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Re: Colorado Narrow Gauge Color Slides from 1975

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  • Ivan Abrams
    My suggestion would be to have them scanned professionally, and then post them to a photo-sharing site like Flickr, www.Flickr.com Flickr is a Yahoo website.
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 29, 2012
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      My suggestion would be to have them scanned professionally, and then post
      them to a photo-sharing site like Flickr, www.Flickr.com

      Flickr is a Yahoo website. You'll need to sign up for an account. The basic
      account is free, but that limits the number of images you can have online.
      The "pro" account is $25/year, with unlimited posting and storage of images.

      After you've posted the pix to a site, you can share your Flickr ID with
      the group and we can view them.

      There's a bit of a learning curve to Flickr, and the site is about to
      update its interface. You'll have a choice of whether you want viewers to
      be able to download the images, whether you'll permit them to be used
      and/or reproduced. You can restrict viewing--though I hope you won't--to
      your contacts, friends, or family. You can download full-size image files,
      which means that viewers can see all the detail in the photos.

      Ivan Abrams


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Don Bergman
      George, What luck! The very first thing I would do is get a high quality scanner and digitally scan the slides into Photoshop. Do not save the original scans
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 1, 2012
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        George,

        What luck!

        The very first thing I would do is get a high quality scanner and digitally scan the slides into Photoshop. Do not save the original scans as any compressed file. Make backups. If the color has deteriorated any you can sometimes revive them.

        Once saved in this manner then....Try to find out if the slides are copyrighted. Several sources, especially Al Chione make a lot of color slides from the late 1930's on available over the past several decades. Slides by Richard Kindig, Richard Jackson and others. These slides were sold in sets. Are there any markings on the slides? Are they original slides or copies? If original then less likely they are copyrighted.

        Do you have any idea who took the slides. How many slides? The history of the slides? Do you have any documentation dating the slides, location, photographer? (There are many folks out here who can assist in documentation.) Is the date on the slides? Any idea how far back they go? Or are they all taken from around 1975?

        If Copyrighted then you cannot distribute them. If not, then once scanned they can easily be placed on a DVD and sold at a fee to cover your costs and time.

        I have scanned about 750 slides (and thousands of family ones), that I have on the RGS unfortunately these are copyrighted so if anyone would like to see them you have to pay me a visit! :-)

        Most likely there are lots of us out here who would like to see them? Much more interest if they date back to the era when the narrow gauge was still in operation.

        Feel free to contact me off line with questions on scanning. DBRenegade at Hotmail.com

        Don Bergman
        Holland, MI



        >
        > Question: How should I make sure the greatest number of narrow gauge enthusiasts have an opportunity to see them?
        >
        > George
        > in SLO, CA
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Hart Corbett
        All: What Don describes is exactly what I have done with my personal slides and photos which I took of the West Side Lumber Co. (53 Kodachrome slides) in May
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 2, 2012
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          All:

          What Don describes is exactly what I have done with my personal slides and photos which I took of the West Side Lumber Co. (53 Kodachrome slides) in May and June 1959 and of the D&RGW Durango Yards as they were in July 1960 (34 slides). Within the next 30 days, I'll be doing the same thing with about 80 color slides which I took in January 1960 of the Southern Pacific Narrow Gauge in the Owens Valley, CA, while it still was operating.

          I scan them with my Epson "Perfection V700 Photo" scanner which I've had for 3 years, run them through PhotoShop on my iMac, and then post them to Picasa, the free internet service which is run by Google. I then take the internet link for that particular photo album and post it in the "Links" section of the website home page of a number of Yahoo Group Lists and also post a message to as many Lists as you wish that the photos are available. I also provide the link in that message so anyone reading it can just click on the link and see the photos immediately. Simple and fun to do! Brings back memories for me.

          Some examples to demonstrate:

          (1) For the West Side photos, I had a story to tell, so in 2009 I used several Adobe Acrobat .pdf documents that appear in the "Files" section of the West Side List. They also appear on a website run by a friend called "PacificNG.com". The direct link to my .pdf documents on this second website is:

          http://www.pacificng.com/template.php?page=roads/ca/wslco/requiem/index.htm

          Note how I separate the URL (the link) by hitting the Return key twice and twice again after posting it. Helps to set the URL clearly apart from any message text.

          (2) For the D&RGW Durango Yards, I used Picasa. In this case, I just used the introduction section of the Album to give background and then let the captions for each photo tell the rest of the story. The direct link to my Picasa album of photos on this subject is:

          https://picasaweb.google.com/111099367172613506788/DRGWDURANGOYARDJULY1960

          This link also is published in the "Links" section of this HOn3 Group List. I did it a year or two ago. There, just click on the title.

          If you don't need a lot of captions or a long introduction, it's even easier to publish photos this way (I tend to get verbose especially about photos which I took over half a century ago).

          There are other free web services that also can be used for the same thing. I just happen to like Picasa because high res photos can be posted there..

          With best regards, Hart
          ________________________________________
          <<< Colorado Narrow Gauge Color Slides from 1975
          Posted by: "Don Bergman" DBRenegade@... dbrenegade
          Date: Thu Mar 1, 2012 8:15 pm ((PST))

          George,

          What luck!

          The very first thing I would do is get a high quality scanner and digitally scan the slides into Photoshop. Do not save the original scans as any compressed file. Make backups. If the color has deteriorated any you can sometimes revive them.

          Once saved in this manner then....Try to find out if the slides are copyrighted. Several sources, especially Al Chione make a lot of color slides from the late 1930's on available over the past several decades. Slides by Richard Kindig, Richard Jackson and others. These slides were sold in sets. Are there any markings on the slides? Are they original slides or copies? If original then less likely they are copyrighted.

          Do you have any idea who took the slides. How many slides? The history of the slides? Do you have any documentation dating the slides, location, photographer? (There are many folks out here who can assist in documentation.) Is the date on the slides? Any idea how far back they go? Or are they all taken from around 1975?

          If Copyrighted then you cannot distribute them. If not, then once scanned they can easily be placed on a DVD and sold at a fee to cover your costs and time.

          I have scanned about 750 slides (and thousands of family ones), that I have on the RGS unfortunately these are copyrighted so if anyone would like to see them you have to pay me a visit! :-)

          Most likely there are lots of us out here who would like to see them? Much more interest if they date back to the era when the narrow gauge was still in operation.

          Feel free to contact me off line with questions on scanning. DBRenegade at Hotmail.com

          Don Bergman
          Holland, MI >>>
        • LARRY KLOSE
          There s some misstatements and hazardous generalities here. US copyright law declares that all original expressions of art, photos, sound, etc. memorialized in
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 2, 2012
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            There's some misstatements and hazardous generalities here.

            US copyright law declares that all original expressions of art, photos,
            sound, etc. memorialized in fixed form are copyrighted. No notices,
            registration, etc. are necessary. Marks and notification (e.g. "c" in a
            circle) may once have been required for some kinds of protection, but no
            longer.

            Items created since the latest changes to the copyright law are protected
            for 89 years, IIRC, for the owner or its assignee(s). Earlier creations may
            have been protected for shorter periods, may have required renewal and could
            be subject to other restrictions. There's a chart on the US Copyright
            office web site that sets out what protections and time periods apply to
            various works, based on the date of their creation (or sometimes, first
            publication) and the effective date of the various enactments and amendments
            to the law. Old slides or other photos may or may not be protected,
            depending on how these various factors apply.

            Registration is not required to validate copyright. Registration does give
            the owner some important rights including a presumption of copyright
            ownership, attorney's fees in successful litigation, statutory damages (no
            need to prove actual damage as with unregistered works) and other legal
            benefits.

            The US Copyright office web site has lots of accurate information about
            copyright which is much more reliable than presumption or guesses about how
            copyright works. Missing something important can cost a copyright violator
            _lots_ of money so it's worth studying.

            There are a few exceptions to copyright protection, such as "fair use." see
            the Copyright web site for an explanation but recall that the definition is
            vague in many areas and has often needed high-stakes litigation to resolve.

            This is a brief, general summary and is not legal advice. Consulting with a
            copyright/intellectual property attorney is advisable before distributing
            anything of doubtful status. Copyright is a very complex area and expert
            help in advance can save a lot of grief--and money.

            Larry

            -----previous message (snipped)---------

            <Once saved in this manner then....Try to find out if the slides are
            copyrighted. Several sources, especially Al Chione make a lot of color
            slides from the late 1930's on available over the past several decades.
            Slides by Richard Kindig, Richard Jackson and others. These slides were sold
            in sets. Are there any markings on the slides? Are they original slides or
            copies? If original then less likely they are copyrighted.

            Do you have any idea who took the slides. How many slides? The history of
            the slides? Do you have any documentation dating the slides, location,
            photographer? (There are many folks out here who can assist in
            documentation.) Is the date on the slides? Any idea how far back they go? Or
            are they all taken from around 1975?

            If Copyrighted then you cannot distribute them. If not, then once scanned
            they can easily be placed on a DVD and sold at a fee to cover your costs and
            time. >
          • Jeff Lucas
            Thank you so much for sharing these terrific slides! They are very helpful as references for modeling work. Jeff Lucas Community Development Services (CDS)
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 5, 2012
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              Thank you so much for sharing these terrific slides! They are very helpful
              as references for modeling work.



              Jeff Lucas

              Community Development Services (CDS)

              P.O. Box 645

              Glenhaven, CA 95443

              707-998-9203, ext. 104 - office

              707-489-4943 cell

              707-998-9209 fax

              jefflucas@...

              GO BEARS!





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