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Haddonfield Shreds

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  • josephinepecorelli
    HELP!!!! I ve been to One Centennial Square, as have others, to shred my stuff and there is no shredder there. Commissioners: Where is the shredder today? Or
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 1, 2011
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      HELP!!!! I've been to One Centennial Square, as have others, to shred my stuff and there is no shredder there. Commissioners: Where is the shredder today? Or anyone else who knows - Where is the shredder?
      Thanks, Jo
    • Tish Colombi
      The shredding event is next Saturday, October 8, in the Archer Greiner parking lot. The Borough website has the date and time, October 8, 8:00 AM until noon,
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 1, 2011
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        The shredding event is next Saturday, October 8, in the Archer Greiner parking lot.  The Borough website has the date and time, October 8, 8:00 AM until noon,  on the front page of its website and I checked the Sun, who also has the date as October 8.  The date is also listed in the Borough Community Calendar that was delivered to every household the end of August.  See you next week!

        Tish Colombi

         

        From: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of josephinepecorelli
        Sent: Saturday, October 01, 2011 9:18 AM
        To: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [HaddonfieldTalks] Haddonfield Shreds

         

         

        HELP!!!! I've been to One Centennial Square, as have others, to shred my stuff and there is no shredder there. Commissioners: Where is the shredder today? Or anyone else who knows - Where is the shredder?
        Thanks, Jo

      • Bill Tourtellotte
        Jo, You can do it Old School . Just grab a big metal trash can from behind the building and use some matches. BT From: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 1, 2011
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          Jo,

          You can do it “Old School”. Just grab a big metal trash can from behind the building and use some matches.

           

          BT

           

           

          From: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of josephinepecorelli
          Sent: Saturday, October 01, 2011 9:18 AM
          To: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [HaddonfieldTalks] Haddonfield Shreds

           

           

          HELP!!!! I've been to One Centennial Square, as have others, to shred my stuff and there is no shredder there. Commissioners: Where is the shredder today? Or anyone else who knows - Where is the shredder?
          Thanks, Jo

        • Jo Pecorelli
          Great idea Bill but I don t have a big metal trash can. Thanks, Jo On 10/01/11, Bill Tourtellotte wrote: Jo, You can do it “Old School”.
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 1, 2011
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            Great idea Bill but I don't have a big metal trash can.  Thanks, Jo
             
             
            On 10/01/11, Bill Tourtellotte<wtourte@...> wrote:


            Jo,

            You can do it “Old School”. Just grab a big metal trash can from behind the building and use some matches.

             

            BT

             

             

            From: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of josephinepecorelli
            Sent: Saturday, October 01, 2011 9:18 AM
            To: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [HaddonfieldTalks] Haddonfield Shreds

             

             

            HELP!!!! I've been to One Centennial Square, as have others, to shred my stuff and there is no shredder there. Commissioners: Where is the shredder today? Or anyone else who knows - Where is the shredder?
            Thanks, Jo



          • Jo Pecorelli
            Haddonfield Online.com on their calendar has it listed for Oct 1st from 9-12 noon. The September 21st issue of the Sun has it listed as Oct 1st from 9-12 noon.
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 1, 2011
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              Haddonfield Online.com on their calendar has it listed for Oct 1st from 9-12 noon.  The September 21st issue of the Sun has it listed as Oct 1st from 9-12 noon.  See you next week!  Jo Pecorelli
               
               
              On 10/01/11, Tish Colombi<tishcolombi@...> wrote:


              The shredding event is next Saturday, October 8, in the Archer Greiner parking lot.  The Borough website has the date and time, October 8, 8:00 AM until noon,  on the front page of its website and I checked the Sun, who also has the date as October 8.  The date is also listed in the Borough Community Calendar that was delivered to every household the end of August.  See you next week!

              Tish Colombi

               

              From: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of josephinepecorelli
              Sent: Saturday, October 01, 2011 9:18 AM
              To: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [HaddonfieldTalks] Haddonfield Shreds

               

               

              HELP!!!! I've been to One Centennial Square, as have others, to shred my stuff and there is no shredder there. Commissioners: Where is the shredder today? Or anyone else who knows - Where is the shredder?
              Thanks, Jo



            • Bill Tourtellotte
              It sounds like it was correct on the Borough controlled sources and the papers may have gotten it wrong. Regardless, thanks to Tish for clarifying it for us
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 1, 2011
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                It sounds like it was correct on the Borough controlled sources and the papers may have gotten it wrong.

                 

                Regardless, thanks to Tish for clarifying it for us here!

                 

                Bill T

                 

                From: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jo Pecorelli
                Sent: Saturday, October 01, 2011 3:58 PM
                To: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: RE: [HaddonfieldTalks] Haddonfield Shreds

                 

                 

                Haddonfield Online.com on their calendar has it listed for Oct 1st from 9-12 noon.  The September 21st issue of the Sun has it listed as Oct 1st from 9-12 noon.  See you next week!  Jo Pecorelli

                 

                 

                On 10/01/11, Tish Colombi<tishcolombi@...> wrote:

                 

                The shredding event is next Saturday, October 8, in the Archer Greiner parking lot.  The Borough website has the date and time, October 8, 8:00 AM until noon,  on the front page of its website and I checked the Sun, who also has the date as October 8.  The date is also listed in the Borough Community Calendar that was delivered to every household the end of August.  See you next week!

                Tish Colombi

                 

                From: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of josephinepecorelli
                Sent: Saturday, October 01, 2011 9:18 AM
                To: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [HaddonfieldTalks] Haddonfield Shreds

                 

                 

                HELP!!!! I've been to One Centennial Square, as have others, to shred my stuff and there is no shredder there. Commissioners: Where is the shredder today? Or anyone else who knows - Where is the shredder?
                Thanks, Jo

                 

              • ILISE Feitshans
                Just to keep Haddonfield in the loop, as it is in my heart Missing the States, free food, free phones and freedom And hoping to see y all when I return to my
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 25, 2011
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                  Just to keep Haddonfield in the loop, as it is in my heart
                  Missing the States, free food, free phones and freedom
                  And hoping to see "y'all" when I return to my permanent residence in December 2011 -January 2012
                  all the best,
                  ilise

                  Invited Presentation for the Council of Europe

                  Nanotechnologies, A New Danger to the Environment?

                  Paris, September 16 2011

                   

                  “Forecasting Nano Law:  Defining Nano”

                  Ilise L Feitshans JD and ScM

                   

                  Geneva School of Diplomacy , Geneva Switzerland

                   "FORECASTING NANO LAW:  RISK MANAGEMENT PROTECTING PUBLIC HEALTH UNDER INTERNATIONAL LAW

                  Visiting Scientist, University of Lausanne ,  Institute for Work and Health

                  Lausanne Switzerland

                  ilise@...  Swisscom 41 79 836 3965  Ilise.Feitshans@...

                   

                  Nanotechnology’s  revolution for the global economy can  also revolutionize  public health!

                   

                  RESEARCH  Question

                  How can the benefits of nanotechnology be realized, while minimizing the risk of harm?

                   

                  POLICY RATIONALE:

                  Nanotechnology is already here in hundreds of consumer products: tennis balls, cars, refrigerators, cameras, cosmetics,

                  ££ euro.$ US GDP Predicted to be 3 trillion US dollars by 2015

                  Scientists and governments agree there are unknown risks and have begun drafting laws

                   

                  KEY ISSUES IN NANOTECHNOLOGY LAW AND POLICY

                  Risks associated with the application of new technologies are much slower to emerge than the many new vistas of prosperity and efficiency that nanotechnology promises to humanity throughout the world. The specter of new economic frontiers with wider horizons for new products and commerce that  nanotechnology brings has caused many opinion leaders in science, law and health policy to herald nanotechnology as an unprecedented opportunity for human development and growth. At the same time, the known dangers of many of the substances whose molecular structure are changed using nanotechnology has caused alarm among scientists and policymakers who fear that unfettered use of such new technologies can unleash a public health crisis.

                   

                  Law and science have partnered together in the recent past, to solve major public health issues, ranging from the asbestos threat to industry to averting the threat of nuclear holocaust. The issues raised by nanotechnology are new, but not as novel as they may at first seem. The notion of embracing new technology and regulating the development of  that new technology by regulating in face of risk was a recurring phenomenon in the twentieth century. Then, so called "big science" confronted risks from nuclear energy development, genetics, large scale agricultural revolution, and astrophysics, in order to bring new benefits to humanity.

                   

                  Work health and survival have been inextricably linked throughout the history of human civilizations.  Without work, society cannot survive, and no work can perpetuate society without health.  No society has survived without producing things; without work. We enjoy the fruits of many past civilizations today, as we draw upon their architecture such as the Pyramids, the Parthenon and the Great Wall. Philosophies and values embedded in ancient cultures can touch, even today, our daily lives. Indeed, the remnants that survive from ancient cultures are found in architecture, statues and pottery artifacts of the skilled crafts and creative labors of lost societies. None of these types of work: not the great monuments, not the writings or the arts-- could exist without a modicum of human health. Civilizations can be brought to a halt in times of plague and pestilence; and even the most impressive of collective efforts can be stopped  when injuries overtake any individual’s ability to work. Society therefore needs both: working people  and healthy people, in order for civilization to survive. When stakeholders form a critical mass of political will,  their societal efforts can succeed to get it right by  promoting the growth of new industries while minimizing the risk to the society at large. There are lessons to be learned from these precedents: significantly, scientists, lawyers, stakeholders and policymakers can work together to incubate new industries that surround the application of new technology, and with remarkably low risk to the population

                   

                  The Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, the Swiss National Science Foundation, the OECD and the USA 's National Institute of Occupational Safety and health (NIOSH) have surveyed the state of the art of nanotechnology and determined that the potential for risk exists, even though the precise nature and scope of risk within nanotechnology activities cannot be quantified at this time. These opinion leaders reflect a wide variety of opinions about the type of risk and how it can be prevented, but overall they do agree that precautionary approaches are necessary and that wise people will try to foresee inevitable but presently unknown nanotechnology risks. Then they will try to address these anticipated risks with best practices, codes of conduct and scientific principles to prevent harm that will reshape the rule of law.  Scientific precautionary principles protecting the human right to health exist  under international law  in the International Covenant of Social Cultural and Economic Rights (ICESCR) and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and international treaties, the WHO Constitution and many other documents.    

                   

                  II. Definitions.

                  1. To define or not define?

                  Arguments against defining engineered nanomaterials for regulatory purposes (Nature 475, 31;  July 2011).. In reply, also in NATURE, (August 29 2011, Herman Stamm wrote): But such a definition is urgently needed, especially for particulate nanomaterials… »

                   

                  2. How to define?  Le Monde page 11 uses: 100 nanometers  16  Sept 2011

                  A. Legislative Approaches:

                  List approach versus criteria: lists look easy but are a foe to progress! Things change, and the list stays the same, unless a committee of experts is convened with the power to change it.

                   

                  B. Sample Text for Definitions  that Might Become Law

                  The attempt to craft definitions is in an embryonic phase, and many experts meet to define the terms pertaining to nanoparticles and nanotechnology, but  few meetings have been convened in order to critique the definitions collectively using the text from a variety of sources. Yet, the potential sources are endless!  One government’s definition  offers that “Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications.”[1] There are several other definitions floating around the web, but they are awkward and have evoked much debate without clear scientific consensus [2].  A research center defines “Nanotechnology is the ability to measure, see, manipulate, and manufacture things usually between 1 and 100 nanometers. A nanometer is one billionth of a meter,  a human hair is roughly 100,000 nanometers wide”[3]

                   

                              Another definition views nanotechnology as “Encompassing nanoscale science, engineering, and technology, nanotechnology involves imaging, measuring, modeling, and manipulating matter at this length scale.”[4] A nanometer is one-billionth of a meter. A sheet of paper is about 100,000 nanometers thick; a single gold atom is about a third of a nanometer in diameter. Dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers are known as the nanoscale. Unusual physical, chemical, and biological properties can emerge in materials at the nanoscale. These properties may differ in important ways from the properties of bulk materials and single atoms or molecules.[5] And one regulatory model defines or "categorizes” chemical substances based on molecular identity, not on physical properties such as particle size, thereby arguing that their jurisdiction already exists to regulate nanomaterials.[6]

                   

                  Using scientifically accepted definitions from key reports such as the government of the United Kingdom, Switzerland or the multinational OECD,  when applying  a definition that might  include the broad and vague term, “atomic, molecular and macro molecular scales”  or “properties differ significantly from those at a larger scale” another problem soon becomes clear: such definitions can be meaningless without criteria.According to the Strategy set forth by the European Commission, “Originating from the Greek word meaning  “dwarf”, in science and technology the prefix nano signifies 10-9 ie. One billionth, One nanometer is one billionth of a meter… The  term nanotechnology (for the purposes of the EU strategy)  as a collective term, encompassing the various branches of nanosciences and nanotechnologies” [7]

                   

                  Although fascinating, it is not clear that one could apply the rest of the European Commission’s strategic definition to a specific place or operation in manufacturing as a matter of law:  “Conceptually, nanotechnology refers to science and technology at the nanoscale of atoms and molecules, and to the scientific principles and new properties that can be understood and mastered when[8] operating in this domain. Such properties can then be observed and exploited at the micro- or macro scale, for example, for the development of materials and devices with novel functions and performance”  If international regulatons were to apply this definition and the types of uses covered, there is hardly any operation of life that one could exclude from the coverage of laws under this definition.  Some of the definitions in respected references, such as the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution seem very straightforward at first instance, but would easily expand into unwanted areas of  industrial activity if applied in a workplace or to consumer products. For example, “Nanoscience”  is the study of phenomena and manipulation of materials at atomic, molecular and macro molecular scales where properties differ significantly from those at a larger scale.”  But in reality it is hard to posit a type of substance that does not differ significantly depending on its size, regardless whether inanimate or organic. 

                   

                              Applying this definition in a model framework therefore would include regulation of a wide variety of  substances and end products that may have nothing to do with the expected hazards posed by nanotechnology—thus  forcing many producers to comply with a law whose implementation makes no sense in their business or their workplaces.

                   

                              Overbroad legal terminology runs the risk of clogging the regulatory system with a litany of inventions and products that would distract regulators, compliance officers, inspectors and researchers from attacking the major emerging issues in nanotechnology’s applications.

                   

                  III. Conclusions Nanotechnology’s  revolution for the world’s economy can  also revolutionize public health!

                              RECOMMENDATION 1-  Possible  role for  the Council of Europe
                  Defining OR regulating nanotechnology in its 47 member states
                              *Plenty of laws exist already

                              GAPS in Two major  areas:

                              A.Harmonization and  B. Consumer Education

                   

                  RECOMMENDATION 2-- Possible role for Committee of Ministers

                  * Commission evaluating economic political scientific and legal aspects to determine-

                  should there be a Convention developed on a nanotechnology and human rights and the right to health   or possibly a Protocol to an existing Council of Europe Convention

                   

                  RECOMMENDATION 3-- Proposed Report regarding Nanotechnology

                  whether a Council of Europe-level recommendation (guidelines) or a binding legal instrument Definitions: which criteria to apply for defining nano

                  Precautionary principles as applied to emerging nanotechnologies

                   



                  [1] Nano.gov

                  [2] See proceedings of the conference  Second annual NanoImpactNet meeting sponsored by the EU , Council of Europe, Swiss assurance SUVA and  many additional private agencies and international organization, Lausanne Switzerland  march 9- 11  2010

                  [3]   Woodrow Wilson Center

                  [4] Nano.gov

                  [5] Nano.gov

                  [6]  REACH in the EU and TSCA are two examples of regulatory models that categorizes chemical substances based on molecular identity, not on physical properties such as particle size many nanomaterials are composed of chemical substances subject to TSCA. Nanomaterials based on chemical substances already on the TSCA Inventory are considered existing chemicals. Examples of nanomaterials based on existing chemicals are metals, such as but not limited to: iron, gold, and some metal oxides such as titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide. Nanomaterials that are not on the TSCA Inventory are considered new chemicals. Examples of nanomaterials that are new chemicals are carbon  nanotubes and fullerenes. New chemical substances are subject to reporting and review prior to commercialization. Nanomaterials based on existing chemical substances are not subject to reporting or review before commercialization.

                  [7]  European Commission TOWARDS A EUROPEAN STRATEGY FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY  Luxembourg Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 2004  page 4

                  [8]  European Commission TOWARDS A EUROPEAN STRATEGY FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY  Luxembourg Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 2004  page 4

                   



                  From: Tish Colombi <tishcolombi@...>
                  To: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sat, October 1, 2011 5:07:57 PM
                  Subject: RE: [HaddonfieldTalks] Haddonfield Shreds

                   

                  The shredding event is next Saturday, October 8, in the Archer Greiner parking lot.  The Borough website has the date and time, October 8, 8:00 AM until noon,  on the front page of its website and I checked the Sun, who also has the date as October 8.  The date is also listed in the Borough Community Calendar that was delivered to every household the end of August.  See you next week!

                  Tish Colombi

                   

                  From: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com [mailto:HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of josephinepecorelli
                  Sent: Saturday, October 01, 2011 9:18 AM
                  To: HaddonfieldTalks@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [HaddonfieldTalks] Haddonfield Shreds

                   

                   

                  HELP!!!! I've been to One Centennial Square, as have others, to shred my stuff and there is no shredder there. Commissioners: Where is the shredder today? Or anyone else who knows - Where is the shredder?
                  Thanks, Jo

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