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Re: [HOn3] Re: Durango Iron Works

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  • Mike Conder
    Note that this building was also known as the Telluride Iron Works at one time. One of the recent narrow gauge calendars (maybe 4-5 years ago?) had a corner of
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 3, 2012
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      Note that this building was also known as the Telluride Iron Works at one time.


      One of the recent narrow gauge calendars (maybe 4-5 years ago?) had a corner of the building in a loco shop.  It is a light tan rock color, with dark red or brown window trim.  At least, that's what it looked like when it was published; take it with a lottle grain of salt (remember the green boiler discussions as nausem?).  But there are still a few buildings in Durango that are built with a similar stone; their size, shape and apparent color is identical to the building.  One of the buildings is a 1 story garage about 6 blocks north of the depot, between 11th and 12th Streets, on Narrow Gauge Avenue (east side of the track to Silverton).

       
      Mike Conder

      Mark K wrote:


      Yes. Here is a link I posted a week or so back when we were discussing a future Downtowm Deco project. Sadly i do not think it will happen.
      >
      >http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/80472/rec/293
      >

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • 23weldon
      Reference to Mike Condor s comment about the stone construction of the old Durango Iron Works: But there are still a few buildings in Durango that are built
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 11, 2012
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        Reference to Mike Condor's comment about the stone construction of the old Durango Iron Works:
        "But there are still a few buildings in Durango that are built with a similar stone; their size, shape and apparent color is identical to the building. One of the buildings is a 1 story garage about 6 blocks north of the depot, between 11th and 12th Streets, on Narrow Gauge Avenue (east side of the track to Silverton)." ....... Mike Condor

        Mike -- I found the referenced building on Google Earth and there are good GE street views of the front and sides. Do you have any other specific or probable locations I could view on that source? I know I'm getting pretty deep into details but I think this is useful research that might open a little forgotten window into the history of the town. And to my own interest in creating a model of the structure.
        The old archive picture has good enough resolution to show two slightly different methods of stone construction in the Iron Works building. The wall on the south side of the machine shop end shows the same rough stone construction at the office end as the south wall of the foundry. But the best resolution I can access is not clear enough to be a basis for credible model work. However, there is a section of that machine shop wall behind the coal bin that clearly shows rectangular random stone blocks very similar to the building on Narrow Gauge Avenue (your quote above). This section (with different windows) appears to have been built at a different time. (I suspect when a new machine wouldn't fit through the machine shop door)
        BTW the "15 hp rattler" (wording on the Sanborn image) sounds like a big foundry machine used for tumbling castings and testing the hardness of construction bricks.
        I'm hoping there is another survivor building in the Durango area that has the same construction as the indistinct walls of the Iron Works and is on one of the GE street views. Or can anyone shed light on the building stone cutting methods that might have produced the blocks for those early walls. This is a subject that is fairly remote to me.
        Ed Weldon




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      • John Stutz
        ... Ashler masonry refers to mortared stone masonry work done with fairly uniform blocks. In coursed Ashler the layers are uniform the width of a wall.
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 11, 2012
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          On 10/11/2012 12:53 PM, Ed Weldon wrote:
          > Reference to Mike Condor's comment about the stone construction of the old
          > Durango Iron Works:
          > "But there are still a few buildings in Durango that are built with a similar
          > stone; their size, shape and apparent color is identical to the building. One of
          > the buildings is a 1 story garage about 6 blocks north of the depot, between
          > 11th and 12th Streets, on Narrow Gauge Avenue (east side of the track to
          > Silverton)." ....... Mike Condor
          >
          > ....
          > I'm hoping there is another survivor building in the Durango area that has the
          > same construction as the indistinct walls of the Iron Works and is on one of the
          > GE street views. Or can anyone shed light on the building stone cutting methods
          > that might have produced the blocks for those early walls. This is a subject
          > that is fairly remote to me.

          "Ashler masonry" refers to mortared stone masonry work done with fairly uniform
          blocks. In "coursed Ashler" the layers are uniform the width of a wall. In
          "random Ashler" the blocks are of semi-random thickness, but this requires
          several thicknesses that match to the extent that combinations of the smaller
          ones add up to the larger ones, while allowing for joints.

          The stone is normally sedimentary, typically sandstone or limestone, which was
          laid down in beds that allow easy splitting along parallel bedding planes. Some
          other rock types occasionally show similar bedding. This is the source of the
          uniform thickness of individual stones, and the limited range of thicknesses
          found in any one structure. Large slabs split from the beds are cut to a size
          suitable for handling, by drilling rows of holes and driving in wedges. Block
          sizes for smaller structures will be what one or two men can handle. For larger
          structures, like bridge piers, the blocks are handled with derricks and can be
          much larger.

          Specifications usually require that blocks not touch one another, but are
          separated by a layer sand/cement mortar that distributes the loads over a tight
          waterproof joint. The bedding planes' flatness usually allows inter-layer
          joints to kept to 1" or so. Vertical face joints are usually required to match
          this, but vertical interior joints may be much larger, and filled out with
          fragments and chips generated while fitting the face joints. This only shows in
          a broken structure. Face surfaces are squared to a plane surface along the
          edges only, by sawing a grove about 1" deep, and splitting off the excess. The
          resulting edges provide the alignment for assembly, with actual faces normally
          projecting slightly beyond the reference surface.

          This is pretty much from my own observation and my reading in old engineering
          and construction publications. I expect that Wikipedia can provide far more
          than you want to know about the subject.

          John Stutz
        • Ed
          Thanks, John. Good short course with helpful search words. Looks like the foundry building is Ashlar style masonry with a quarry face . The difference in
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 11, 2012
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            Thanks, John. Good short course with helpful search words. Looks like the foundry building is Ashlar style masonry with a "quarry face". The difference in appearance seems to be a matter of the size of the rectangular blocks and the amount of working of the faces. Kind of a difference in quality of quarry work the majority of the original building being of a less expensive grade of stone, generally smaller in size and requiring additional mason labor to erect. Some adjusting of contrast on the c1900 image at hand begins to show joints of the blocks hidden within the coarser surface of the machine shop office wall. This looks like a real challenge to model. Some study of plaster carving techniques appears to face me. Perhaps some experimentation with laser etching the surface of a casting master will lead to a good answer.
            Ed Weldon

            --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, John Stutz <John.C.Stutz@...> wrote:
            > "Ashler masonry" refers to mortared stone masonry work done with fairly uniform blocks. In "coursed Ashler" the layers are uniform the width of a wall. In "random Ashler" the blocks are of semi-random thickness, but this requires several thicknesses that match to the extent that combinations of the smaller ones add up to the larger ones, while allowing for joints..........
            > John Stutz
          • John Stutz
            Ed For modeling Ashler masonry, an extremely realistic method is to use hydrocal cast in thin sheets, then scored and broken into strips and blocks, to make
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 11, 2012
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              Ed

              For modeling Ashler masonry, an extremely realistic method is to use hydrocal
              cast in thin sheets, then scored and broken into strips and blocks, to make
              individual stones that are assembled in prototypical fashion. The technique was
              described by Jack Work in one of his last articles, published in the premier
              issue of Mainline Modeler about 30 years ago. I believe that C.C.Crow offers
              wall sections cast from masters built using Work's technique. If so, that will
              be your best approach to modeling this type of building. Crow's website also
              offers some excellent discussion of plaster modeling techniques, particularly on
              how to add windows and doors to his wall sections.

              If you do build one, please pay attention to how real masons interlock their
              corners to bind walls together in mutual support. Some of the "masonry" models
              illustrated in recent publications omit this aspect, giving the impression of
              modern fake stone veneer applied over wooden framing.

              John

              On 10/11/2012 05:53 PM, Ed wrote:
              > Thanks, John. Good short course with helpful search words. Looks like the
              > foundry building is Ashlar style masonry with a "quarry face". The difference in
              > appearance seems to be a matter of the size of the rectangular blocks and the
              > amount of working of the faces. Kind of a difference in quality of quarry work
              > the majority of the original building being of a less expensive grade of stone,
              > generally smaller in size and requiring additional mason labor to erect. Some
              > adjusting of contrast on the c1900 image at hand begins to show joints of the
              > blocks hidden within the coarser surface of the machine shop office wall. This
              > looks like a real challenge to model. Some study of plaster carving techniques
              > appears to face me. Perhaps some experimentation with laser etching the surface
              > of a casting master will lead to a good answer.
              > Ed Weldon
              >
              > --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com <mailto:HOn3%40yahoogroups.com>, John Stutz
              > <John.C.Stutz@...> wrote:
              > > "Ashler masonry" refers to mortared stone masonry work done with fairly
              > uniform blocks. In "coursed Ashler" the layers are uniform the width of a wall.
              > In "random Ashler" the blocks are of semi-random thickness, but this requires
              > several thicknesses that match to the extent that combinations of the smaller
              > ones add up to the larger ones, while allowing for joints..........
              > > John Stutz
              >
              >
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