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Re: Domain host

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  • care_nurse
    I am finally getting back to this. I am wondering, Thomas, what hosting service you are using now and whether you are using the WP networking feature, or are
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 9, 2012
      I am finally getting back to this. I am wondering, Thomas, what hosting service you are using now and whether you are using the WP networking feature, or are you using a WP server farm?

      A couple people I know recommended Bluehost and they are also the top recommendation of Wordpress and also the most economical I found. I opened an account there shortly after posting here in March, hoping to set up the networking feature, but I think they are a WP server farm. I took advantage of the 1 month money back option and opted out. However I continue to hear people bragging on them and am thinking the dedicated server farm would be much easier and probably the best option for me.

      Would like to hear thoughts on this, and if anyone has used Bluehost with several WP url's what was your experience with it?

      Thanks,
      Lois

      --- In HTML-on-the-WEB@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Hruska <thruska@...> wrote:
      >
      > On 3/30/2012 11:20 AM, care_nurse wrote:
      > > Hi, I'm needing recommendations of hosting companies that allow multiple installations of Wordpress in sub-directories of a single, reasonably-priced domain, with full control over the WP installation. I prefer to install and manage by FTP rather than through the control panel of the server, but use phpMyAdmin if needed to manage the database. I am hoping to find these features at a reasonable price. I cannot afford a VPS account.
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > > Lois
      >
      > From personal experience in hair loss: WordPress is a CPU/RAM/resource
      > hog.
      >
      > Therefore: Shared hosting of WP is going to be an unpleasant
      > experience. Shared hosting performance is generally terrible anyway.
      > Been there, done that, hated it.
      >
      > If you want to run WP, you need beefy hardware backing it. There is no
      > way around the issue.
      >
      > You don't need multiple WP installs though for a single domain. You can
      > install one WP instance and enable the "Network" feature with the
      > "subdirectory" option. It takes a little more effort to set up but you
      > can manage hundreds/thousands of blogs on a single instance much more
      > easily.
      >
      > You best bet is to find a host that has a dedicated WP server farm where
      > they expect heavy WP usage. Because WP is such a resource hog, you can
      > get kicked off regular shared hosting very quickly. I know GoDaddy has
      > a dedicated WP server farm. They are okay and performance is decent
      > enough for a small site plus it looks like it scales out a bit.
      >
      > To simply start a single WP instance up (i.e. the PHP execution path),
      > you need approximately 30MB RAM (minimum) - if you install plugins, that
      > goes up fast - recommended minimum configuration for PHP alone is 64MB
      > RAM. 1and1.com shared hosting pricing starts at 60MB RAM per instance
      > and 10-15 concurrent connections. So even the simplest WP site is
      > likely going to struggle there. Rule of thumb: If you exceed shared
      > hosting limits too often, you get kicked off and/or throttled. With WP,
      > it is easy to exceed those limits on even a fairly low traffic site.
      > All of my web developer friends have this love/hate relationship with
      > WP. They hate it for its resource usage but love it for being able to
      > deploy a client website quickly.
      >
      > Another rule of thumb: Never, ever bundle hosting and domain. Get your
      > domain elsewhere. Lots of horror stories exist where people bundled
      > them together under one provider and then something happens and they
      > lost both the domain and the hosting. For domains, I like NameCheap.
      >
      > --
      > Thomas Hruska
      > CubicleSoft President
      >
      > Barebones CMS is a high-performance, open source content management
      > system for web developers operating in a team environment.
      >
      > An open source CubicleSoft initiative.
      > Your choice of a MIT or LGPL license.
      >
      > http://barebonescms.com/
      >
    • kemark9
      I had a WP blog on bluehost but only one. They were OK, but I ve had my main website and 5 blogs (4 WP and one Drupal each with their own domain) with my host
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 9, 2012
        I had a WP blog on bluehost but only one. They were OK, but I've had my main website and 5 blogs (4 WP and one Drupal each with their own domain) with my host of many years now and am VERY satisfied with their service ad performance. I've never had any bandwidth issues at all with them and the yearly fee is quite reasonable. They are also up pretty much 100% of the time, have kept their servers secure for me (my websites have never been hacked in the 15 years I've had a site located with them) and they are johnny-on-the-spot about helping me work out any issues I might be having.

        They have all the major blog platforms available in the scripts section for use as well as shopping carts, guest books and all manner of other lovely website add-ons you might want or need. MySQL database support, PHP5. Linux servers. Oh and their pricing structure is competitive and affordable.

        I've since closed down all but 2 of the blogs but one of those is a photography blog, so it has a lot of photos on it.

        Web HSP is their name and if you check them out, please tell them I recommended them.

        Margaret Norkett
        www.kemar-k9s.com

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Thomas Hruska
        ... Bluehost = [yuck, vomit!] I ve heard enough horror stories about them to know to stay far away from them for even non-WP sites. I personally know of one
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 9, 2012
          On 8/9/2012 11:56 AM, care_nurse wrote:
          > I am finally getting back to this. I am wondering, Thomas, what hosting service you are using now and whether you are using the WP networking feature, or are you using a WP server farm?
          >
          > A couple people I know recommended Bluehost and they are also the top recommendation of Wordpress and also the most economical I found. I opened an account there shortly after posting here in March, hoping to set up the networking feature, but I think they are a WP server farm. I took advantage of the 1 month money back option and opted out. However I continue to hear people bragging on them and am thinking the dedicated server farm would be much easier and probably the best option for me.
          >
          > Would like to hear thoughts on this, and if anyone has used Bluehost with several WP url's what was your experience with it?
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Lois

          Bluehost = [yuck, vomit!]

          I've heard enough horror stories about them to know to stay far away
          from them for even non-WP sites. I personally know of one WP site that
          managed to bring the entirety of Bluehost to its knees - they kicked the
          "offender" off. Shared hosting, across the board, is pure garbage, but
          Bluehost is worse. If you start doing anything particularly useful that
          bumps CPU, RAM, or bandwidth usage slightly, a shared host will kick you
          off ("unlimited" is a flat-out lie - it is unlimited until you pass the
          limits).

          My host is with 1&1 but I'm a dedicated server hosting customer and I
          only recommend dedicated hosting. There is nothing like it. I own all
          the CPU, RAM, and hard drive space on the box as well as get to manage
          the OS and installed software (got a LiMP install going right now). 1&1
          actually treats shared hosting and dedicated hosting customers
          completely differently. Support alone makes dedicated worth it: All I
          have to say is my account number, they see I've got a dedicated host,
          and I get transferred immediately to the U.S.-based support team whose
          sole job is to provide support for 1&1 dedicated hosting customers.

          I don't have any experience with their shared hosting but I've heard
          horror stories - not nearly as bad as Bluehost, but pretty bad.

          What I have NEVER heard of are any horror stories from people running
          dedicated hosts. I've heard a few VPS horror stories and more than my
          share of shared hosting stories. You get what you pay for.

          Plenty of people swear by Bluehost though. For starting out, it might
          be a fine platform. Just pray that you don't get any traffic to your
          website.


          > --- In HTML-on-the-WEB@yahoogroups.com, Thomas Hruska <thruska@...> wrote:
          >>
          >> On 3/30/2012 11:20 AM, care_nurse wrote:
          >>> Hi, I'm needing recommendations of hosting companies that allow multiple installations of Wordpress in sub-directories of a single, reasonably-priced domain, with full control over the WP installation. I prefer to install and manage by FTP rather than through the control panel of the server, but use phpMyAdmin if needed to manage the database. I am hoping to find these features at a reasonable price. I cannot afford a VPS account.
          >>>
          >>> Thanks,
          >>> Lois
          >>
          >> From personal experience in hair loss: WordPress is a CPU/RAM/resource
          >> hog.
          >>
          >> Therefore: Shared hosting of WP is going to be an unpleasant
          >> experience. Shared hosting performance is generally terrible anyway.
          >> Been there, done that, hated it.
          >>
          >> If you want to run WP, you need beefy hardware backing it. There is no
          >> way around the issue.
          >>
          >> You don't need multiple WP installs though for a single domain. You can
          >> install one WP instance and enable the "Network" feature with the
          >> "subdirectory" option. It takes a little more effort to set up but you
          >> can manage hundreds/thousands of blogs on a single instance much more
          >> easily.
          >>
          >> You best bet is to find a host that has a dedicated WP server farm where
          >> they expect heavy WP usage. Because WP is such a resource hog, you can
          >> get kicked off regular shared hosting very quickly. I know GoDaddy has
          >> a dedicated WP server farm. They are okay and performance is decent
          >> enough for a small site plus it looks like it scales out a bit.
          >>
          >> To simply start a single WP instance up (i.e. the PHP execution path),
          >> you need approximately 30MB RAM (minimum) - if you install plugins, that
          >> goes up fast - recommended minimum configuration for PHP alone is 64MB
          >> RAM. 1and1.com shared hosting pricing starts at 60MB RAM per instance
          >> and 10-15 concurrent connections. So even the simplest WP site is
          >> likely going to struggle there. Rule of thumb: If you exceed shared
          >> hosting limits too often, you get kicked off and/or throttled. With WP,
          >> it is easy to exceed those limits on even a fairly low traffic site.
          >> All of my web developer friends have this love/hate relationship with
          >> WP. They hate it for its resource usage but love it for being able to
          >> deploy a client website quickly.
          >>
          >> Another rule of thumb: Never, ever bundle hosting and domain. Get your
          >> domain elsewhere. Lots of horror stories exist where people bundled
          >> them together under one provider and then something happens and they
          >> lost both the domain and the hosting. For domains, I like NameCheap.
          >>
          >> --
          >> Thomas Hruska
          >> CubicleSoft President
          >>
          >> Barebones CMS is a high-performance, open source content management
          >> system for web developers operating in a team environment.
          >>
          >> An open source CubicleSoft initiative.
          >> Your choice of a MIT or LGPL license.
          >>
          >> http://barebonescms.com/

          --
          Thomas Hruska
          CubicleSoft President

          Barebones CMS is a high-performance, open source content management
          system for web developers operating in a team environment.

          An open source CubicleSoft initiative.
          Your choice of a MIT or LGPL license.

          http://barebonescms.com/
        • lists@flawebworks.com
          ... You do realize that your average joe internet user cannot run a dedicated server? Nor can they afford it? I ve run dedicated servers and while support was
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 10, 2012
            On 8/9/2012 10:35 PM, Thomas Hruska wrote:


            >
            > My host is with 1&1 but I'm a dedicated server hosting customer and I
            > only recommend dedicated hosting. There is nothing like it. I own all
            > the CPU, RAM, and hard drive space on the box as well as get to manage
            > the OS and installed software (got a LiMP install going right now). 1&1
            > actually treats shared hosting and dedicated hosting customers
            > completely differently. Support alone makes dedicated worth it: All I
            > have to say is my account number, they see I've got a dedicated host,
            > and I get transferred immediately to the U.S.-based support team whose
            > sole job is to provide support for 1&1 dedicated hosting customers.


            You do realize that your average joe internet user cannot run a
            dedicated server? Nor can they afford it?

            I've run dedicated servers and while support was ok, if I had a question
            about a firewall, a hack, or something along those lines I was on my own
            to fend for myself, or pay anywhere from $30 to 50 bucks an hour for
            them to fix it. They only supported hardware. Which, ironically I didn't
            have a problem with. I had to give up my dedicated server because I
            simply couldn't afford it anymore.

            So it's shared hosting for us peons and poor people.

            When I gave up dedicated hosting, I went to Hostgator. I've been there
            about 6 years and I've had to contact support twice, once was to ask a
            question. Never have any issues with them at all.

            Regards,

            Joann

            --
            http://technicalconfusion.com
            Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/techconfusion
            Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TechnicalConfusion
          • Thomas Hruska
            ... Interestingly, average Joe can apparently afford a smartphone with a data plan, cable/dish TV, and other expensive creature comforts. You could easily own
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 13, 2012
              On 8/10/2012 7:53 AM, lists@... wrote:
              > On 8/9/2012 10:35 PM, Thomas Hruska wrote:
              >
              >> My host is with 1&1 but I'm a dedicated server hosting customer and I
              >> only recommend dedicated hosting. There is nothing like it. I own all
              >> the CPU, RAM, and hard drive space on the box as well as get to manage
              >> the OS and installed software (got a LiMP install going right now). 1&1
              >> actually treats shared hosting and dedicated hosting customers
              >> completely differently. Support alone makes dedicated worth it: All I
              >> have to say is my account number, they see I've got a dedicated host,
              >> and I get transferred immediately to the U.S.-based support team whose
              >> sole job is to provide support for 1&1 dedicated hosting customers.
              >
              >
              > You do realize that your average joe internet user cannot run a
              > dedicated server? Nor can they afford it?

              Interestingly, average Joe can apparently afford a smartphone with a
              data plan, cable/dish TV, and other expensive creature comforts. You
              could easily own two dedicated servers for the monthly cost of cable TV
              alone. There aren't any good shows on TV anyway and why would you pay
              to watch commercials? Cable TV used to have ZERO commercials - the
              whole point of it was to be commercial-free TV.

              I call baloney on not being able to afford it. Get together with a
              group of friends who then all pitch in for and divide the cost of the
              dedicated host. It effectively becomes a shared host but then you know
              exactly who is on the system and you get all the benefits of a dedicated
              host without having to handle the burden of the cost by yourself.


              > I've run dedicated servers and while support was ok, if I had a question
              > about a firewall, a hack, or something along those lines I was on my own
              > to fend for myself, or pay anywhere from $30 to 50 bucks an hour for
              > them to fix it. They only supported hardware. Which, ironically I didn't
              > have a problem with. I had to give up my dedicated server because I
              > simply couldn't afford it anymore.

              Dedicated hosting has very clearly spelled out terms and conditions,
              hardware specs, and comes with a contract between you and the provider -
              including uptime guarantees. If the box goes down from their end, they
              have to credit your account for the downtime. You don't and won't ever
              get that from shared hosting. Dedicated solutions are geared for the
              business customer. Plus you are isolated from randomly being kicked off
              the service - unlike shared hosting.

              As a business owner, dedicated hosting allows me to remain worry-free
              from a hardware perspective - the most expensive part is box + bandwidth
              + electricity + backup generators + support + replacement hardware. I
              have to setup and maintain the software, but I don't mind that part. If
              you can't manage the box yourself, then pay someone you trust to do it
              for you or get a nerdy friend to do it for free - treat them to meals.
              If you don't know any nerdy friends, go find some. If you got hacked,
              that's your fault for not doing proper maintenance and firewall setup.


              > So it's shared hosting for us peons and poor people.

              When did I say "peons and poor people"? Shared hosting isn't a solution
              either. If you are doing this for fun, shared hosting works until
              people actually visit your website - then it becomes "not fun" real fast
              when the host kicks you off. You certainly can't run a real business on
              shared hosting - anyone who says otherwise is lying. All I know is that
              real hosting isn't cheap for some insane and likely inane reason.

              --
              Thomas Hruska
              CubicleSoft President

              Barebones CMS is a high-performance, open source content management
              system for web developers operating in a team environment.

              An open source CubicleSoft initiative.
              Your choice of a MIT or LGPL license.

              http://barebonescms.com/
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