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Re: Headlights

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  • augustine_thompson
    Dear John, Thanks. That confirmed my suspicion exactly. And yes, I know exactly what arc lights are like--back in the 1970s I spent some time running
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 4, 2009
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      Dear John,

      Thanks. That confirmed my suspicion exactly. And yes, I know exactly what arc lights are like--back in the 1970s I spent some time running old-fashioned arc-light movie projectors. You never, never, looked directly at the arc chamber, even with a protective visor.
    • szczowicz
      Augustine, I don t think you can on this decoder. When you move functions, which is what this was all about, you move objects away from an area in the decoder
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 4, 2009
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        Augustine,

        I don't think you can on this decoder. When you move functions, which is what this was all about, you move objects away from an area in the decoder which has a predetermined function. For instance most of the function keys are latching, a bit like a light switch. Press once to switch something on, press again to switch it off. The only non latching function key is F2 which is used for the whistle in a sound decoder - makes sense as you want to use it like a car horn. F0 is associated with lights but in many cases it automatically swaps direction and like you I cannot see anything in the sparse Lenz manual to change that.

        > That worked like a charm! The light now stays on, going forward, backward, or stopped. And F1 turns it off. If you don't mind, how would I get the on-off function assigned to F0? On my control that has the indication for light.
        >
        > And could you suggest where I might find a manual or book that would explain how to do this kind of programing in a format?

        Not really but I have a better idea. Decoder Pro is free shareware available from within here in Yahoo Groups (JMRI it's called). You'll need an interface between computer and command station which can either be a thing called a LocoBuffer, or the dedicated USB to UART converter from the manufacturer of you command station or a British device SPROG II, which does the same thing. I use the SPROG as it is small and convenient and means I don't have to carry the command station around with me as I use a laptop and a piece of track on my desk for programing.

        Mark
      • augustine_thompson
        Thanks, Mark. I have contacted my LHS about the ordering the SPROG II. It sounds like a good solution. I have Decorder Pro installed on my computer, but I
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 5, 2009
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          Thanks, Mark.

          I have contacted my LHS about the ordering the SPROG II. It sounds like a good solution. I have Decorder Pro installed on my computer, but I had not yet bought one of the interfaces since I was unsure which was best way to connect. Your suggestion seems the best solution.

          I would still like to know where I could go for more information and help on the technicalities of DCC programming.
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