suggestion about getting .wif drafts is good to give you the
            added variety you want.
            http://www.handweaving.net//Home.aspx
            is a great source.

            Sue in eastern North Carolina
          • jewellboll
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 15 6:51 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In HelpingHandsandEyes@yahoogroups.com, Marg Coe <margcoe@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Jewell
              >
              > I'm Margaret Coe, one of the helping hands and eyes, but certainly not
              > ears! I too have a severe hearing loss, but I've had it for so long and
              > am highly adaptive that some other weavers don't know it.
              >
              > What sort of loom are you using? You wrote regarding your cards with
              > instructions in braille that you ". . . flip as I complete a shot."
              >
              > Are these cards to control the pattern for the threading or to keep
              > track of the order in which you weave? On a treadle loom, depressing
              > one treadle will raise the shafts for one shot. I realize you need to
              > keep track of what sequence in which to depress the treadles, but
              > otherwise I'm not sure I understand what you're writing unless you're
              > using a lever loom or something that requires you to have information
              > about each shot.
              >
              > If finances will allow, it might be good to investigate a dobby loom and
              > preferably a computer-controlled dobby loom. Such a device would mean
              > you don't need to keep track of shots at all, the dobby box or computer
              > would do it for you.
              >
              > Finally, and here I'm stepping into territory with which I am familiar,
              > but could know more, WIF files are text files of weaving drafts designed
              > so that most of the different weaving programs can interpret them. I
              > wonder if they would make more sense than a scanned draft for your
              > screen reader.
              >
              > We could test it easily. That is, I could send you the text version WIF
              > draft and tell you where the information starts (lots of stuff about
              > color, thread thickness, etc., can be ignored). If the WIF draft isn't
              > obvious, we could also rope in one of the program designers to tell us
              > how to interpret the text. Does the screen reader allow you to easily
              > open attachments?
              >
              > Welcome to the group, by the way.
              >
              > Marg
              >
              > _________________________________________
              > Marg Coe, Tucson, AZ, USA
              > http://www.coeproduced.com fiber arts
              > Http://www.thewiredones.com web & graphic design
              > http://blog.margaretcoe.com
              > _________________________________________
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.