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How can I make White Metal?

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  • Paul Richardson
    I keep seeing the term white metal and I know what it is but my question is how can I make some? Does anyone here know the formula and if so, would you be
    Message 1 of 23 , Jan 1, 2008
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      I keep seeing the term white metal and I know what it is but my question is
      how can I make some? Does anyone here know the formula and if so, would you
      be willing to share it?

      Thanks,

      Paul Richardson, MMR
      .

      <http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=141273/grpspId=1706533813/msgId=
      49609/stime=1199174050/nc1=3848627/nc2=4025321/nc3=4990222>



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • dave4844@aol.com
      I don t know about making it but is readily available in the UK [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 23 , Jan 1, 2008
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        I don't know about making it but is readily available in the UK






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bob Thomas
        Other terms to consider are PEWTER and BRITANIA metal (sic). Model ship builders prefer kits with detail parts of Britannia metal. More Durable. As a former
        Message 3 of 23 , Jan 1, 2008
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          Other terms to consider are PEWTER and BRITANIA metal (sic).

          Model ship builders prefer kits with detail parts of Britannia metal. More Durable.

          As a former transportation token collector, I will not get into the arguments over color of brass and bronze !!

          I do know that Dick Orr for his lost-wax casting of trackwork switches (points and frogs) cast them in a product used for casting of bathroom/kitchen faucets: Tombisil.

          Since I'm not a metalurgist. U'd say we need a reference metalutgist in the discussion.

          Senior moment !! There is a metal which melts under 100 degrees C or 212F and is not lead. They use it in the aircraft industry to be a pot-metal to hold assembly fixtures. Melts about 150-155 degrees F. You could pour it into plastic loco shells to make permanent weight. (Damn senior moment.)

          Bob T

          PS Now Is the time to plan for that Valentine's Day gift locomotive.

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: dave4844@...
          To: HOn3@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2008 11:03 AM
          Subject: Re: [HOn3] How can I make White Metal?


          I don't know about making it but is readily available in the UK

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Glenn476
          collectively trade names like Cerrobend, Cerrosafe, Bear Metal, --Ya gotta be kidding--I thought anyone reaching MMR had to come into the use of these
          Message 4 of 23 , Jan 1, 2008
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            collectively trade names like Cerrobend, Cerrosafe, Bear Metal, --Ya gotta
            be kidding--I thought anyone reaching MMR had to come into the use of these
            alloys---mostly the ones that melt at lower temps than lead--gj
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Paul Richardson" <paul@...>
            To: <HOn3@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2008 7:35 AM
            Subject: [HOn3] How can I make White Metal?


            >I
          • Paul Richardson
            Bob, I think you are thinking of Cerrobend. Paul Richardson, MMR [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 23 , Jan 1, 2008
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              Bob,

              I think you are thinking of Cerrobend.

              Paul Richardson, MMR


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Paul Richardson
              I have a small supply of cerrobend but wasn t sure if it was considered white metal or if white metal is a specific mixture of metals. That is the beauty of
              Message 6 of 23 , Jan 1, 2008
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                I have a small supply of cerrobend but wasn't sure if it was considered
                white metal or if white metal is a specific mixture of metals.
                That is the beauty of this hobby, no one knows everything and everyone
                (including MMRs) can learn from each other.

                Paul Richardson, MMR

                _____

                From: HOn3@yahoogroups.com [mailto:HOn3@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                Glenn476
                Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2008 12:12 PM
                To: HOn3@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [HOn3] How can I make White Metal?

                collectively trade names like Cerrobend, Cerrosafe, Bear Metal, --Ya gotta
                be kidding--I thought anyone reaching MMR had to come into the use of these
                alloys---mostly the ones that melt at lower temps than lead--gj
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Paul Richardson" <paul@purgatoryandde
                <mailto:paul%40purgatoryanddevilriver.com> vilriver.com>
                To: <HOn3@yahoogroups. <mailto:HOn3%40yahoogroups.com> com>
                Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2008 7:35 AM
                Subject: [HOn3] How can I make White Metal?

                >I



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Tom Lawhorn
                Problem is, Paul, there isn t any unique formula. White metal is a collective term applied to any of several alloys having a variety of uses and containing
                Message 7 of 23 , Jan 1, 2008
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                  Problem is, Paul, there isn't any unique formula. "White metal" is a
                  collective term applied to any of several alloys having a variety of uses
                  and containing primarily lead and/or tin. They typically melt around 300-500
                  degrees F - below the melting point of many solders (also a white metal)!
                  Metals used in white metal alloys are mainly lead and/or tin, with antimony,
                  bismuth, cadmium, copper, indium and zinc. Not all are present in any given
                  alloy.

                  Pewter is a white metal consisting of mainly tin (85-96%), but pewter alone
                  comes in mainly 3 grades with sub-flavors! Eg. high grade pewter (called
                  fine) is 96-99 percent tin, and 1-4 percent copper.

                  Another white metal is linotype metal, which is about 84 per cent lead, 12
                  per cent antimony and four per cent tin. Its useful characteristics include
                  castability, hardness and cooling characteristics.

                  Another class of alloys noted by others are the Cerro products, notable for
                  very low melting points and exotic expansion/contraction characteristics.
                  The main members are:

                  Cerrobend Tin 13.3%, Bismuth 50%, Lead 26.7% Cadmium 10% (158 deg F)
                  Cerrosafe Tin 11.3%, Bismuth 42.5% Lead 37.7% Cadmium 8.5% (164 deg F)

                  Cerrolow 136 Tin 12% Bismuth 49% Lead 18% Indium 21% (136 deg F)

                  Cerrolow 117 Tin 8% Bismuth 4.7% Lead 22.6% Cadmium 5.3% Indium 19.1% (117
                  deg F)

                  (source Birchon's Dictionary of Metallurgy London 1965)

                  A metallurgical term of interest is "eutectic". Crudely put, a eutectic
                  alloy has a proportion of components such that all components crystallize at
                  the same temperature upon cooling. Non-eutectic alloys, such as Cerrosafe
                  [all others above are eutectic], exhibit strange and frequently useful
                  characteristics. As it cools, Cerrosafe shrinks and then expands, making it
                  possible to easily cast things without shrinkage loss.

                  All the Cerro products have been used to weight models, and none will cause
                  a serious burn at their melting point. A model weighted with Cerrolow may
                  not survive a hot day in Phoenix :>)

                  Tom


                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Paul Richardson
                  Subject: [HOn3] How can I make White Metal?


                  I keep seeing the term white metal and I know what it is but my question is
                  how can I make some? Does anyone here know the formula and if so, would you
                  be willing to share it?

                  Thanks,

                  Paul Richardson, MMR
                • Paul Richardson
                  Bill Wade from B.T.S. gave me a website where I can get the casting materials I m looking for. Paul Richardson, MMR [Non-text portions of this message have
                  Message 8 of 23 , Jan 1, 2008
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                    Bill Wade from B.T.S. gave me a website where I can get the casting
                    materials I'm looking for.

                    Paul Richardson, MMR



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • eabracher@aol.com
                    I use Tin, bismuth, and antimony. Any foundry can make it to your specs. Or you can order from Conquest in Santa Fe Springs or Contenti in RI. eric
                    Message 9 of 23 , Jan 1, 2008
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                      I use Tin, bismuth, and antimony. Any foundry can make it to your specs.
                      Or you can order from Conquest in Santa Fe Springs or Contenti in RI.

                      eric


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