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Re: [HOn3] foam glue?

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  • Mike Lehman
    Mike, I ve used Formica #160 water-based adhesive to glue cork roadbed to plywood. I just put down some roadbed using a can of #160 that was at least four
    Message 1 of 18 , Dec 31, 2003
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      Mike,
      I've used Formica #160 water-based adhesive to glue cork roadbed to
      plywood. I just put down some roadbed using a can of #160 that was at
      least four years old -- I'm uncertain if it had been previously opened,
      but it worked fine.

      I can see no problem with using it with sheet foam, except that it is a
      contact cement. As long as you can put it where you want it -- in one
      try -- it should work. Sometimes when building scenery, I like to move
      things around a bit, which is the only time when #160 might not work the
      way I'd like it.

      On the other hand, it you used one of the tubed foam-safe adhesives and
      you have wide pieces of foam to bond, it can take weeks, literally, for
      it to set up enough to cut and shape it without shifting. This is a case
      where I can see Formica #160 working better by instantly bonding.

      Note that I haven't tried #160 yet on foam, but I probably will in the
      near future.
      Mike Lehman
      Urbana, IL

      MJ wrote:

      > Has anyone tried the blue-green 'water' based contact cement with
      > any success?
      > Mike
    • szczowicz
      ... case ... Mike I ve always understood that an adhesive bonds when the solvent has evaporated. Foam is non porous so it might still take a while for the
      Message 2 of 18 , Jan 1, 2004
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        > if you used one of the tubed foam-safe adhesives and
        > you have wide pieces of foam to bond, it can take weeks, literally, for
        > it to set up enough to cut and shape it without shifting. This is a
        case
        > where I can see Formica #160 working better by instantly bonding.

        Mike

        I've always understood that an adhesive bonds when the solvent has
        evaporated. Foam is non porous so it might still take a while for the
        water in the 160 to find its way out through the edges and allow a
        bond especially in the middle of a large sheet.
        I wonder whether the most successful adhesive for bonding large pieces
        of foam are those which rely on a chemical reaction rather than
        evaporation of the solvent.
        Mark
      • MJ
        The advantage I see with the water based [blue-gren] contact cement is that after coating both pieces to be bonded one lets the solvent evaporate before
        Message 3 of 18 , Jan 1, 2004
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          The advantage I see with the water based [blue-gren] contact cement
          is that after coating both pieces to be bonded one lets the solvent
          evaporate before bonding the two adhesive coated pieces with
          pressure. I believe this would be the best method for large pieces
          of foam. I don't know what "formica 160" is, are we talking about
          the same material? mike
        • Mike Lehman
          Mark, I think the big difference is how the solvent, whatever it is in the two products, evaporates. With the tube foam board adhesive, you get a much thicker
          Message 4 of 18 , Jan 1, 2004
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            Mark,
            I think the big difference is how the solvent, whatever it is in the two
            products, evaporates. With the tube foam board adhesive, you get a much
            thicker product that evaporates mostly after the pieces are joined. With
            the contact cement, most of the evaporation occurs before the pieces are
            joined. And once they are joined, it going to take much longer for the
            remaining solvent/moisture of tube adhesive to work its way out from
            between the sheets than it is for the rather limited remaining
            solvent/moisture from the contact type adhesive.
            Mike Lehman
            Urbana, IL

            Mike Lehman wrote:
            >>if you used one of the tubed foam-safe adhesives and
            >>you have wide pieces of foam to bond, it can take weeks, literally, for
            >>it to set up enough to cut and shape it without shifting. This is a
            >
            > case
            >
            >>where I can see Formica #160 working better by instantly bonding.
            >
            szczowicz wrote:
            > Mike
            >
            > I've always understood that an adhesive bonds when the solvent has
            > evaporated. Foam is non porous so it might still take a while for the
            > water in the 160 to find its way out through the edges and allow a
            > bond especially in the middle of a large sheet.
            > I wonder whether the most successful adhesive for bonding large pieces
            > of foam are those which rely on a chemical reaction rather than
            > evaporation of the solvent.
            > Mark
          • szczowicz
            Mike, I agree but one of the main considerations is that most of the specialist solvents anticipate gluing the sheets together end to end rather than one on
            Message 5 of 18 , Jan 1, 2004
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              Mike,
              I agree but one of the main considerations is that most of the
              specialist solvents anticipate gluing the sheets together end to end
              rather than one on top of the other - this is building material and
              not made for the RR modeller. But I'll be interested how you fare when
              you try your glue out. I have to say that using my 'glue for all
              seasons', latex, was still soft after many days - ie it failed. So i
              went back to my wire mesh and plaster favorite and will avoid foam for
              the time being - messy stuff anyway
              Best wishes,
              Mark
            • Mike Lehman
              Mike, Formica #160 is, indeed, a sort of blue-green (turquoise?) water-based contact cement. My guess is that we are talking about the same thing. Mike Lehman
              Message 6 of 18 , Jan 1, 2004
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                Mike,
                Formica #160 is, indeed, a sort of blue-green (turquoise?) water-based
                contact cement. My guess is that we are talking about the same thing.
                Mike Lehman
                Urbana, IL

                MJ wrote:

                > The advantage I see with the water based [blue-gren] contact cement
                > is that after coating both pieces to be bonded one lets the solvent
                > evaporate before bonding the two adhesive coated pieces with
                > pressure. I believe this would be the best method for large pieces
                > of foam. I don't know what "formica 160" is, are we talking about
                > the same material? mike
              • MJ
                Thanks Mike, products often have different names up here in Canukland. mike
                Message 7 of 18 , Jan 2, 2004
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                  Thanks Mike,
                  products often have different names up here in Canukland.
                  mike

                  > Mike,
                  > Formica #160 is, indeed, a sort of blue-green (turquoise?)
                  > water-based
                  > contact cement. My guess is that we are talking about the same
                  > thing.
                  > Mike Lehman
                • Payne,Brett
                  Mike, For liquidnails you can assume this applies to any Wash Up with Water contact adhesive. I know there are multiple brands. Also there are alternates
                  Message 8 of 18 , Jan 4, 2004
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                    Mike,
                    For "liquidnails" you can assume this applies to any "Wash Up with Water" contact adhesive. I know there are multiple brands.

                    Also there are alternates available at the craft stores that are similar to white glues that are designed to glue dissimilar materials including foam. The one I use is called a tacky glue. I find this sort of glue a lot more user friendly than Liquidnails.

                    Brett Payne

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Larry Smith [mailto:wooddale@...]
                    Sent: Thursday, 1 January 2004 4:42 AM

                    Mike
                    Liquidnails makes a product that is used for gluing extruded foam. It
                    can also be used to glue the foam to wood. Out club has used it an it
                    works quite well.
                    Larry Smith

                    MJ wrote:
                    > What are you finding is the best glue for joining extruded
                    > styrofoam, i.e. blueboard, to itself or wood?
                    >
                    > mike
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