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Re: [HOn3] Re: Tender switch.

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  • Dale Buxton
    Hi Mark, 217 did in fact get some petty good and unusual photo coverage. She was the engine evolved in wreck near Porter in 1919. She went through a trestle at
    Message 1 of 23 , Aug 2, 2006
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      Hi Mark,

      217 did in fact get some petty good and unusual photo
      coverage. She was the engine evolved in wreck near
      Porter in 1919. She went through a trestle at flood
      swollen “Lightner Creek” and drowned the engineer.
      Check “Silver San Juan” or “The RGS Story Vol. IX”.



      The 217’s air pumps are 9½ inch as opposed to 268’s
      11’s and 217 had a carbon-arc box-headlight and a
      “Buda” type generator at the time, but other than that
      the machines are very similar. If you changed the
      domes to fluted, I’m pretty sure 227 can be modeled.
      But I would have to check my research again to be 100%
      on that.

      By the mid teens, dual airpumps on the “C” classes was
      getting very common. As were those box, carbon-arc
      headlight fixtures.

      Dale



      --- Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:

      > Hi Dale,
      >
      > I knew about the tender swops - the rebuilt one on
      > 315 dates to the
      > early 40's which is the groups' selected time
      > period. I also know of a
      > PSC k-28 #478 with 474's tender! I like to think
      > that the DRGW intended
      > to swop the tenders over or at least knew when they
      > had done it,
      > whereas PSC....
      >
      > The problem with using the 268 to accurately model
      > another C-16 is that
      > it's a bit singular in some respects mainly on the
      > engineer's side. You
      > mention #217 which I believe was scrapped in in the
      > 20's. I think that
      > may have been before the class received twin air
      > pumps. I've found most
      > of Mal Hope Ferrel's articles and they sort of help
      > but again the
      > pictures tend to be of the most commonly
      > photographed locos - so far
      > I've not been able to locate a picture of 217
      > anywhere - be interested
      > to hear from you if you have.
      > I already have a couple of C-16 - #268 bumble bee
      > and a toilet seat
      > 278. So with non fluted domes the best I think I can
      > do with this is to
      > convert the loco into 223 (just add the air tank and
      > forget the running
      > board) unless I can find something more appropraite.
      >
      >
      > But I'm intrigued by the idea that someone has a
      > #223 loco with #268's
      > tender and who has that #478 tender running behind
      > #474?
      >
      > Mark
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >


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    • Mark Kasprowicz
      Hi Dale, Checked RGS IX (never thought of looking in the RGS Story) Pics show the Fireman s side with the two pumps. So you re spot on about the twin pump
      Message 2 of 23 , Aug 2, 2006
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        Hi Dale,
        Checked RGS IX (never thought of looking in the RGS Story) Pics show
        the Fireman's side with the two pumps. So you're spot on about the
        twin pump changes happening earlier that the 20's. Nothing in SSJ as
        far as I can see though. I rather like the idea of a reprieved 217
        working alongside the other long servers into the late 30's. But she's
        going to have a Pyle headlight - not taking that off - like them too much.
        Now can anyone help on getting the PSC decals off without damaging the
        paint? Denatured alcohol (aka Meths in the UK) perhaps? MicroSol is
        based on meths I think judging by the smell.
        Finally, thanks for the mention of 315. She won't be ready to run for
        the NGC/ Railfest in Durango this year though it will be on show
        obviously. Not sure of a final running date but I suspect (hope)
        before the turn of this year. But on that subject does anyone know
        whether a model of 315 was ever made by any brass importer. And if
        you're watching Blackstone, would it not be a worthy contender for a
        future model?
        Best from England
        Mark Kasprowicz
        PS Does anyone know why Micro Trains have bowed out of the convention?






        --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, Dale Buxton <the_one_tuatha_ddana@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hi Mark,
        >
        > 217 did in fact get some petty good and unusual photo
        > coverage. She was the engine evolved in wreck near
        > Porter in 1919. She went through a trestle at flood
        > swollen "Lightner Creek" and drowned the engineer.
        > Check "Silver San Juan" or "The RGS Story Vol. IX".
        >
        >
        >
        > The 217's air pumps are 9½ inch as opposed to 268's
        > 11's and 217 had a carbon-arc box-headlight and a
        > "Buda" type generator at the time, but other than that
        > the machines are very similar. If you changed the
        > domes to fluted, I'm pretty sure 227 can be modeled.
        > But I would have to check my research again to be 100%
        > on that.
        >
        > By the mid teens, dual airpumps on the "C" classes was
        > getting very common. As were those box, carbon-arc
        > headlight fixtures.
        >
        > Dale
        >
        >
        >
        > --- Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Hi Dale,
        > >
        > > I knew about the tender swops - the rebuilt one on
        > > 315 dates to the
        > > early 40's which is the groups' selected time
        > > period. I also know of a
        > > PSC k-28 #478 with 474's tender! I like to think
        > > that the DRGW intended
        > > to swop the tenders over or at least knew when they
        > > had done it,
        > > whereas PSC....
        > >
        > > The problem with using the 268 to accurately model
        > > another C-16 is that
        > > it's a bit singular in some respects mainly on the
        > > engineer's side. You
        > > mention #217 which I believe was scrapped in in the
        > > 20's. I think that
        > > may have been before the class received twin air
        > > pumps. I've found most
        > > of Mal Hope Ferrel's articles and they sort of help
        > > but again the
        > > pictures tend to be of the most commonly
        > > photographed locos - so far
        > > I've not been able to locate a picture of 217
        > > anywhere - be interested
        > > to hear from you if you have.
        > > I already have a couple of C-16 - #268 bumble bee
        > > and a toilet seat
        > > 278. So with non fluted domes the best I think I can
        > > do with this is to
        > > convert the loco into 223 (just add the air tank and
        > > forget the running
        > > board) unless I can find something more appropraite.
        > >
        > >
        > > But I'm intrigued by the idea that someone has a
        > > #223 loco with #268's
        > > tender and who has that #478 tender running behind
        > > #474?
        > >
        > > Mark
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
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        > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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        >
      • Dale Buxton
        ... Hey Mark, PSC’s latest builder/painter is using some of the toughest paint I have ever seen. It’s akin to epoxy based paints in durability. So far, I
        Message 3 of 23 , Aug 2, 2006
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          --- Mark Kasprowicz <marowicz@...> wrote:


          > does anyone know
          > whether a model of 315 was ever made by any brass
          > importer.

          Hey Mark,

          PSC’s latest builder/painter is using some of the
          toughest paint I have ever seen. It’s akin to epoxy
          based paints in durability. So far, I have not found a
          solvent that will loosen it! Except for Aircraft Epoxy
          Paint Stripper. But I hate to use that stuff because
          it is so hard on the lungs and on brass it likes to
          etch the surface. I have been able to use denatured
          wood alcohol (shellac thinner) to remove decals from
          PSC’s recent generation of paints without so much as
          dulling the factory finnish.

          Funny you should ask. Key Imports/Samhongsa did the
          315 as well as the 316, 318 and 319 in Hon3. Some were
          offered as factory painted. This was Key’s second run
          of the C-18’s and they were based on PBL’s Sn3
          research. They show up on Ebay from time to time. Once
          again there is a tender switching problem with these
          models. I have seen the 315 (although properly
          lettered 315) with the tenders of the 318 and 319. Key
          had no answers.

          The pictures of the 217 in SSJ are on page 196 & 197.
          Very similar to the ones in RGS Story Vol. IX though.

          Dale


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        • Mike Conder
          QUick point of chemical correction: denatured alcohol is ethanol (ethyl alcohol, the fun stuff!) with a denaturing agent such as methanol or a similar
          Message 4 of 23 , Aug 3, 2006
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            QUick point of chemical correction: denatured alcohol is ethanol (ethyl alcohol, the fun stuff!) with a denaturing agent such as methanol or a similar hydrocarbon liquid. Wood alcohol is methanol, which is a denaturing agent, so it really isn't denatured.

            Mike Conder, spedning too much time in chemistry class ... 8^)

            Dale Buxton wrote:

            > ... I have been able to use denatured wood alcohol (shellac thinner) to remove decals from PSCs recent generation of paints without so much as
            dulling the factory finish....

            .



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Dale Buxton
            Mike, I just typed what was written on the can. I can t account for the makers intelligence or lack there of. Dale ...
            Message 5 of 23 , Aug 3, 2006
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              Mike,

              I just typed what was written on the can. I can't
              account for the makers intelligence or lack there of.

              Dale

              --- Mike Conder <vulturenest1@...> wrote:

              > QUick point of chemical correction: denatured
              > alcohol is ethanol (ethyl alcohol, the fun stuff!)
              > with a denaturing agent such as methanol or a
              > similar hydrocarbon liquid. Wood alcohol is
              > methanol, which is a denaturing agent, so it really
              > isn't denatured.
              >
              > Mike Conder, spedning too much time in chemistry
              > class ... 8^)
              >
              > Dale Buxton wrote:
              >
              > > ... I have been able to use denatured wood alcohol
              > (shellac thinner) to remove decals from PSCs recent
              > generation of paints without so much as
              > dulling the factory finish....
              >
              > .
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been
              > removed]
              >
              >


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            • Mark Kasprowicz
              Mike, You can make ethyl slcohol (ethanol) from wood! In fact any plant that ferments - might taste a little different though, Bit of fractional distillation
              Message 6 of 23 , Aug 3, 2006
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                Mike,
                You can make ethyl slcohol (ethanol) from wood! In fact any plant
                that ferments - might taste a little different though, Bit of
                fractional distillation and then whoop in the odd shot of methanol or
                a cocktail (NOT) to your taste. And Whammo - detatured wood alcohol.
                Tautology I know but what the heck, it's a living language.
                Mark
              • avawebmaster
                ... Ethanol (C2H5OH), also known as ethyl alcohol or grain alcohol, is a flammable, tasteless, colorless, mildly toxic chemical compound with a distinctive
                Message 7 of 23 , Aug 3, 2006
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                  --- In HOn3@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Kasprowicz" <marowicz@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Mike,
                  > You can make ethyl alcohol (ethanol) from wood! In fact any plant
                  > that ferments - might taste a little different though,

                  "Ethanol (C2H5OH), also known as ethyl alcohol or grain alcohol, is a
                  flammable, tasteless, colorless, mildly toxic chemical compound with a
                  distinctive odor, one of the alcohols that is most often found in
                  alcoholic beverages."

                  "Methanol, also known as methyl alcohol or wood alcohol, is a chemical
                  compound with chemical formula CH3OH. It is the simplest alcohol, and
                  is a light, volatile, colourless, flammable, poisonous liquid with a
                  distinctive odor. It is used as an antifreeze, solvent, fuel, and as a
                  denaturant for ethyl alcohol."

                  Best not to drink it......

                  EJ
                • Mark Kasprowicz
                  I don t think fermenting wood results in wood alcohol per se - it a a fractional by-product, it was once a seruious sourse hence it s name. Agree about not
                  Message 8 of 23 , Aug 3, 2006
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                    I don't think fermenting wood results in wood alcohol per se - it'a a
                    fractional by-product, it was once a seruious sourse hence it's name.
                    Agree about not drinking it though a large number of winos slurp up
                    denatured ethanol here.
                    Anyroadup we're well off topic here and I'm sure you'd want to drink
                    to that!
                    Mark
                  • Mike Conder
                    Man, you must have gotten a new Optivisor to be able to be able to split hairs that fine! Quoting Wikipedia (easy to copy on the web, but same data in many
                    Message 9 of 23 , Aug 3, 2006
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                      Man, you must have gotten a new Optivisor to be able to be able to split hairs that fine!

                      Quoting Wikipedia (easy to copy on the web, but same data in many other encyclopedias):

                      "Methanol, also known as methyl alcohol or wood alcohol, is a chemical compound with chemical formula CH3OH. It is the simplest alcohol, and is a light, volatile, colourless, flammable, poisonous liquid with a distinctive odor. It is used as an antifreeze, solvent, fuel, and as a denaturant for ethyl alcohol.Methanol, also known as methyl alcohol or wood alcohol, is a chemical compound with chemical formula CH3OH. It is the simplest alcohol, and is a light, volatile, colourless, flammable, poisonous liquid with a distinctive odor. It is used as an antifreeze, solvent, fuel, and as a denaturant for ethyl alcohol."

                      It's called wood alcohol because it was originally distilled from boxwood. And yes, one can make ethanol from wood but not very efficiently. Good lab exercise for college students, that's about all. I can see it now: "Ponderosa Tequila, now made from pine trees ... "

                      Mike Conder


                      Mark Kasprowicz wrote:

                      " You can make ethyl slcohol (ethanol) from wood! ..."

                      .



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Mark Kasprowicz
                      Didn t say it was practical, only that it was possible. Mark Kasprowicz
                      Message 10 of 23 , Aug 3, 2006
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                        Didn't say it was practical, only that it was possible.
                        Mark Kasprowicz
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