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Re: [HTML-on-the-WEB] Mobile

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  • Thomas Hruska
    ... Even if you don t have a mobile phone, you can install the Android SDK (free) and it comes with an emulator, which is painfully slow, but it works. The
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 13, 2013
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      On 6/13/2013 5:57 PM, Scottish2 wrote:
      > Hi
      >
      > I am thinking of doing a website that will be for both normal computer
      > and mobile. It's mainly a directory so except for a small header image
      > the page will be all pretty much text/links
      >
      > Now as for me while I have a Cell it is just used for phone so for me I
      > have no way of testing the site on my own phone. But is there a
      > guideline as to size that would make it pretty much mobile compliant
      > that way when I get a friend to test it then it should pop right up no
      > issues being mainly text.
      >
      > Just asking so can hopefully save myself some headaches later!!
      >
      > Also are there any easy online guides for mobile programing tips and such?
      >
      > Thanks

      Even if you don't have a mobile phone, you can install the Android SDK
      (free) and it comes with an emulator, which is painfully slow, but it
      works. The default Browser the emulator comes with is pretty consistent
      with the actual target device (minus obvious hardware things like
      geolocation tracking that requires GPS hardware). It can give you a
      pretty accurate view of your website without needing real hardware.

      Follow three basic rules of thumb and you'll do fine:

      1) Think "vertical". If a user has to use "pinch-to-zoom" to view the
      site, then you are definitely doing it wrong - vertical scrolling only.
      This means no tables.

      2) If you set a "width" on any element, then you're probably doing it
      wrong unless you are really careful. The simplest approach is to make
      all elements fit the full width with rational margins and padding on a
      mobile device. However, make sure you have enough of a margin on the
      right from your content to accommodate the web view's scroll bar (0.7em
      is pretty good) or the auto-fading scroll bar will cover up content when
      scrolling, which looks weird. It is easier to just set a decent margin
      or padding around all the content and be done with it.

      3) Buttons and links should be bigger and spaced out more than on the
      desktop. The mouse pointer is a refined instrument. A touch screen
      involves mashing 1/30th of the screen per press.

      Too many business types think that just because they can see their
      website on a mobile device that their website is therefore "mobile
      friendly". They couldn't be more wrong - and usually violate all the
      rules of thumb above. I can view just about any website on my mobile
      devices, but that doesn't make those sites mobile friendly.

      What works on mobile usually works fine on the desktop too with some
      minor tweaks. The reverse is not usually true.

      Other tips that are more personal preference than "you have to do this"
      sort of stuff: Don't bother with "responsive" layouts (e.g. Twitter
      Bootstrap). Responsive is a hack to get existing sites to work on
      mobile devices (wrong approach). All the so-called "responsive" sites
      I've seen (and built) tend to have terrible performance in mobile/tablet
      settings and tend to break on simple stuff like forms. Start with a
      mobile first approach and then desktop will be a lot easier. I prefer
      the "different views of the same content served up differently" approach
      over the "responsive" approach. I also prefer client-controlled cookies
      to help the server decide which content to serve up and a mechanism
      (e.g. a hyperlink) to change the cookie and reload the page. Mobile
      users are different and have different needs than desktop but, IMO, all
      users should be able to access the same content if they want to and URLs
      should remain the same regardless of access method for SEO purposes.
      Nothing is more irritating to a mobile user than being unable to access
      the content they want to just because the site operator has put mobile
      users into a box.

      Note that webviews are less-responsive and feel sluggish compared to
      native apps. There's nothing you can do about that unless you want to
      write a set of native apps for the major mobile OSes out there. That's
      a LOT of work and not usually worth it.

      I've got several mobile devices and all sorts of dev tools I've
      accumulated over the past couple years. Once you've got something put
      together, I'd be happy to test it out and provide feedback.

      --
      Thomas Hruska
      CubicleSoft President

      I've got great, time saving software that you might find useful.

      http://cubiclesoft.com/
    • Scottish2
      Hi Thomas Sorry the delayed thanks was out most of yesterday. Thanks for all the tips on this will check out the emulator you suggested. I can always have some
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 15, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Thomas

        Sorry the delayed thanks was out most of yesterday. Thanks for all the
        tips on this will check out the emulator you suggested. I can always
        have some friends test it also once I have it close to where I want to
        make sure of other tips are compliant!

        Thanks again!


        On 6/13/2013 7:32 PM, Thomas Hruska wrote:
        >
        > On 6/13/2013 5:57 PM, Scottish2 wrote:
        > > Hi
        > >
        > > I am thinking of doing a website that will be for both normal computer
        > > and mobile. It's mainly a directory so except for a small header image
        > > the page will be all pretty much text/links
        > >
        > > Now as for me while I have a Cell it is just used for phone so for me I
        > > have no way of testing the site on my own phone. But is there a
        > > guideline as to size that would make it pretty much mobile compliant
        > > that way when I get a friend to test it then it should pop right up no
        > > issues being mainly text.
        > >
        > > Just asking so can hopefully save myself some headaches later!!
        > >
        > > Also are there any easy online guides for mobile programing tips and
        > such?
        > >
        > > Thanks
        >
        > Even if you don't have a mobile phone, you can install the Android SDK
        > (free) and it comes with an emulator, which is painfully slow, but it
        > works. The default Browser the emulator comes with is pretty consistent
        > with the actual target device (minus obvious hardware things like
        > geolocation tracking that requires GPS hardware). It can give you a
        > pretty accurate view of your website without needing real hardware.
        >
        > Follow three basic rules of thumb and you'll do fine:
        >
        > 1) Think "vertical". If a user has to use "pinch-to-zoom" to view the
        > site, then you are definitely doing it wrong - vertical scrolling only.
        > This means no tables.
        >
        > 2) If you set a "width" on any element, then you're probably doing it
        > wrong unless you are really careful. The simplest approach is to make
        > all elements fit the full width with rational margins and padding on a
        > mobile device. However, make sure you have enough of a margin on the
        > right from your content to accommodate the web view's scroll bar (0.7em
        > is pretty good) or the auto-fading scroll bar will cover up content when
        > scrolling, which looks weird. It is easier to just set a decent margin
        > or padding around all the content and be done with it.
        >
        > 3) Buttons and links should be bigger and spaced out more than on the
        > desktop. The mouse pointer is a refined instrument. A touch screen
        > involves mashing 1/30th of the screen per press.
        >
        > Too many business types think that just because they can see their
        > website on a mobile device that their website is therefore "mobile
        > friendly". They couldn't be more wrong - and usually violate all the
        > rules of thumb above. I can view just about any website on my mobile
        > devices, but that doesn't make those sites mobile friendly.
        >
        > What works on mobile usually works fine on the desktop too with some
        > minor tweaks. The reverse is not usually true.
        >
        > Other tips that are more personal preference than "you have to do this"
        > sort of stuff: Don't bother with "responsive" layouts (e.g. Twitter
        > Bootstrap). Responsive is a hack to get existing sites to work on
        > mobile devices (wrong approach). All the so-called "responsive" sites
        > I've seen (and built) tend to have terrible performance in mobile/tablet
        > settings and tend to break on simple stuff like forms. Start with a
        > mobile first approach and then desktop will be a lot easier. I prefer
        > the "different views of the same content served up differently" approach
        > over the "responsive" approach. I also prefer client-controlled cookies
        > to help the server decide which content to serve up and a mechanism
        > (e.g. a hyperlink) to change the cookie and reload the page. Mobile
        > users are different and have different needs than desktop but, IMO, all
        > users should be able to access the same content if they want to and URLs
        > should remain the same regardless of access method for SEO purposes.
        > Nothing is more irritating to a mobile user than being unable to access
        > the content they want to just because the site operator has put mobile
        > users into a box.
        >
        > Note that webviews are less-responsive and feel sluggish compared to
        > native apps. There's nothing you can do about that unless you want to
        > write a set of native apps for the major mobile OSes out there. That's
        > a LOT of work and not usually worth it.
        >
        > I've got several mobile devices and all sorts of dev tools I've
        > accumulated over the past couple years. Once you've got something put
        > together, I'd be happy to test it out and provide feedback.
        >
        > --
        > Thomas Hruska
        > CubicleSoft President
        >
        > I've got great, time saving software that you might find useful.
        >
        > http://cubiclesoft.com/
        >
        >



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