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Re: Brick Manufacturing

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  • bolsen187@frontier.com
    I think you should keep your mineral engineers on the look out for veins of silly putty which would greatly increase your revenue and your freight traffic. I
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 15, 2013
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      I think you should keep your mineral engineers on the look out for veins of silly putty which would greatly increase your revenue and your freight traffic. I was getting ready to tear up my combination shaft because of the terrible water problem when when I discovered, based on a suggestion I received on this forum, that our mine was being flooded by mineral water. Pumping has begun and a pilot plant is under construction to bottle the water. Life is good. Track is being laid. Blayne
    • John Stutz
      ... The requirements for a brickworks are access to clay and coal or other fuel as inputs, and high capacity transportation for moving the product. One of
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 15, 2013
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        On 04/14/2013 04:27 PM, Jacob wrote:
        > Hello All;
        > I live near a historical clay mine and remnants of a beehive shaped oven. I have
        > been trying to find a resource to research how clay was harvested and made into
        > brick in the 1870's. I am considering modeling a clay mine in one portion of the
        > layout and then transporting the clay to a brick company for manufacturing at
        > another portion of the layout. Would they have used trains for this or would it
        > strictly be transported by horse/wagons?

        The requirements for a brickworks are access to clay and coal or other fuel as
        inputs, and high capacity transportation for moving the product. One of these
        will be critical, and early on works were sometimes sited at the point of use.

        The Catskill example of a previous reply show how outbound transport could
        determine plant siting, with both clay and coal brought in. I suspect they got
        their coal on the same barges that carried their bricks out.

        EBT served extensive brick works located at Mt Union, close to clay and SG
        transport for products, with coal fines cheaply available from the EBT coal
        washing plant or off of the PRR. The EBT books may have something on the plant
        and pit transportation facilities. These were specialist plants, producing
        refractory brick for the iron & steel industry, using ganister rock mined along
        the EBT. But I believe that the clay pits were local to the Mt Union area.

        Where plants were sited near the clay pits, 18-36" gauge industrial railroads
        dominated clay transportation. Early examples were horse drawn, using the rails
        to provide an all weather road. By 1900 there was a lively market in small tank
        engines for powering these, typically 0-4-0t in the 4-10 ton range. Later on
        small gas-mechanical engines dominated. There is a Porter catalogue reprint of
        circa 1910 available, and an NMRA sponsored Porter history, both of which
        illustrate these small engines. I expect there are others. There are some
        Plymouth catalogue reprints available, at least one of which illustrates use of
        their engines in many industrial settings, including clay pits. Other builders
        may have similar catalogs.

        Likewise, there was a market for small scale excavators in clay pits, and the
        manufacturers' catalogs occasionally illustrate such use. Darryl Huffman
        <http://ghosttownmodels.com> offers several such as CDs, but I cannot now recall
        which ones show clay pit operations. Another source for such catalogs is
        <http://www.vintageliterature.ca/cat_railroading.cfm>

        The Erie B-2 steam shovel (1920's) kits offered in HO by Jorden and Rio Grande,
        and Rio Grand's dragline version might be a good match for a medium size clay
        mine, while Rio Grand's Marion Model 40 RR shovel would be suitable for a large
        one. The Eries could be bashed for a gas/diesel version. Rio Grand's AH&D
        ditcher variants could be combined with a tracked chassis, as I believe appears
        in AH&D catalogs. There are also diesel versions not much larger than the Erie:
        OO scale Ruston Bucyrus 19-B(1937-1955) and 22-RB(1950+) kits by Langley Models
        in England. These are pewter kits, provided in two parts: the chassis and house
        in one, and several alternative working ends in the second, usually sold as a
        package. The scale difference increases the size by 1/7, and volume by 1/2,

        John Stutz
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