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Re: Durango and Silverton Videos

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  • ntspdy
    I really appreciate the complement, I ve been waiting years to get a nice digital camcorder and finally did this Christmas. The many aspects of making a good
    Message 1 of 26 , Mar 2 8:02 PM
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      I really appreciate the complement, I've been waiting years to get a nice digital camcorder and finally did this Christmas. The many aspects of making a good short film intrigue me.

      The first two videos were hand held. The camera does have a "vibration dampening" feature which helps. For the third video I was sitting in my truck with the window down and the camera on the door. I'm headed back to Durango this weekend and hope to get more video, time permitting.
    • ntspdy
      Forgot to answer your question in my last post. The Polar Express runs just to the edge of town where they do a North Pole show for the kids. After the show,
      Message 2 of 26 , Mar 2 8:18 PM
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        Forgot to answer your question in my last post. The Polar Express runs just to the edge of town where they do a North Pole show for the kids. After the show, they uncouple the engine and pull the train back to the station with the diesel. The engine follows not far behind going backwards. I really wanted to get some video of this but the family was tired and ready for bed. Maybe next year.

        --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, Kjb80401@... wrote:
        >
        >
        > By the way, what was that diseasel doing pulling up the rear?
        >
      • Mark
        The Hollywood tool you are thinking of is called a Steadicam. Works on the basis of spinning gyroscopes and stops any sudden movement when the camera is
        Message 3 of 26 , Mar 3 1:08 AM
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          The Hollywood tool you are thinking of is called a Steadicam. Works on the basis of spinning gyroscopes and stops any sudden movement when the camera is handheld. This is similar and is built into many 'better' video cameras and some longer still camera lenses.

          Mark

          --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, Kjb80401@... wrote:
          >
          > Doug,
          >
          > On the 3rd one I agree with you, it had to be. On the two he posted
          > previously taken on the ride, he said it was handheld. A notable accomplishment
          > in my opinion.
          >
          > Keevan
          >
          >
          > In a message dated 3/2/2010 2:27:39 P.M. Mountain Standard Time,
          > DougCummings@... writes:
          >
          > I think the tool you are thinking of is called a
          > tripod.
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • David Tenney
          all, im not sure why but i am terrified of brass!! i look at brass engines and i cringe, not really sure why, i guess i ve just hear too many horror stories
          Message 4 of 26 , Mar 3 8:42 AM
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            all,

            im not sure why but i am terrified of brass!! i look at brass engines and i cringe, not really sure why, i guess i've just hear too many horror stories about what can go wrong.


            with that being said i would like to know what people think of the PSC Crown Series Engines? either from experience or others stories. any and all help will be greatly appreciated.


            Dave T.




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • John Stutz
            Mark wrote: regarding video image stability ... I understand that some electronic cameras add electronic stabilization. Possibly a matter of time slicing the
            Message 5 of 26 , Mar 3 11:00 AM
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              Mark wrote: regarding video image stability
              >
              > The Hollywood tool you are thinking of is called a Steadicam. Works on
              > the basis of spinning gyroscopes and stops any sudden movement when the
              > camera is handheld. This is similar and is built into many 'better'
              > video cameras and some longer still camera lenses.

              I understand that some electronic cameras add electronic
              stabilization. Possibly a matter of time slicing the exposure,
              computing best match pixel offsets, and generating the final exposure
              by summing the offset sub-exposures. This would reduce image blurring
              due to camera shake to under 1 pixel average, probably better than
              most of us can do hand held. But I do not know if this can be done
              fast enough to match video frame rates.

              John Stutz
            • Jim Vail
              David - The Crown Series of brass locomotives imported by PSC are limited run, very accurate, super-detailed, beautiful locomotive models. Some (usually the
              Message 6 of 26 , Mar 3 12:52 PM
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                David -

                The Crown Series of brass locomotives imported by PSC are limited run,
                very accurate, super-detailed, beautiful locomotive models. Some
                (usually the smaller locos) have had some minor electrical problems -
                shorts and "opens" - but nothing that can't be fixed with a little
                patience. Others run great right out of the box. Unfortunately, some
                folks (usually the inexperienced) have painted a "horror story" picture
                of scale brass. I have posted notes on some of my experiences in
                getting some narrow gauge crowns to run. My notes were intended as a
                guide to what to look for with a new locomotive, and I hope you didn't
                interpret these as "horror stories".

                PSC Crowns - and many other brass locomotives - may take some fiddling
                to get them on the road, but they are hand built, exquisite models that
                will run well for many years. Personally I have installed Tsunami
                decoders in about 30 old and almost new HOn3 brass locomotives for my
                railroad. Most run great and pull about twice as much as the newer
                composite construction locos.

                Don't be afraid of brass! - its the next step towards being a more well
                rounded, experienced modeler.

                Jim Vail

                David Tenney wrote:
                >
                >
                > i would like to know what people think of the PSC Crown Series Engines
                > from experience .
                > Dave T.
                >
              • Kjb80401@aol.com
                As I recall, back in the 60 s PFM imported models built to this high-end standard, known also as Crown . Keevan In a message dated 3/3/2010 1:54:49 P.M.
                Message 7 of 26 , Mar 3 1:04 PM
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                  As I recall, back in the 60's PFM imported models built to this high-end
                  standard, known also as 'Crown'.

                  Keevan


                  In a message dated 3/3/2010 1:54:49 P.M. Mountain Standard Time,
                  akacoot@... writes:

                  PSC Crowns - and many other brass locomotives - may take some fiddling
                  to get them on the road, but they are hand built, exquisite models that
                  will run well for many years.


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • David Barron
                  With over 200 pieces myself, I agree with Jim. You have to tweak them here and there as they are not shake the box and they fall out running well. A little
                  Message 8 of 26 , Mar 3 1:29 PM
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                    With over 200 pieces myself, I agree with Jim. You have to tweak them here
                    and there as they are not shake the box and they fall out running well. A
                    little adjustment here or there to make them excellent runners is to be
                    expected. Brass is an art form just like anything else and those that
                    appreciate it value them the most. Not all enjoy looking at the Mona Lisa,
                    that's wy Picaso came along!
                    mule
                  • ebt18
                    I share the same nervousness about tackling brass. I have a couple of EBT Hallmark mikes that have been sitting on my workbench for several years. One needs
                    Message 9 of 26 , Mar 4 4:28 AM
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                      I share the same nervousness about tackling brass. I have a couple of EBT Hallmark mikes that have been sitting on my workbench for several years. One needs painting (yikes!) and both of them need for me to take the bull by the horns and install sound decoders in them. Then I read all the stuff about having to construct all-wheel pickups underneath, and I get that panicky feeling again. However, I now have an HOn3 layout for the first time, and I have a couple of the new Digitrax sound decoders, so I guess I can't avoid it any longer....

                      Russ Norris

                      --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, Jim Vail <akacoot@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > > Don't be afraid of brass! - its the next step towards being a more well
                      > rounded, experienced modeler.
                      >
                    • Mark
                      Is it the soldering that freaks people out or taking the engine apart? Because the actual installation is not that difficult though it can be made more
                      Message 10 of 26 , Mar 4 11:46 PM
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                        Is it the soldering that freaks people out or taking the engine apart? Because the actual installation is not that difficult though it can be made more complicated if the loco has an open frame motor.

                        I certainly haven't done as many as 200 but at a guess 40 or so, some of which I also had to re-motor.
                        My advice would be

                        1) if you haven't yet learned to solder, do so. Practice on soldering two wires together. You don't need a high powered iron or a temperature controlled one for this - something like a 15 - 18 watt iron is adequate but make sure the tip is small, nothing bigger than 1/8".
                        It's good practice to have something like a damp, non plastic, sponge to wipe the tip and keep it clean - solder and wipe. You can also use damp kitchen paper. Don't use lead free solder, it doesn't hold a candle to the 'real' stuff. Get it with the resin in the core, the electrical version

                        2) if it's a bad runner on DC then it will surely be a bad runner on DCC. The time to clean and rectify shorts and binds is before you fit the decoder. If it's a short then run it in a darkened room and watch for tiny sparks, a bind is more difficult and really depends on the loco.

                        3) Start by taking the loco apart and putting it back together immediately. Don't start the installation work until you can do this confidently. Loco usually has three screws holding the body on - one under the stack (you might have to remove the front truck), two at the back. The tender usually has four underneath, one in each corner. Some models, earlier ones had just had two in the middle. Some were glued or soldered and they're a bit more difficult.

                        4) All wheel pickup is highly desirable but not essential. There are many locos running well without it. The 'problem' with DCC is that if there is a break in the supply from the rails, the decoder has to reset. In the case of a sound decoder that might mean cycling through the start up sequence - the Con Cor goose is a real bear at this.
                        But quite often making sure the electrical path is clean will ensure a good supply. The places which cause most problems are the drawbar and the pin onto which it locates - corrosion on older models is to be expected. There is usually a phosphor bronze spring which brushes against the pin and you should replace this if possible. The other area to watch for is in the trucks. The top of the truck and the bolster provide the contact and if they're corroded then you'll have a problem. I'd clean them with a fiber brush though now I fit pick ups as well.

                        The rest is quite honestly just common sense and patience. I'd say that fitting a decoder is much easier than painting a loco - quicker too.

                        Mark Kasprowicz

                        --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, "ebt18" <rbnorrisjr@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I share the same nervousness about tackling brass. I read all the stuff about having to construct all-wheel pickups underneath, and I get that panicky feeling again. However, I now have an HOn3 layout for the first time, and I have a couple of the new Digitrax sound decoders, so I guess I can't avoid it any longer....
                        >
                        > Russ Norris
                        >
                        > --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, Jim Vail <akacoot@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > > Don't be afraid of brass! - its the next step towards being a more well
                        > > rounded, experienced modeler.
                        > >
                        >
                      • Mark
                        ... I forgot one more area which i discovered on a old Westside SPNG 9 the other week. The truck was screwed into a brass bolster as usual, but the bolsters
                        Message 11 of 26 , Mar 5 1:09 AM
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                          >The other area to watch for is in the trucks. The top of the truck and the bolster provide the contact and if they're corroded then you'll have a problem.

                          I forgot one more area which i discovered on a old Westside SPNG 9 the other week. The truck was screwed into a brass bolster as usual, but the bolsters wasn't soldered onto the tender frame, they were screwed from the inside of the frame. When these were taken off they revealed a real horror story and a major cause of the intermittent running.

                          Mark Kasprowicz
                        • Dennis Larson
                          ... sparks, a bind is more difficult and really depends on the loco. Mark, Jim, Laurie, Loco Doc and others... I appreciate all the tips you ve shared over the
                          Message 12 of 26 , Mar 5 4:45 AM
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                            > If it's a short then run it in a darkened room and watch for tiny
                            sparks, a bind is more difficult and really depends on the loco.

                            Mark, Jim, Laurie, Loco Doc and others...

                            I appreciate all the tips you've shared over the years about getting
                            brass to run reliably.
                            I still find it a stomach-souring mystery most of the time. Particularly
                            with one of my engines that is supposed to have a good reputation.

                            I have a Westside K-36 that I've remotored, added insulated washers
                            outside the pilot wheels, hard wired tender trucks to the frame, added
                            wipers to the engineer side drivers, installed a Tsunami with a 2200 mfd
                            capacitor to "stay alive", installed the Blackstone 8-pin drawbar and,
                            recently, rewired it to eliminate the enameled wire and any possibility
                            of shorts due to insulation being worn off.

                            The only obvious thing I have yet to do is add fireman side wipers. If
                            the insulation in the left side drivers is breaking down I don't know
                            how I could detect it; my ohmmeter doesn't detect a short there.
                            The engine still shorts out randomly. Sometimes on straight sections
                            with no turnouts!

                            I've tried running in the dark and have never seen a spark or short. But
                            the engine still stalls.

                            I don't remember having the same trouble when I ran this engine using
                            Dynatrol several years ago.

                            What could I be missing. Is the Tsunami itself suspect?

                            Meanwhile, my crude old Balboa K-36 with the same Tsunami decoder, and
                            no chassis mods, runs like a Blackstone.
                            Even my Balboa C-21 with TCS decoder runs better than the Westside.
                            And my two Con-Cor geese, with TCS decoders, are smooth as silk. My 3
                            Blackstones are 99 percent reliable.

                            FYI, virtually all my turnouts have live frogs to assure an
                            uninterrupted electrical path. My layouts operating radius is 22".

                            As you can see, I'm about ready to give up on the Westside K-36. It's be
                            apart so many times that I can't count them.
                            I am desperate for Blackstone to bring out its K-36. I'll be the first
                            in line to reserve some.

                            My Westside is virtually certain to screw up an otherwise pain-free
                            operating session!

                            Dennis

                            >
                            >
                          • linnwm
                            Dennis, I appreciate your frustration. I have only brass and most all have been reworked considerably and like full sized steam locomotives, no two are alike.
                            Message 13 of 26 , Mar 5 7:57 AM
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                              Dennis,



                              I appreciate your frustration. I have only brass and most all have been
                              reworked considerably and like full sized steam locomotives, no two are
                              alike. Personally, I like the challenge and it gives me the opportunity for
                              machine work which I love to do. I maintain that any brass locomotive can be
                              made to run reliably. That being said, I have been stumped for long periods
                              of time on more than one occasion.



                              I have a Westside K-36 that I remotored immediately because the original was
                              just too small. The locomotive ran well for many years - wore out 2 Sagami
                              motors, but on the third motor a problem with the gearbox surfaced that
                              required replacement with a NWSL assembly. I have never had electrical
                              problems with this locomotive. I use DC simply because the advantages of DCC
                              are not worth the extra layer of complexity. I use PFM and PBL sound systems
                              which while adding a layer of complexity, their failure does not prevent the
                              operation of the locomotive, albeit in stealth mode.



                              Someone said in a previous thread that the locomotive needs to operate well
                              on DC or it won't work with DCC. I would agree and suggest that you remove
                              the decoder and test the engine on DC. You will easily be able to tell if
                              there is a short with an ammeter and you will get a little time to poke and
                              prod to make the short go away - a luxury you don't have with DCC. If no
                              short is indicated or there is not an excessive jump in amperage indicating
                              a bind, then you are dealing with a loss of contact. Poking and prodding in
                              a focused manner while the engine is stalled can sometimes point out the
                              trouble area. I have never seen the insulation break down between the wheels
                              and the tires. It is possible that this gap can be shorted by conducting
                              debris though that would usually be constant, but not always.



                              Don't underestimate the value of careful observation during complete
                              disassembly and reassembly. Assume nothing and look critically at
                              everything, one piece at a time. When the wheels are out, twist them between
                              your fingers lightly to detect any looseness. Test the electrical continuity
                              between the tires - there should be none. Check the tender wheels for
                              continuity and that they are all aligned electrically.



                              As to binds, that can be a real bear. The older PFM K's (at least the ones I
                              have), are notorious for being out of quarter and/or out of stroke. Just as
                              the real thing, you have a bit more wiggle room with quarter than with
                              stroke. If a driver is out of stroke, which is the throw of the crankpin,
                              the bind can be very severe when the rods pass front and back dead center.
                              This can also be confused with a quarter problem on the opposite side where
                              the rods are at top or bottom quarter. Sometimes you can determine the side
                              giving the problem by seeing which rods are tight, but not always. If the
                              quarter is out far enough to hold the opposite side both above and below
                              front or back dead center it may appear to be a stroke problem. Visually
                              seeing that all the pins are in a horizontal line on the side on dead center
                              sometimes reveals the problem. Once the problem is located the typical fix
                              is to enlarge the rod eye to eliminate the bind. This works sometimes if the
                              problem is not too severe, but the best solution is to accurately quarter
                              the drivers, re-stroke them as needed (as little as 0.003" off stroke can be
                              a problem), and bush the rods to as close a running fit as you can. If a
                              bind still exists and all the pins are in their proper location it is not
                              too difficult to locate the offending pin(s) and open the rod eyes a bit.
                              Bushing the rods is not that difficult using brass tubing. Put it in a drill
                              and file it down to a long taper until it slips into the existing rod eye.
                              Solder it and file off the excess. Ream the holes to fit. I think Micro-Mark
                              sells the long taper miniature reamers.



                              Sometimes a bind is the result of a tram problem which can be the axles out
                              of alignment (they should all be exactly perpendicular to the longitudinal
                              centerline), and/or the distance between the axle centers differs slightly
                              from the center-to-center distance of the corresponding rod eyes. This can
                              occur with drivers that are in proper quarter and stroke. Make sure all the
                              axles are on the same horizontal plane. If the frame is bent or twisted or
                              if one of the driving boxes is bored off center, or with a locomotive having
                              the axle slots milled directly in the frame and one is deeper than another -
                              all these can cause a bind and are fairly easy to detect and correct.



                              If it is any consolation, all this stuff happens on the big engines as well
                              and it can drive you nuts trying to find the problem. The nice thing about
                              the little stuff is not needing a crane. I would recommend magnifiers,
                              though.



                              I don't know if any of this helps, but I just hate to see a nice model not
                              running.



                              Linn





                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • 23weldon
                              Mark -- Thanks for the useful and concise write-up of info on setting up a brass loco for better running and DCC. That little bit of info on SPNG 9 models is
                              Message 14 of 26 , Mar 5 8:01 AM
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                                Mark -- Thanks for the useful and concise write-up of info on setting up a brass loco for better running and DCC. That little bit of info on SPNG 9 models is going to come in handy when I get to restoring a basket case that is waiting for my "loving touch".
                                Ed Weldon

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • rlmossholder
                                Gang, I just purchased an old PSC 0-6-0t saddle tanker on ebay. I have always wanted one of these, but the prices were beyond reality. This time I got lucky
                                Message 15 of 26 , Mar 5 9:39 AM
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                                  Gang,
                                  I just purchased an old PSC 0-6-0t saddle tanker on ebay. I have always wanted one of these, but the prices were beyond reality. This time I got lucky and got it for a steal!

                                  I thought I'd try my hand at painting and updating it. The loco ran pretty well on DC power, but had some slight hesitation due to poor quartering of the wheel sets. I have been told that this is paramount to a smooth running, reliable mechanism. I took the advice and gave it a shot. What a difference! It's an easy fix with an NWSL quartering tool, and should be done to all brass rod locomotives. I will be scheduling this for all of my brass rod locos.

                                  I temporarly installed a small DCC decoder to see how things would run and fit. While testing the loco with the decoder, I found that the insulated side pick-ups were causing very small and intermittant shorts. This loco came with two spring loaded pin style pick-ups that brushed against the back of the wheels. PSC isolated these wheels at the tire rather than the axel and the pins were making enough contact to short things out. While running on DC, there was enough power to overcome this issue. Just becuse it runs well on DC does not mean it's good to go for DCC. The way I found this was to use a multi-meter in the ohms setting while rotating the mechanism. I was able to see all of the issues for shorting. This test led me to creating and installing new wipers for the wheels. I tested the mechanism again with the multi-meter with great results.

                                  This is my first real attempt at painting a brass locomotive. I have tried it in the past with a small diesel critter, but that was just with a rattle can. It turned out nice though. This time I wanted to create something special. I wanted one of those pro looking paint jobs.

                                  The first step was to completely disassemble the engine and prep it for paint. I started with a thorough washing of the parts with dish soap. When dry I gave it a second wash with denatured alcohol. It dries fast and has no water in it. From this point on I wore nitrile gloves when handling the model.

                                  I started with a coat of self-etching primer which I purchased from an auto paint supplier. This gives a rock solid primer coat that etches itself into the metal and provides a great surface for paint to stick to. I've heard a lot of guys just paint directly over the brass, but I think a primer coat is one of the keys for a durable paint job.

                                  The next step was to choose the colors. This was more difficult than I thought it would be. I called on Craig Hoefer for some suggestions and he sent me to his website: www.pacificng.com where I found several Baldwin paint scemes for this loco! Craig and team have really put together a great website and I highly recommend it as a resource.

                                  I settled on a green paint scheme. I changed things up a bit for my freelnced line and used some of my NPC decals to make things look right(for me). I am not trying to copy another RR's paint sceme. I am using Model Masters paint, because I like how it mixes and sprays. The finish coat will be Model Masters semi-gloss clear laquer.

                                  I think the most time consuming aspect of painting a locomotive is masking off the parts. This paint job has so far taken 5 days, and I'm not finished yet! I'll post some pics of the finished result.

                                  So far I have had a lot of fun with this, I especially enjoyed painting the cab interior. I should be getting the new decoder for it today as well as the tiney LED's for lighting. I still need to figure out how to work in a set of couplers. I can't wait to see her working the docks!

                                  I know a lot of you are hesitant to tear into one of your prize brass models, but I think you should give it a try. There are a lot of folks here on this list with the right knowledge and the willingness to pass it along. This is not as hard as you might think. It just takes a little effort and patience. Don't be discouraged about making mistakes with the paint, you can always strip it and start over. Remember, it took Eddison 1000 tries to get the light bulb to work; and when asked about it, he said he found 999 ways to not make a light bulb. Have faith in yourself and courage in your conviction. YOU CAN DO IT!

                                  Cheers,
                                  Rich Mossholder
                                • Dennis Larson
                                  Lynn and Rich, This tread is providing some tips I can use and comments I will save. I m not a trained machinist and don t own tools like a lathe or quartering
                                  Message 16 of 26 , Mar 5 7:58 PM
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                                    Lynn and Rich,
                                    This tread is providing some tips I can use and comments I will save.
                                    I'm not a trained machinist and don't own tools like a lathe or
                                    quartering tool.
                                    I'm wondering if the Tsunami decoder is reacting to small voltage drops
                                    from one section of track to another that do not affect the other engines.
                                    I've removed any brass that could be in contact with swinging trucks, etc.
                                    These frustrations with brass take a lot of modeling time away from
                                    building rolling stock, structures and scenery and sure slow down
                                    progress on my layout.
                                    Nevertheless, I really appreciate the detailed responses and
                                    encouragement I get from this group.
                                    Dennis

                                    >
                                    >
                                  • rlmossholder
                                    Dennis, The NWSL quartering tool costs less than $30(?) and is well worth the investment. You don t need to be a machinest with a lathe to make things run
                                    Message 17 of 26 , Mar 5 8:52 PM
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                                      Dennis,

                                      The NWSL quartering tool costs less than $30(?) and is well worth the investment. You don't need to be a machinest with a lathe to make things run well, just some basic hand tools and a little mechanical knowledge. An NWSL puller is another great tool to have in the box. Don't forget an NMRA track gauge to check your wheels. Make sure that all your wheels are clean too. Home Depot sells an electrical cleaner called CRC 2-26 in the electrical section. Apply a light coat to the wheel treads and pick-ups with a q-tip. Clean your track and wipe it on there too. LET IT DRY OVER NIGHT BEFORE RUNNING ANY TRAINS! You will find that things run much better. The CRC 2-26 that you use to coat the rail and wheels is very conductive. This really helps with DCC, especially with sound.

                                      Cheers,
                                      Rich Mossholder
                                    • davetrimble1
                                      Dennis, I have an old Westside K-36 also. To get it to run reliably on 20 redius curves (and thru switches), I had to trim the frame on either side of the
                                      Message 18 of 26 , Mar 6 7:30 AM
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                                        Dennis,

                                        I have an old Westside K-36 also.

                                        To get it to run reliably on 20" redius curves (and thru switches), I had to trim the frame on either side of the pilot truck and on the trailing truck also. The culprit was the wheel flange on each truck. Once cleared she runs nicely -- even without added wipers (I always try for that first, then the wipers add reliability).

                                        Note that, even if you can't see any sparks ina dark room, you may be able to see slight discoloration on the left-side wheel flange on each truck.

                                        Good luck,
                                        Dave Trimble
                                        508 778-1142

                                        --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, Dennis Larson <denzack@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > > If it's a short then run it in a darkened room and watch for tiny
                                        > sparks, a bind is more difficult and really depends on the loco.
                                        >
                                        > Mark, Jim, Laurie, Loco Doc and others...
                                        >
                                        > I appreciate all the tips you've shared over the years about getting
                                        > brass to run reliably.
                                        > I still find it a stomach-souring mystery most of the time. Particularly
                                        > with one of my engines that is supposed to have a good reputation.
                                        >
                                        > I have a Westside K-36 that I've remotored, added insulated washers
                                        > outside the pilot wheels, hard wired tender trucks to the frame, added
                                        > wipers to the engineer side drivers, installed a Tsunami with a 2200 mfd
                                        > capacitor to "stay alive", installed the Blackstone 8-pin drawbar and,
                                        > recently, rewired it to eliminate the enameled wire and any possibility
                                        > of shorts due to insulation being worn off.
                                        >
                                        > The only obvious thing I have yet to do is add fireman side wipers. If
                                        > the insulation in the left side drivers is breaking down I don't know
                                        > how I could detect it; my ohmmeter doesn't detect a short there.
                                        > The engine still shorts out randomly. Sometimes on straight sections
                                        > with no turnouts!
                                        >
                                        > I've tried running in the dark and have never seen a spark or short. But
                                        > the engine still stalls.
                                        >
                                        > I don't remember having the same trouble when I ran this engine using
                                        > Dynatrol several years ago.
                                        >
                                        > What could I be missing. Is the Tsunami itself suspect?
                                        >
                                        > Meanwhile, my crude old Balboa K-36 with the same Tsunami decoder, and
                                        > no chassis mods, runs like a Blackstone.
                                        > Even my Balboa C-21 with TCS decoder runs better than the Westside.
                                        > And my two Con-Cor geese, with TCS decoders, are smooth as silk. My 3
                                        > Blackstones are 99 percent reliable.
                                        >
                                        > FYI, virtually all my turnouts have live frogs to assure an
                                        > uninterrupted electrical path. My layouts operating radius is 22".
                                        >
                                        > As you can see, I'm about ready to give up on the Westside K-36. It's be
                                        > apart so many times that I can't count them.
                                        > I am desperate for Blackstone to bring out its K-36. I'll be the first
                                        > in line to reserve some.
                                        >
                                        > My Westside is virtually certain to screw up an otherwise pain-free
                                        > operating session!
                                        >
                                        > Dennis
                                        >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        >
                                      • David Tenney
                                        all,   i have found a HOn3 brass engine that i really REALLY would like to get my hands on. unfortunately the only way i will be able to afford this baby is
                                        Message 19 of 26 , Mar 9 1:39 PM
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                                          all,

                                            i have found a HOn3 brass engine that i really REALLY would like to get my hands on. unfortunately the only way i will be able to afford this baby is to sell what BS stock i have as a single estate in order to raise funds for the engine purchase....no biggy, BS will be around and so will their rolling stock!

                                             so i was wondering if anyone out there is interested, i was hoping to keep it to US buyers only, dont really feel like dealing internationally...sorry :(

                                             i have 18 pieces of mint in box rolling stock, all Flying Grande Weathered, 3 caboose(1 weathered), i have also thought about throwing in my sunset brass 268 fully weathered with crew in hopes that it may entice someone.

                                             contact me off line if you are interested...serious buyers only, i have what i think is a great deal and will not budge.

                                          Dave T.





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                                        • David Tenney
                                          all, i have sold my brass c-16 and 3 caboose. i still have 15 pieces left. i want to sell this as a whole...again in hopes of raising enough to get a very nice
                                          Message 20 of 26 , Mar 9 8:01 PM
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                                            all,


                                            i have sold my brass c-16 and 3 caboose. i still have 15 pieces left. i want to sell this as a whole...again in hopes of raising enough to get a very nice brass engine. whats left are flats, stocks, box and high side gondolas. all pieces are weathered and flying grande. contact me offline if you are interested in these 15 pieces, i am selling them at a really great rate. i wanted to post this on here one last time before i head to ebay!


                                            Dave





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                                          • David Tenney
                                            all, just another piece of information, if you are interested in purchasing ALL 15pieces i would be will to sell at or less than $35 a piece! Dave T. all
                                            Message 21 of 26 , Mar 9 9:27 PM
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                                              all,

                                              just another piece of information, if you are interested in purchasing ALL 15pieces i would be will to sell at or less than $35 a piece!


                                              Dave T.


                                              all pieces are weathered including a special edition box car





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