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Re: [HOn3] Re: Headlights

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  • John Stutz
    ... By modern standards, oil burning locomotive headlamps lamps were very very dim. Thats why the later oil headlights were so large - to fit in a really big
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 4, 2009
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      augustine_thompson wrote:
      > ... could you estimate what percentage of the
      > light put out by a "typical" electric / arc light would have been
      > typical for one of the older oil lamps?

      By modern standards, oil burning locomotive headlamps lamps were very
      very dim. Thats why the later oil headlights were so large - to fit
      in a really big parabolic reflector that could catch most of the
      lamp's light and reflect it forward. As for how dim - have you ever
      tried driving in full dark with only your parking lights? You can do
      it, so long as there are no other electric lights in sight, because
      your eyes will adapt to the light level. But it is not easy.

      Acetylene lamps were noticeably brighter, perhaps twice as bright as oil.

      Arc lights were dangerously bright. Their arc is essentially
      identical to that produced by an electric arc welder, and direct
      viewing from close up could burn out the eyes' visual receptors. I
      do not think that they lasted long, once reliable incandescent bulbs
      became available, say after the 1910-20 decade. But they came into
      use in the late 1890s because they were the best way to get enough
      light, far enough forward, to begin to safely run the fast passenger
      and mail trains that were coming into use.

      John Stutz
    • augustine_thompson
      Dear John, Thanks. That confirmed my suspicion exactly. And yes, I know exactly what arc lights are like--back in the 1970s I spent some time running
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 4, 2009
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        Dear John,

        Thanks. That confirmed my suspicion exactly. And yes, I know exactly what arc lights are like--back in the 1970s I spent some time running old-fashioned arc-light movie projectors. You never, never, looked directly at the arc chamber, even with a protective visor.
      • szczowicz
        Augustine, I don t think you can on this decoder. When you move functions, which is what this was all about, you move objects away from an area in the decoder
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 4, 2009
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          Augustine,

          I don't think you can on this decoder. When you move functions, which is what this was all about, you move objects away from an area in the decoder which has a predetermined function. For instance most of the function keys are latching, a bit like a light switch. Press once to switch something on, press again to switch it off. The only non latching function key is F2 which is used for the whistle in a sound decoder - makes sense as you want to use it like a car horn. F0 is associated with lights but in many cases it automatically swaps direction and like you I cannot see anything in the sparse Lenz manual to change that.

          > That worked like a charm! The light now stays on, going forward, backward, or stopped. And F1 turns it off. If you don't mind, how would I get the on-off function assigned to F0? On my control that has the indication for light.
          >
          > And could you suggest where I might find a manual or book that would explain how to do this kind of programing in a format?

          Not really but I have a better idea. Decoder Pro is free shareware available from within here in Yahoo Groups (JMRI it's called). You'll need an interface between computer and command station which can either be a thing called a LocoBuffer, or the dedicated USB to UART converter from the manufacturer of you command station or a British device SPROG II, which does the same thing. I use the SPROG as it is small and convenient and means I don't have to carry the command station around with me as I use a laptop and a piece of track on my desk for programing.

          Mark
        • augustine_thompson
          Thanks, Mark. I have contacted my LHS about the ordering the SPROG II. It sounds like a good solution. I have Decorder Pro installed on my computer, but I
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 5, 2009
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            Thanks, Mark.

            I have contacted my LHS about the ordering the SPROG II. It sounds like a good solution. I have Decorder Pro installed on my computer, but I had not yet bought one of the interfaces since I was unsure which was best way to connect. Your suggestion seems the best solution.

            I would still like to know where I could go for more information and help on the technicalities of DCC programming.
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