Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [HOn3] Ash Pit

Expand Messages
  • John Stutz
    ... Fire cleaning was a constant problem with coal burning locomotives, and especially so with coals that tend to clinker and plug the air flow. Engine
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 20, 2013
      On 03/19/2013 07:50 PM, Jerry Day wrote:
      > The D&RGW cinder-ash pits in the smaller terminals were normally shoveled by
      > hand into gondola on depressed tracks. This was true of both narrow gauge and
      > standard gauge terminals.
      > .....
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/HOn3/photos/album/1962106790/pic/list
      >
      > I have attached photos of the Durango, Gunnison, Chama, and Salida pits. Note
      > the shovel on the side of the drop bottom gon at Chama.

      Fire cleaning was a constant problem with coal burning locomotives, and
      especially so with coals that tend to clinker and plug the air flow. Engine
      terminal servicing always required fire cleaning, hence the ubiquitous terminal
      ash pits, but fire cleaning could be required after any stretch of hard
      steaming. It might be informative to inquire how the Silverton and the Cumbres
      and Toltec handle the problem. Can a locomotive get to Silverton and back
      without cleaning the fire? I doubt it, but don't know where or how they do it.
      Does anyone know?

      As an example of a consequence of frequent fire cleaning away from terminals:
      The Chile Line grade south of Taos Junction is now used by Forrest Road 652.
      Barranca hill, north from Embudo to the canyon rim, required very heavy
      steaming. Barranca station was about a half mile north of the rim. There is
      nothing there now but the almost invisible trace of a wye, but the site is still
      well marked by the gray ash mixed into the road surface, which everywhere else
      is the natural earthen tan. Might be a detail worth modeling.

      John Stutz
    • Dunlevy, Bruce
      John, In 2007, the D&S installed a new ash pit in Silverton. See: http://www.flickr.com/photos/53177163@N00/483335567/in/photostream/ for pictures. Bruce
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 20, 2013
        John,

        In 2007, the D&S installed a new ash pit in Silverton. See:

        http://www.flickr.com/photos/53177163@N00/483335567/in/photostream/

        for pictures.

        Bruce Dunlevy
      • hwcwsl
        Jerry, I just checked my B&W photos of the Alamosa Yards from early April 1962. Quite a few photos but I did not get the ash pit setup, not even in the
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 20, 2013
          Jerry, I just checked my B&W photos of the Alamosa Yards from early April 1962. Quite a few photos but I did not get the ash pit setup, not even in the background of any of the photos.

          With best regards, Hart
          ______________________________________________

          --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry Day" <jerry474@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, Barry Hopwood <blhopwood@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Jerry,
          > >  
          > >   Any idea whether the ash pit at Alamosa had an electric conveyor of any kind or was it manual labor?
          > >  
          > >    Thanks.
          > >  
          > > Barry Hopwood
          > > Allen, Tx
          > >
          > Earlier it had two manual pits...one narrow gauge and one standard gauge. I do not know what it had later. As the largest D&RGW standard gauge power (3600 2-8-8-2s) were used there, I am assuming it was a powered system. I have no photos of it.
          >
          > Jerry Day
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.