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How to do the 1916-1921 time period in HOn3

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  • Ed Anderson
    Guys, Blacksone is coming out with a early version of the C-19 that would do well beginning with about 1916. Anyone doing this early time? Any advice? Andy A
    Message 1 of 23 , May 1, 2010
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      Guys,
      Blacksone is coming out with a early version of the C-19 that would do well beginning with about 1916. Anyone doing this early time? Any advice?

      Andy A




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • homanfamily
      Hou about 1903? I do a fair amount of scratchbuilding and kit bashing, including locomotives. Pat Homan ... From: Ed Anderson To: HOn3@yahoogroups.com Sent:
      Message 2 of 23 , May 1, 2010
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        Hou about 1903? I do a fair amount of scratchbuilding and kit bashing, including locomotives.
        Pat Homan
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Ed Anderson
        To: HOn3@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, May 01, 2010 11:08 AM
        Subject: [HOn3] How to do the 1916-1921 time period in HOn3



        Guys,
        Blacksone is coming out with a early version of the C-19 that would do well beginning with about 1916. Anyone doing this early time? Any advice?

        Andy A

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Mike Conder
        Yes I m doing that time period too. I have two early version, painted unlettered C-19 s on order. I am also hoping they will have the early tenders available
        Message 3 of 23 , May 1, 2010
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          Yes I'm doing that time period too. I have two early version,
          painted unlettered C-19's on order. I am also hoping they will have
          the early tenders available separately so I can backdate C-16's into
          Class 60 locos.

          On the box cars, there was an article somewhere about backdating them
          and stock cars to the pre-rebuild design. I have copies but don't
          remember where I got them ... they may not be HOn3, I just don't
          remember.

          Rio Grande Models just came out with 4000-series work cars that can be
          converted to box cars. There were some 4000-series work cars in this
          era, though.

          I don't do passenger cars (yet) but I intend to get some from
          Blackstone, ones without electrical conduit on the roof. These are
          also reserved for me.

          Decals can be tricky but they are available.

          What else?

          Mike Conder
          Sent from my iPod

          On May 1, 2010, at 9:08 AM, Ed Anderson <longlancetorpedo@...>
          wrote:

          > Blacksone is coming out with a early version of the C-19 that would
          > do well beginning with about 1916. Anyone doing this early time? Any
          > advice?
        • brian
          ... Same here Pat. I m doing the EBT and the Tuscarora Vallley circa 1905. Not much for early eastern prototypes available, but locomotives can be brass
          Message 4 of 23 , May 2, 2010
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            --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, "homanfamily" <homanfamily@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hou about 1903? I do a fair amount of scratchbuilding and kit bashing, including locomotives.
            > Pat Homan
            >


            Same here Pat. I'm doing the EBT and the Tuscarora Vallley circa 1905. Not much for early eastern prototypes available, but locomotives can be "brass bashed", and the mostly Billemeyer & Smalls based freight cars are easy to scratchbuild. Passenger cars are more work but you don't need as many.
            Most of the brass 2-8-0's imported were based on prototypes built in the 1880's, but modeled as they appeared in the 30's and 40's. Usually some carefull removal of appliances, like twin air pumps, and substituting wood cabs get you close to turn of the century appearances for many roads. The old Lambert 2-6-0 is also a good engine to backdate, an many roads had medium sized moguls like the c&s prototype.
            Theres more building involved when doing turn of the century, but for some of us, thats where the fun is.

            brian b
          • Studedudeus
            In Dorman s Gunnison book page 86 shows engine 417 in 1910. It has a straight stack, box headlight, twin air pumps, and a high side (straight side) tender.
            Message 5 of 23 , May 2, 2010
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              In Dorman's Gunnison book page 86 shows engine 417 in 1910. It has a straight stack, box headlight, twin air pumps, and a high side (straight side) tender. The numbers are on the tender with D&RG on the wood cab.

              Page 88 shows engine 210 in early 1900s. Straight stack, box headlight, twin air pumps, steel cab sides and flair side tender. Numbers are on the tender with D&RG on the cab.

              Dorman's Chama/Cumbres book has a number of photos taken by Lively at Cumbres pass that show snow fighting trains with 5 or 6 engines together. Looking at those photos, there are diamond stacks and straight stacks in the same train. There are diamond stack engines with smooth domes and fluted domes. Diamond stacked engines with wood cabs and with steel cabs, flaired tenders and smooth side tenders. The same goes for straight stack engines.

              Considering that the RGS C-19s kept their box headlights almost to the end, and that D&RGW C-19s had both types of tenders, and both types of domes, I think there are plenty of parts if you want to build that pre-WWI era.

              Backdating Boxcars basically requires replacing the murphy roof with scribed sheet, and replacing the doors if you want to, with scribed sheet to represent the early style doors.

              Just some things to consider.

              --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, Mike Conder <vulturenest1@...> wrote:
              >
              > Yes I'm doing that time period too. I have two early version,
              > painted unlettered C-19's on order. I am also hoping they will have
              > the early tenders available separately so I can backdate C-16's into
              > Class 60 locos.
            • jcmm3030@aol.com
              Just a question: I always wondered when and why so many early D&RG locos got their domes changed from fluted to smooth. Can anyone answer this? John C.
              Message 6 of 23 , May 2, 2010
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                Just a question: I always wondered when and why so many early D&RG locos
                got their domes changed from fluted to smooth. Can anyone answer this?
                John C.


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • homanfamily
                Brian, I have to agree. You are the second person I have met who models the Tuscarora Valley. One of the upstate (Ohio) chaps also models the route. I think
                Message 7 of 23 , May 2, 2010
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                  Brian,
                  I have to agree. You are the second person I have met who models the Tuscarora Valley. One of the upstate (Ohio) chaps also models the route. I think he backdates C-16's which are close to a standard Baldwin design. I agree that you can't be afraid to take a soldering iron to an import brass engine. It drives collectors nuts but as I cheerfully told one, who was having a coniption, its my locomotive and my railroad.
                  Pat
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: brian
                  To: HOn3@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Sunday, May 02, 2010 10:46 AM
                  Subject: [HOn3] Re: How to do the 1916-1921 time period in HOn3





                  --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, "homanfamily" <homanfamily@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hou about 1903? I do a fair amount of scratchbuilding and kit bashing, including locomotives.
                  > Pat Homan
                  >

                  Same here Pat. I'm doing the EBT and the Tuscarora Vallley circa 1905. Not much for early eastern prototypes available, but locomotives can be "brass bashed", and the mostly Billemeyer & Smalls based freight cars are easy to scratchbuild. Passenger cars are more work but you don't need as many.
                  Most of the brass 2-8-0's imported were based on prototypes built in the 1880's, but modeled as they appeared in the 30's and 40's. Usually some carefull removal of appliances, like twin air pumps, and substituting wood cabs get you close to turn of the century appearances for many roads. The old Lambert 2-6-0 is also a good engine to backdate, an many roads had medium sized moguls like the c&s prototype.
                  Theres more building involved when doing turn of the century, but for some of us, thats where the fun is.

                  brian b





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Ed Anderson
                  Hey Mike, Thanks for the reply! it seems you have been on the lists here for a long time. Do you live in Colorado? I am one of the orginal crew on the C&TS
                  Message 8 of 23 , May 2, 2010
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                    Hey Mike,
                    Thanks for the reply! it seems you have been on the lists here for a long time. Do you live in Colorado? I am one of the orginal crew on the C&TS back in 70.
                    Just ordered a K-27 from caboose and will order the C-19s soon. I was doing On30 in1880s time period (CCRR) and I will finish someday--but now seems the time to do HOn3. We also have a teen that is trying to get into narrow gauge and we will be doing HOn3 together--he just ordered a K-27 also.

                    What will you do for decals? seems the engines had D&RG on the cab and large # on the tender. Have you thouhgt about people? Autos-wagons? Signs maybe from Art Griffin? Is code 55 OK in HOn3?

                     My setting will be just generic Colorado so I'm not worried about a specific area.

                    My room is 16'x16' and weve started the backdrop painting--so far so good!

                    We do have a set of Beam books from Sundance and these will help---Can't wait to get some benchwork down!!!

                    Any advise would be appreciated--this is our 1st layout.

                    Andy A (and teenager Cole)
                    [this e-mail mite help someone but we can take this off list if ya want]



                    ________________________________
                    From: Mike Conder <vulturenest1@...>
                    To: "HOn3@yahoogroups.com" <HOn3@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Sat, May 1, 2010 10:37:32 PM
                    Subject: Re: [HOn3] How to do the 1916-1921 time period in HOn3

                     
                    Yes I'm doing that time period too. I have two early version,
                    painted unlettered C-19's on order. I am also hoping they will have
                    the early tenders available separately so I can backdate C-16's into
                    Class 60 locos.



                    What else?

                    Mike Conder
                    Sent from my iPod

                    On May 1, 2010, at 9:08 AM, Ed Anderson <longlancetorpedo@ yahoo.com>
                    wrote:

                    > Blacksone is coming out with a early version of the C-19 that would
                    > do well beginning with about 1916. Anyone doing this early time? Any
                    > advice?







                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • alco985
                    Hi Ed, I am just starting to take down a standard gauge layout and swith to HOn3. I have a 16 x30 building for the layout. Mine will be a loose try at Chama
                    Message 9 of 23 , May 2, 2010
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                      Hi Ed, I am just starting to take down a standard gauge layout and swith to HOn3. I have a 16'x30' building for the layout. Mine will be a loose try at Chama to Cumbres and then a Monarch branch. I'm not worried that they werent connected, just two areas I would like to have. I live in Alliance Nebraska. I come to Colorado to operate now and then , where are you located?. I have 2 K-27s and also a C-19 on order plus close to 40 cars with more on order.Would like to see you plans for a layout. Mine will be more modern. Deb Fified
                      --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, Ed Anderson <longlancetorpedo@...> wrote:
                      >
                    • wcbeverly
                      I think it just naturally happened after rebuilds, they may have been lost or just out of fashion. The ring was something that was just slipped over the domes.
                      Message 10 of 23 , May 2, 2010
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                        I think it just naturally happened after rebuilds, they may have been lost or just out of fashion.

                        The ring was something that was just slipped over the domes. The ring on the CRRM engine 346 came off of engine 345 when it was wrecked for a movie shoot.
                        http://photoswest.org/cgi-bin/imager?00007505

                        If you look at older pictures of 346 it does not have the ring on the domes:
                        http://photoswest.org/cgi-bin/imager?00007515

                        Bill

                        --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, jcmm3030@... wrote:
                        >
                        > Just a question: I always wondered when and why so many early D&RG locos
                        > got their domes changed from fluted to smooth. Can anyone answer this?
                        > John C.
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                      • Kenneth Martin
                        Bill, 346 was not wrecked in a movie shoot, it derailed on Kenosha Pass while leased to the C&S in the 1930 s. It was rebuilt at the CB&Q/ C&S shops in
                        Message 11 of 23 , May 2, 2010
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                          Bill,

                          346 was not wrecked in a movie shoot, it derailed on Kenosha Pass
                          while leased to the C&S in the 1930's. It was rebuilt at the CB&Q/
                          C&S shops in Denver. That was also when it got a steel cab and a
                          "half flange" on the two center drivers.

                          Ken Martin

                          On May 2, 2010, at 4:42 PM, wcbeverly wrote:
                          > The ring was something that was just slipped over the domes. The
                          > ring on the CRRM engine 346 came off of engine 345 when it was
                          > wrecked for a movie shoot.
                          >
                          > Bill
                        • Brandan
                          Ken, Bill was talking about 345 s wreck not 346 s. Brandan
                          Message 12 of 23 , May 2, 2010
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                            Ken,

                            Bill was talking about 345's wreck not 346's.

                            Brandan

                            --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, Kenneth Martin <kmartin537@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Bill,
                            >
                            > 346 was not wrecked in a movie shoot, it derailed on Kenosha Pass
                            > while leased to the C&S in the 1930's. It was rebuilt at the CB&Q/
                            > C&S shops in Denver. That was also when it got a steel cab and a
                            > "half flange" on the two center drivers.
                            >
                            > Ken Martin
                            >
                            > On May 2, 2010, at 4:42 PM, wcbeverly wrote:
                            > > The ring was something that was just slipped over the domes. The
                            > > ring on the CRRM engine 346 came off of engine 345 when it was
                            > > wrecked for a movie shoot.
                            > >
                            > > Bill
                            >
                          • wcbeverly
                            Ken; I think you misunderstood what I wrote, the engines that were wrecked were 345 and 319 in the 1952 movie Denver & Rio Grande. 345 was painted the Bumble
                            Message 13 of 23 , May 2, 2010
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                              Ken;

                              I think you misunderstood what I wrote, the engines that were wrecked were 345 and 319 in the 1952 movie "Denver & Rio Grande." 345 was painted the Bumble Bee schema as a standing for 268. They were loaded with dynamite and pointed head on to each other and the throttles were opened up. The explosion destroyed both engines.

                              The story that I heard was that the dome rings that were on 345 were salvaged by Bob Richardson (or for him, can't remember which) and those are the rings on 346.

                              Bill Beverly

                              --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, Kenneth Martin <kmartin537@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Bill,
                              >
                              > 346 was not wrecked in a movie shoot, it derailed on Kenosha Pass
                              > while leased to the C&S in the 1930's. It was rebuilt at the CB&Q/
                              > C&S shops in Denver. That was also when it got a steel cab and a
                              > "half flange" on the two center drivers.
                              >
                              > Ken Martin
                              >
                              > On May 2, 2010, at 4:42 PM, wcbeverly wrote:
                              > > The ring was something that was just slipped over the domes. The
                              > > ring on the CRRM engine 346 came off of engine 345 when it was
                              > > wrecked for a movie shoot.
                              > >
                              > > Bill
                              >
                            • Kenneth Martin
                              Bill, You are right I did misunderstand and I apologize. Ken
                              Message 14 of 23 , May 2, 2010
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                                Bill,
                                You are right I did misunderstand and I apologize.

                                Ken

                                On May 2, 2010, at 6:33 PM, wcbeverly wrote:

                                >
                                > Ken;
                                >
                                > I think you misunderstood what I wrote, the engines that were
                                > wrecked were 345 and 319 in the 1952 movie "Denver & Rio Grande."
                                > 345 was painted the Bumble Bee schema as a standing for 268. They
                                > were loaded with dynamite and pointed head on to each other and the
                                > throttles were opened up. The explosion destroyed both engines.
                              • wcbeverly
                                No problem Ken; You were correct about 346, it derailed on Kenosha Pass while leased to the C&S in 1936. I also think that the engineer lost his life. This is
                                Message 15 of 23 , May 2, 2010
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                                  No problem Ken;

                                  You were correct about 346, it derailed on Kenosha Pass while leased to the C&S in 1936. I also think that the engineer lost his life.

                                  This is were 346 lost it's cab and dome rings and a bunch of other parts.

                                  Bill.

                                  --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, Kenneth Martin <kmartin537@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Bill,
                                  > You are right I did misunderstand and I apologize.
                                  >
                                  > Ken
                                  >
                                  > On May 2, 2010, at 6:33 PM, wcbeverly wrote:
                                  >
                                  > >
                                  > > Ken;
                                  > >
                                  > > I think you misunderstood what I wrote, the engines that were
                                  > > wrecked were 345 and 319 in the 1952 movie "Denver & Rio Grande."
                                  > > 345 was painted the Bumble Bee schema as a standing for 268. They
                                  > > were loaded with dynamite and pointed head on to each other and the
                                  > > throttles were opened up. The explosion destroyed both engines.
                                  >
                                • John Stutz
                                  ... Note that, regarding mixed diamond and straight stacks, the conversion to straight stack usually also involves an extension of the smokebox, from the
                                  Message 16 of 23 , May 3, 2010
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                                    Studedudeus wrote:
                                    >
                                    > .....
                                    >
                                    > Dorman's Chama/Cumbres book has a number of photos taken by Lively at
                                    > Cumbres pass that show snow fighting trains with 5 or 6 engines
                                    > together. Looking at those photos, there are diamond stacks and straight
                                    > stacks in the same train. There are diamond stack engines with smooth
                                    > domes and ringed domes. Diamond stacked engines with wood cabs and with
                                    > steel cabs, flaired tenders and smooth side tenders. The same goes for
                                    > straight stack engines.

                                    Note that, regarding mixed diamond and straight stacks, the conversion
                                    to straight stack usually also involves an extension of the smokebox,
                                    from the original 24-30" length, by about 18-24". Some extensions
                                    were considerably longer, as on some early Uintah 2-8-0s. These
                                    extensions were made to hold the internal screens that replaced those
                                    in the diamond stack, and to hold the cinders that the screens
                                    collected. They often had a cinder chute at the bottom well forward.

                                    The very long extensions died out circa 1910, as designers learned to
                                    arrange the internal baffling and screens so that larger sparks got
                                    broken up before being ejected. But the short smoke boxes
                                    characteristic of pre 1890 engines never came back.

                                    Additionally, the smokebox is a relatively corrosive environment, such
                                    that smokebox lifetime on a well used engine was somewhere around 20
                                    years. Most long lived engines had several, which could differ
                                    considerably.

                                    There will be exceptions to this general trend. So as always, its a
                                    good idea to find some suitable prototype photos before starting.
                                    Doubly so when freelancing, when it is so easy to create anachronisms.

                                    John
                                  • John Stutz
                                    ... I think it was mostly a matter of fashion. By 1900 relatively smooth domes were well established as the common style on modern engines, and the
                                    Message 17 of 23 , May 3, 2010
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                                      John C. <jcmm3030@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Just a question: I always wondered when and why so many early D&RG locos
                                      > got their domes changed from fluted to smooth. Can anyone answer this?

                                      I think it was mostly a matter of fashion. By 1900 relatively smooth
                                      domes were well established as the common style on modern engines, and
                                      the prominently ringed domes of the 1870s and early 80's were becoming
                                      a sign of antique engines. Changing out the dome castings let one
                                      modernize an engine's appearance, at least in the public eye, at
                                      minimal expense. They are simple castings with few critical
                                      dimensions and could be made at any foundry possessing suitable capacity.

                                      I am not aware of any Colorado narrow gauge engines that had fluted
                                      domes. Those had gone out of fashion circa 1860, well before narrow
                                      gauge construction began. But I am not very familiar with the earlier
                                      engines. Can anyone produce a photograph of an example, or is this
                                      just a commonly accepted misuse of the word?

                                      John Stutz
                                    • Glenn
                                      ... got their domes changed from fluted to smooth. Can anyone answer this? Almost all early engines had plenty of fluting, filigree, scroll-work, and
                                      Message 18 of 23 , May 3, 2010
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                                        > Just a question: I always wondered when and why so many early D&RG locos
                                        got their domes changed from fluted to smooth. Can anyone answer this?

                                        Almost all early engines had plenty of fluting, filigree, scroll-work, and
                                        adornments. But as railroads became an industry, all this stuff became a
                                        maintenance nightmare.

                                        Pride said to keep all the stuff polished and shiny. Everyday nitty-gritty
                                        work required that more time be spent on keeping locos running.

                                        Glenn
                                      • Studedudeus
                                        I suppose it is my misuse of the word that got this started. I ve always heard the Baldwin domes on D&RG engines (like those seen on 346 now) referred to as
                                        Message 19 of 23 , May 3, 2010
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                                          I suppose it is my misuse of the word that got this started. I've always heard the Baldwin domes on D&RG engines (like those seen on 346 now) referred to as Fluted domes. They are very prominent on D&RG Class 56, Class 60 and Class 70 engines from the very beginning when they were constructed. Perhaps they are more properly known as Flanged Domes. The class 60 engines built by Cooke were built with a similar dome, though the center wrapper was taller, and the flanges not so prominent.

                                          The Round domes, which I'll agree, appear more modern seem to appear first on the Cooke engines. But also on a few Class 70 (later C-17) engines as early as 1890. There are even a few photos of engine 404 with a mixture of domes, and a diamond stack.

                                          My guess is that, just like with tenders, when an engine arrived for major overhaul, it got stripped down and all the components went out for their individual repars. Cab to the carpenter's shop, tender to whereever, domes, pumps, etc. out for their overhauls. When the boiler/running gear were ready, a group of parts were gathered up to make a whole engine. Since the Rio Grande had a rather large fleet of very similar Consolidations, they didn't really care which domes, cab, tender, pump, etc. they used out of the pile, just put some stuff back on the engine and got her running.

                                          So what should I be calling those domes?

                                          Phil

                                          --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, John Stutz <John.C.Stutz@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > John C. <jcmm3030@...> wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > > Just a question: I always wondered when and why so many early D&RG locos
                                          > > got their domes changed from fluted to smooth. Can anyone answer this?
                                          >

                                          >
                                          > I am not aware of any Colorado narrow gauge engines that had fluted
                                          > domes. Those had gone out of fashion circa 1860, well before narrow
                                          > gauge construction began. But I am not very familiar with the earlier
                                          > engines. Can anyone produce a photograph of an example, or is this
                                          > just a commonly accepted misuse of the word?
                                          >
                                          > John Stutz
                                          >
                                        • jcmm3030@aol.com
                                          John and all-- I guess the question is: if we call the earlier 1860s era domes fluted, what do we call the 1875-1880 era domes found on the C-60s of that
                                          Message 20 of 23 , May 3, 2010
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                                            John and all--

                                            I guess the question is: if we call the earlier 1860s era domes
                                            fluted, what do we call the 1875-1880 era domes found on the C-60s of that
                                            time? The Baldwin domes changed to the rounded style quickly in the early
                                            1880s--so that's the question here. John C.


                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          • John Stutz
                                            http://bowser-trains.com/hoother/calscale/Cal-Scale-Steam-Loco-Parts2.jpg ... John I doubt that even 1860 s era domes should be called fluted. Perhaps some
                                            Message 21 of 23 , May 3, 2010
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                                              http://bowser-trains.com/hoother/calscale/Cal-Scale-Steam-Loco-Parts2.jpg


                                              John C <jcmm3030@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > I guess the question is: if we call the earlier 1860s era domes
                                              > fluted, what do we call the 1875-1880 era domes found on the C-60s of that
                                              > time? The Baldwin domes changed to the rounded style quickly in the early
                                              > 1880s--so that's the question here.

                                              John

                                              I doubt that even 1860's era domes should be called fluted. Perhaps
                                              some from the 1840's or 50's. Technically, fluting is parallel
                                              rounded grooving, such as seen on the sides of stainless steel
                                              passenger cars of the 1940's and 50's, or the vertical parallel
                                              grooves on classical architectural columns. I have looked for fluted
                                              domes occasionally, without finding any examples. Perhaps the closest
                                              is the sand dome of the CalScale #342 dome set, but that has radial
                                              fluting on the dome cover. See
                                              http://bowser-trains.com/hoother/calscale/Cal-Scale-Steam-Loco-Parts2.jpg

                                              As for what to call the domes supplied in the 1870's and early 1880's,
                                              I prefer ringed and someone just now was calling them flanged.
                                              Regarding the smoother domes, I have run across modern references to
                                              helmet style domes, but this may be a modern invention. I was never
                                              clear if this referred to the 1880's-1900's style, or the single piece
                                              pressed steel domes that were introduced around 1900.

                                              I am not aware of any widespread designations in the contemporary
                                              prototype literature. I do not recall that John White's American
                                              Locomotives has anything pertinent about dome style designations, but
                                              his coverage ends in the 1870's, just when things start to get
                                              interesting. There may be some semi-official designations available
                                              in the Locomotive Dictionaries, but the earliest I have access to
                                              dates from 1906, a little on the late side.

                                              John Stutz
                                            • Duncan Harvey
                                              Andy, We ve talked on the phone several times. Your title says something about how to do the 1916-1921 time period in HOn3. I am modeling 1878-1920, or so.
                                              Message 22 of 23 , May 15, 2010
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                                                Andy,

                                                We've talked on the phone several times. Your title says something about how to do the 1916-1921 time period in HOn3. I am modeling 1878-1920, or so. What is it you want to know? I'll help if I can.
                                                Duncan

                                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                              • Ed Anderson
                                                Duncan, just got done with a daughters wedding! Actually I think I have most of everything answered for now--thanks! Andy ________________________________
                                                Message 23 of 23 , May 18, 2010
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                                                  Duncan,
                                                  just got done with a daughters wedding! Actually I think I have most of everything answered for now--thanks!
                                                  Andy




                                                  ________________________________
                                                  From: Duncan Harvey <train3guy@...>
                                                  To: HOn3@yahoogroups.com
                                                  Sent: Sat, May 15, 2010 3:20:06 PM
                                                  Subject: Re: [HOn3] Re: How to do the 1916-1921 time period in HOn3

                                                   
                                                  Andy,

                                                   What is it you want to know? I'll help if I can.
                                                  Duncan

                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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