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Re: Headlights

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  • augustine_thompson
    Dear John, Thanks. That confirmed my suspicion exactly. And yes, I know exactly what arc lights are like--back in the 1970s I spent some time running
    Message 1 of 18 , Sep 4, 2009
      Dear John,

      Thanks. That confirmed my suspicion exactly. And yes, I know exactly what arc lights are like--back in the 1970s I spent some time running old-fashioned arc-light movie projectors. You never, never, looked directly at the arc chamber, even with a protective visor.
    • szczowicz
      Augustine, I don t think you can on this decoder. When you move functions, which is what this was all about, you move objects away from an area in the decoder
      Message 2 of 18 , Sep 4, 2009
        Augustine,

        I don't think you can on this decoder. When you move functions, which is what this was all about, you move objects away from an area in the decoder which has a predetermined function. For instance most of the function keys are latching, a bit like a light switch. Press once to switch something on, press again to switch it off. The only non latching function key is F2 which is used for the whistle in a sound decoder - makes sense as you want to use it like a car horn. F0 is associated with lights but in many cases it automatically swaps direction and like you I cannot see anything in the sparse Lenz manual to change that.

        > That worked like a charm! The light now stays on, going forward, backward, or stopped. And F1 turns it off. If you don't mind, how would I get the on-off function assigned to F0? On my control that has the indication for light.
        >
        > And could you suggest where I might find a manual or book that would explain how to do this kind of programing in a format?

        Not really but I have a better idea. Decoder Pro is free shareware available from within here in Yahoo Groups (JMRI it's called). You'll need an interface between computer and command station which can either be a thing called a LocoBuffer, or the dedicated USB to UART converter from the manufacturer of you command station or a British device SPROG II, which does the same thing. I use the SPROG as it is small and convenient and means I don't have to carry the command station around with me as I use a laptop and a piece of track on my desk for programing.

        Mark
      • augustine_thompson
        Thanks, Mark. I have contacted my LHS about the ordering the SPROG II. It sounds like a good solution. I have Decorder Pro installed on my computer, but I
        Message 3 of 18 , Sep 5, 2009
          Thanks, Mark.

          I have contacted my LHS about the ordering the SPROG II. It sounds like a good solution. I have Decorder Pro installed on my computer, but I had not yet bought one of the interfaces since I was unsure which was best way to connect. Your suggestion seems the best solution.

          I would still like to know where I could go for more information and help on the technicalities of DCC programming.
        • Don Bergman
          Been trying to track down headlights for an ole oil burner head light as well as one for a 1920’s electric one to work with Tsunami Sound decoders.
          Message 4 of 18 , Sep 27, 2015
             
            Been trying to track down headlights for an ole oil burner head light as well as one for a 1920’s electric one to work with Tsunami Sound decoders.
             
             
            This web site appears to have what I need put would appreciate any comments on my choices.
             
            Looks like I should go with the 7-19 volt   Pico 1.8 mm size with the warm white for the oil lamp and cool white for the electric one.
             
            This is my first brass  headlight installation so comments would be appreciated.
             
            Don Bergman
            Holland, MI



             
          • Mike Conder
            Don, Your friend in this is Tamiya orange transparent paint. A couple of coats and you can yellow up almost any LED to get a color you like. Also, I like
            Message 5 of 18 , Sep 27, 2015

              Don,

              Your friend in this is Tamiya orange transparent paint.  A couple of coats and you can "yellow up" almost any LED to get a color you like.

              Also, I like the look of an MV lens, small hole drilled in the back and filled with an appropriately-colored SML.  The LED looks like a scale-sized point light source, like bulb or arc.

              Mike Conder

            • szczowicz
              I buy all of my SML s from the Ledbaron in Germany on Ebay, have done for years. What you re looking for are either 0402, 0401 or 0603 SML s in Warm Weiss
              Message 6 of 18 , Sep 28, 2015
                I buy all of my SML's from the "Ledbaron" in Germany on Ebay, have done for years. What you're looking for are either 0402, 0401 or 0603 SML's in Warm Weiss (Warm white). They come with wires attached. The 0603's are perfect for HOn3 headlights while the 0402's can be used for markers as well as headlights.

                Tamiya transparent paints are great for getting the effect you need but the orange is quite intense, yellow is less so.

                SML's are current sensitive, low voltage devices. These days they are also very bright. I use a minimum of an 8.2KOhm resistor in series with one of the wires (doesn't matter which). If that is too bright then you  need to go much higher. Adding 1 or 2 KOhms to the total value will not yield any difference - you need to go into the 20 - 30K range, perhaps higher.

                MV lenses are great I agree but rather than drill them, just put them on the tip of your finger, silver side down and rub them against a fine file or emery paper - if you've done it right, the hole in the silvering should be in the center, if it isn't enlarge it until it is. I superglue the LED onto this hole. I use Aleens glue to set them into the headlight.

                A couple of points regarding the drilling out for the LED wires. ALWAYS make sure the headlight is supported at the opposite end to the drill. Many headlights like Pyles are only held on by four small solder points and the combination of pressure and heat can break the joint. Let the drill do the work, keep the speed slow and you should have no problems. Also look for the easiest route for the wires to go, you might end up drilling from underneath the boiler right through to the top. Finally (sorry this is so long winded) getting the thin LED wires though a multiple of small holes can be difficult. So use a piece of thin straight wire (phosphor bronze is best but brass will work) and push it up from the initial drill hole - this will be the straightest route. Carefully solder the LED wires to it and pull them through. It's easier to do one wire at a time.


                Mark K
                Durango CO.
              • snookdust2001
                I use a 1k 1/8 watt resistor for headlights in a modern type locomotive and a 2.2 k for the 1880-1920 types. The longer wire on the smds should go to the
                Message 7 of 18 , Sep 28, 2015
                  I use a 1k 1/8 watt resistor for headlights in a "modern" type locomotive and a 2.2 k for the 1880-1920 types. The longer wire on the smds should go to the resistor-at least to my experience.   Bob V.
                   
                  In a message dated 9/28/2015 9:22:02 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, HOn3@yahoogroups.com writes:
                  minimum of an 8.2KOhm resistor in series with one of the wires (doesn't matter which).
                • Mike Conder
                  I like that last tip, never thought of that! Brilliant. Mike Conder
                  Message 8 of 18 , Sep 28, 2015

                    I like that last tip, never thought of that!  Brilliant.

                    Mike Conder

                  • Jeff Young
                    ... Indeed. I saved the whole email in a file. Thanks! Cheers, Jeff.
                    Message 9 of 18 , Sep 28, 2015
                      I like that last tip, never thought of that!  Brilliant.

                      Indeed.  I saved the whole email in a file.  Thanks!

                      Cheers,
                      Jeff.
                    • hoghead32
                      Those looking for old time box style HO headlights might want to see Cal Scale Baldwin Box Type headlights, part number 190-305. If you use this part number
                      Message 10 of 18 , Oct 20, 2015
                        Those looking for old time box style HO headlights might want to see Cal Scale "Baldwin Box Type" headlights, part number 190-305. If you use this part number on Walthers site, you'll see what it looks like and also see it isn't in stock, but coming from China.  MBuckelew
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