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Re: Color Scheme

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  • the_one_tuatha_ddana
    John, If this helps and if you have access to the book The Mineral Belt Vol. I . On page 106 there is a black and white picture of the Breckenridge at the
    Message 1 of 18 , Jun 1, 2004
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      John,

      If this helps and if you have access to the book "The Mineral Belt
      Vol. I". On page 106 there is a black and white picture of
      the "Breckenridge" at the Mason Machine works. The engine shine
      looks flat because photographers that worked for builders would
      often dust the locomotives with talc to kill the shine and glare,
      thus improving the detail of the photo.

      The boiler jacket is "Russian Iron". That's a whole book to explain…
      The jacket bands would most likely be polished brass, as would be
      many of the exposed fittings. The smoke box and stack are graphite
      and oil. That is exactly what it sounds like. It was applied while
      the engine was fired so it would heat cure and not rub off. Being as
      graphite is a form of carbon it was being used her as a form of
      corrosion inhibitor. Coal ash contains lye. The cab would be
      something like stained and heavily varnished oak, mahogany or some
      such hardwood. The tank has in what one publication described as a
      color called "Crimson Lake", a deep maroon like color. Lettering and
      detail painting has been described as gold leaf. Don't let anyone
      tell you there was any blue on these engines. At this time and up to
      the advent of coal-tar dyes, around the early 1900's, all true blue
      paint pigments were made of crushed lapis lazuli. At that time the
      stone was only known to exist in quantity in the mountains of
      Afghanistan. It required much hand processing and would have been
      cost prohibitive. The existence of blue paint on these engines is at
      the very best extremely doubtful.

      In practice, these dolled up steamers would not have stood up to the
      punishment of every day work and they didn't. These paint schemes
      didn't last very long at all. Page 107 of the same book, shows a
      more likely work-a-day paint scheme. Over all black with Russian
      Iron boiler, graphite and oil stack and smoke box with a polished
      brass number board and a varnished hardwood cab with brass fittings.
      Lettering is most likely Aluminum leaf, as most circles now believe.
      It would wear twice as long as white lead and not run with age.
      Still a very attractive paint scheme. Hope this helps. Happy
      painting!

      Dale Buxton
    • the_one_tuatha_ddana
      http://narrowgauge.org/images/tkcok/Special_m00241.jpg This is a very nice retouch of a period photo. The crispness of the colors though, give it away as a
      Message 2 of 18 , Jun 2, 2004
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        http://narrowgauge.org/images/tkcok/Special_m00241.jpg

        This is a very nice retouch of a period photo. The crispness of the
        colors though, give it away as a modern retouch. The dyes from the
        1870/80's for hand photo tinting fade badly with time. A print made
        over 125 years ago would not look this crisp even under the best of
        care and treatment. I looks to me to be a computer enhancement.
        There is something that looks like pixcelation in the right
        forground area. I once worked in a computer imaging area of a
        printing company. I saw this sort of pixcelating everyday. Looks as
        though the imager missed this on the final review. It's still a
        beautful photo!

        Dale Buxton
      • Kjb80401@aol.com
        In a message dated 6/2/04 12:34:13 AM Mountain Daylight Time, MEvans@slco.org writes:
        Message 3 of 18 , Jun 2, 2004
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          In a message dated 6/2/04 12:34:13 AM Mountain Daylight Time, MEvans@...
          writes:

          << I beg to differ - Take a look at this very early color image on the South
          Park - Webster Station - 1878 >>

          Mark,

          I'm familiar with this particular photo and the artist who colorized the
          sepia-tone original using Adobe Photoshop. If you check around the site where
          this photo is resident, you'll find the original sepia photo.

          Keevan
        • John Massura
          Thanks to all for the feedback! Yes, I did know about the many colors and the fancy scrollwork; one of the reasons I wanted this information. I ve found a
          Message 4 of 18 , Jun 2, 2004
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            Thanks to all for the feedback! Yes, I did know about the many colors
            and the fancy scrollwork; one of the reasons I wanted this information.
            I've found a sucker..oops friend who is willing to paint my engine. He
            wanted more information than my "many colors".

            Sincerely, John
          • Mark L. Evans
            Keevan Yes, I was just trying to pull Boone s leg a little :-) Mark
            Message 5 of 18 , Jun 2, 2004
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              Keevan

              Yes, I was just trying to pull Boone's leg a little :-)

              Mark

              >
              > I'm familiar with this particular photo and the artist who
              > colorized the
              > sepia-tone original using Adobe Photoshop. If you check
              > around the site where
              > this photo is resident, you'll find the original sepia photo.
              >
              > Keevan
              >
              >
            • C.Mutschler
              Actually, this is a colorized black and white photo. The original has been published before - it is black and white. Yes, there were some experimental color
              Message 6 of 18 , Jun 2, 2004
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                Actually, this is a colorized black and white photo. The
                original has been published before - it is black and white.
                Yes, there were some experimental color photographic processes
                by the early 1900's (I believe some color photos of Czar
                Nicholas II and his family were taken) but the practical color
                photographic process really came along as a cost-effective
                matter in the late 1930's. Kodachrome, as a commercial consumer
                product, dates to 1936.

                Charlie Mutschler
                -30-
                On Tuesday, June 1, 2004, at 11:33 PM, Mark L. Evans wrote:

                > Boone
                >
                > I beg to differ - Take a look at this very early color image on the
                > South Park - Webster Station - 1878
                >
                > http://narrowgauge.org/images/tkcok/Special_m00241.jpg
                >
                >
                > Mark
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Mike Conder
                mark, You should have posted this photo april 1st, not June 1st! Still, you caught a few. Mike Conder PS I ve always liked that photo in color ....
                Message 7 of 18 , Jun 2, 2004
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                  mark,

                  You should have posted this photo april 1st, not June 1st! Still, you caught a few.

                  Mike Conder

                  PS I've always liked that photo in color ....

                  "C.Mutschler" <rgs20@...> wrote:
                  Actually, this is a colorized black and white photo. ...

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                • john vivian
                  We all should be able to do that with PhotoShop. WOW, what a beautiful piece of work. Makes you wish Kodak had showed up 50 years earlier. JOHN V 8-) ...
                  Message 8 of 18 , Jun 2, 2004
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                    We all should be able to do that with PhotoShop. WOW,
                    what a beautiful piece of work. Makes you wish Kodak
                    had showed up 50 years earlier. JOHN V>8-)

                    --- Mike Conder <vulturenest1@...> wrote:
                    > mark,
                    >
                    > You should have posted this photo april 1st, not
                    > June 1st! Still, you caught a few.
                    >
                    > Mike Conder





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                  • lloyd
                    Here is a link to the color scheme resources from the large scalers http://www.frontiernet.net/~scottychaos/ON_LINE/ Lloyd Lehrer, irreverent loyal member of
                    Message 9 of 18 , Jun 3, 2004
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                      Here is a link to the color scheme resources from the large scalers

                      http://www.frontiernet.net/~scottychaos/ON_LINE/

                      Lloyd Lehrer, irreverent loyal member of 4L (Loyal Legion of Logged on
                      Loggers), IBCS (Int'l Brotherhood of Cabbage Stackers), NMRA and Los
                      Angeles Model Railroad Society (LAMRS; www.lamrs.org)



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                    • Payne,Brett
                      Guys, Colour photo s could have been taken in Colorado as early as the 1870 s the colours resulting might not be normal to our eyes today - but it could have
                      Message 10 of 18 , Jun 3, 2004
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                        Guys,
                        Colour photo's could have been taken in Colorado as early as the 1870's the colours resulting might not be normal to our eyes today - but it could have happened.

                        From http://www.rleggat.com/photohistory/history/colour.htm

                        Though the invention of photography had an immediate impact on the whole art world, the early photographs were in monochrome. As an additional service, daguerreotypes could be hand- painted, which kept a number of painters of miniatures in business. However, it was to be some time before colour photography was to become a reality.

                        In the 1860s James Clerk Maxwell, using as a subject a tartan ribbon, showed that three monochrome images could be formed of a subject, each one taken using a different colour filter (red, blue and green). By projecting these images using three lanterns, each equipped with a corresponding filter, the colours could be recreated.

                        The results were somewhat disappointing to Maxwell and his collaborator Thomas Sutton, but nevertheless they deserve the credit for laying the foundations of trichromate colour photography.

                        Interestingly, strictly speaking this experiment should never have worked! Maxwell did not know this, but at that time the emulsion in use only responded to light at the blue end of the spectrum. So how could anything have been recorded on the "red" and "green" slides? It was not until one hundred years later that when the experiment was repeated, it was discovered that the green filter had also passed some blue light, whilst the ribbon's red colours were also reflecting ultra-violet rays, which had been recorded on the red plate. However, though this (by sheer coincidence) produced the right effect, it does not detract from Maxwell's discovery, for with an appropriate emulsion responding to all colours the method works well.

                        In 1873 Herman Vogel discovered sensitising dyes, which was a step forward in the pursuit of full colour photography. As a result of his work, "orthochromatic" plates, sensitive to all colours with the exception of red, were produced.

                        When in 1906 "panchromatic" films, sensitive to all colours, came into production, some photographers began taking three "separation" negatives, using a viewer which enabled one to see all three slides superimposed upon one another.

                        In 1907 Auguste and Louis Lumière produced plates they called Autochrome, using a different system from that above. The colours appeared in delicate pastel shades, often looking very dark, but were well received at the time.

                        Back in 1869 Ducas du Hauron had published a book offering another method - the subtractive one - by which colour could be re-created. One of his suggestions had been that instead of mixing colour lights, one could combine dyed images; film could be coated with three very thin layers of emulsion, each sensitive to the primary colours; once processed as positives, the transparency could then be viewed as a full colour photograph. At the time, however, the emulsions were such that none of his proposals could be tested. It was not until the mid 1930s that Kodak was to produce a film based on this principle, to be named Kodachrome; up till then the additive methods suggested by Maxwell had been used.

                        © Robert Leggat, 1999.
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