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Re: [HOn3] Re: Harp switch stands.

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  • Jim Vail
    The harp switch stands were bent so they would clear the cylinders and/or plows on the K series locomotives when the target was thrown towards the track. Jim
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 18 11:01 AM
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      The harp switch stands were bent so they would clear the cylinders
      and/or plows on the K series locomotives when the target was thrown
      towards the track.

      Jim Vail
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      > You will see photos of them bent as the crews had to push so hard on
      > them to move the rails.
      >
      > Jerry Day
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      > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/HOn3/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJwb2l1dDQ5BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE0MTI3MwRncnBzcElkAzE3MDUwNjMxMDcEbXNnSWQDODI2MjQEc2VjA2Z0cgRzbGsDcnBseQRzdGltZQMxMzY2Mjk2NDU5?act=reply&messageNum=82624>
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    • bolsen187@frontier.com
      Thanks to all. The collective knowledge of this forum is always spot on and complete. Blayne
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 18 1:09 PM
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        Thanks to all. The collective knowledge of this forum is always spot on and complete. Blayne
      • Hart Corbett
        FWIW, my father photographed a harp switchstand being thrown for the mainline switch to a wye in May 1949. I was standing beside him at age 12 and we were
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 23 12:11 PM
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          FWIW, my father photographed a harp switchstand being thrown for the mainline switch to a wye in May 1949. I was standing beside him at age 12 and we were standing on the rear platform of standard gauge Virginia & Truckee RR combine no.18. The combine was being used as a caboose on the "Minden Mixed Train", a freight train which had just finished switching cars and then turning on the Minden, NV, wye and was about to head back to Carson City, NV. The man throwing the harp switch stand was named LaMessena (per my late friend Ted Wurm) and he was the conductor of the train. No one helped him with the harp.

          Dad's photo is a good one and clearly illustrates a harp switchstand in use. Apologies for using a photo from a standard gauge railroad!

          The photo is in the Photos section of this HOn3 List's website in an album titled Harp Switch Stand in Use. The direct link is:

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/HOn3/photos/album/5347337/pic/269573502/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc

          With best regards, Hart
        • John Stutz
          We use SPC (Central Pacific) style harp stands to throw 3 gauge stub switches at the Railroad Museum in Ardenwood Regional Park, Newark CA. If you are ever
          Message 4 of 12 , Apr 23 12:55 PM
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            We use SPC (Central Pacific) style harp stands to throw 3' gauge stub switches
            at the Railroad Museum in Ardenwood Regional Park, Newark CA. If you are ever
            in the area, come out and look them over. The park is open year round, normally
            10:00AM-4:00PM, but closed on Mondays. If you ask the train crew, they may let
            you try throwing one.

            The real problem is with the stub switches. Rails expand under the hot sun, and
            if clearances are small when cold, they may jam in the head blocks. Rails may
            also walk over time, closing the clearances. When a rail jams, it can take a
            large man's full weight, hanging from the mast with feet on the stand, to shift
            the swing rails. I've done it often enough, usually during our Fall Rail Fair
            when we had to keep traffic moving while working on the switch.

            I suspect that a geared rotary stand gives greater leverage, and that when
            throwing it one is pushing against the ground, with greater force than can be
            had by hanging from a harp stand's mast.

            John Stutz
          • Tom
            We have a 3-way stub switch (std gauge)and harp stand at CA State RR Museum in Sacramento. It is on tracks leading from CPPS (used for equipment storeage).
            Message 5 of 12 , Apr 24 5:08 PM
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              We have a 3-way stub switch (std gauge)and harp stand at CA State RR Museum in Sacramento. It is on tracks leading from CPPS (used for equipment storeage). This switch has to be used many times during a week (guess 200-300+ times per year). No problems with a single person operating it with the exception of VERY hot days (temps in 100 F range) - as John described expansion can bind things up!
              Tom Peterman

              --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, John Stutz <John.C.Stutz@...> wrote:
              >
              > We use SPC (Central Pacific) style harp stands to throw 3' gauge stub switches
              > at the Railroad Museum in Ardenwood Regional Park, Newark CA. If you are ever
              > in the area, come out and look them over. The park is open year round, normally
              > 10:00AM-4:00PM, but closed on Mondays. If you ask the train crew, they may let
              > you try throwing one.
              >
              > The real problem is with the stub switches. Rails expand under the hot sun, and
              > if clearances are small when cold, they may jam in the head blocks. Rails may
              > also walk over time, closing the clearances. When a rail jams, it can take a
              > large man's full weight, hanging from the mast with feet on the stand, to shift
              > the swing rails. >
              > John Stutz
              >
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