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RE: [HOn3] HOn3 Brass Locomotive upgrade-painters

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  • Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton
    ~One Caboose recommended guy quoted me a price of $250 for a basic no frills ~paint job. That sounded high. It s not an unreasonable figure for painting a
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 1, 2002
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      ~One Caboose recommended guy quoted me a price of $250 for a basic no
      frills
      ~paint job. That sounded high.

      It's not an unreasonable figure for painting a steam loco. Remember that
      the model has to be disassembled, stripped, cleaned, prepared, primed,
      painted and reassembled. Depending on the model that could easily be 15
      hours or more for a top class paint job - turn that into an hourly rate
      and it would a lot less than your car mechanic gets.

      There are people who will do it cheaper, but generally you get what you
      pay for.

      Aidrian



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    • Mike Bauers
      ... That is in the ball park, so to speak. It s the couple of hours of decaling that adds to the few hours of paint curing, making a simple paint job nearly a
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 1, 2002
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        CARL BARNA wrote:
        > One Caboose recommended guy quoted me a price of $250 for a basic no
        > frills paint job. That sounded high. ----- Original Message -----

        That is in the ball park, so to speak.

        It's the couple of hours of decaling that adds to the few hours of paint
        curing, making a simple paint job nearly a one day project.

        It's also a job that most anyone could do over a couple of evenings.

        You either pay yourself or someone else...... The someone else will
        always be more expensive.

        There are many ways to carefully strip a model for painting, Careful use
        of ordinary spray cans can give a beautifully primed and then finish
        painted steam engine model.

        The secret is to carefully strip the model and not lose any parts.

        I like to make a simple block diagram of boiler, wheels, tender on a
        sheet of printer paper; and tape the screws to the diagram about where
        they came off the model. Then it's just making certain the model is
        clean and using only light coats of paints in several passes with pauses
        between passes so that you don't get the model too wet and cause runs in
        the paint.

        That is what you do with either spray cans or air brushes.

        After a couple of days of the paint curing, it's ready to decal.

        The big secret is to get all the instructions for the paints and decals
        and read them before you start to do the job.

        Try a simple spray job on a swap meet type mass market steam engine and
        you will be absolutely amazed how easy it can be and how great the final
        result will be.

        By the way...... those coatings you find on brass models can be left on
        as a sort of preliminary primer. It's already well bonded to the model
        and doesn't need to be removed to properly paint the model.

        Need to remove a bad paint job on a used model? Use the lye based
        Easy-off oven cleaner. It will strip the model in about 10 minutes and
        can be repeated if needed. That and a stiff brush under a water tap will
        prep the worst painted model for a better paint job once completely
        dried a couple of hours or so later.

        --
        regards,
        Mike Bauers
        Milwaukee, Wi, USA
      • Mike Bauers
        ... I use almost every make of paint. My favorite is Scalecoat. Goes on micro-thin and gloss, perfect for applying decals and I prefer a gloss paint under the
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 1, 2002
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          MJ wrote:
          > Mike,
          >
          > Thanks for the painting tips.
          >
          > What kind of paint do you use for your loco's and rolling stock?

          I use almost every make of paint. My favorite is Scalecoat. Goes on
          micro-thin and gloss, perfect for applying decals and I prefer a gloss
          paint under the weathering. That makes a weathered unit look like it was
          shop painted at one time instead of abandoned for decades. The
          weathering ages it by months or years, depending upon my whim, or idea
          of just how long I want it to look like it has been around.

          > Can you suggest a brand of paint that would replicate the '40s US Army O.D. ?
          > I'm planning to overpaint the cars and loco's just like the Army did.
          > Acrylics would be a lot easier to work with if they're applicable.

          Yes, there are several makes of really nice Acrylics in military colors.
          I just gathered some fliers for the Model Master paint line. They have a
          large selection of RR usable, normal, and military specific colors in
          both enamel and acryls. You'd really like the range of the acryls and
          the enamel range includes several metalizer colors that are in enough of
          a range of colors that you can make a fine range of graghited steamer
          smoke and fire boxes straight from the bottle or with a little blending
          to age the look.

          Seek about and nail down the FS standard colors you might want for the
          Army engines, the acryl line is mixed to those. Just the perfect color
          may be there for you.

          >
          > Someone must make appropriate decals to match the "USA" the Army used on
          > the loco tenders. The engine numbers should be simple too. Would Letraset
          > dry transfer work?

          Scale.......... What's that big line of decals ??? They make a bunch of
          military sets as well as hundreds of RR sets.........

          Oh yeh, Microscale ! They have had their product list on The Web. They
          may have just what you need again.

          If not....... White lettering?

          An easy job for a hobbyist with an Alps printer. Ask about on the lists
          and you'll find at least one fellow that can make just what you need on
          standard wet transfer decal paper.

          Get back to me in about two weeks, (after I'm through the hardware and
          OS up grades on my G4 I just started) and if you still need the
          lettering, I can pop it out from the thousands of fonts and the super
          program I've got for altering close fonts to be the right fonts,
          Denaba's Canvas graphic 'suite'. I only need a fairly flat on image of
          the lettering to make the match and conversion, then its just a matter
          of save the custom settings, and what sizes and what text to print.

          --
          regards,
          Mike Bauers
          Milwaukee, Wi, USA
        • MJ
          Mike, Thanks for the painting tips. What kind of paint do you use for your loco s and rolling stock? Can you suggest a brand of paint that would replicate the
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 1, 2002
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            Mike,

            Thanks for the painting tips.

            What kind of paint do you use for your loco's and rolling stock?
            Can you suggest a brand of paint that would replicate the '40s US Army O.D. ?
            I'm planning to overpaint the cars and loco's just like the Army did.
            Acrylics would be a lot easier to work with if they're applicable.

            Someone must make appropriate decals to match the "USA" the Army used on
            the loco tenders. The engine numbers should be simple too. Would Letraset
            dry transfer work?

            Mike
            WP&YR mp 100



            At 06:06 01/10/02 -0500, you wrote:
            >
            >It's the couple of hours of decaling that adds to the few hours of paint
            >curing, making a simple paint job nearly a one day project.
            >--
            >regards,
            >Mike Bauers
            >Milwaukee, Wi, USA
          • HOn3MRR@aol.com
            In a message dated 10/1/02 2:42:50 AM Central Daylight Time, ... Hi All......... I have to agree with this, AND you also can factor in the cost airbrush,
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 2, 2002
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              In a message dated 10/1/02 2:42:50 AM Central Daylight Time,
              aidrian.bridgeman-sutton@... writes:


              > It's not an unreasonable figure for painting a steam loco.

              Hi All.........

              I have to agree with this, AND you also can factor in the cost airbrush,
              compressor, paint booth, paint, shop supplies plus the electricty, if you are
              contemplating doing the job yourself!

              Adrians second coment is also very true........Ya want cheap go down to Home
              Depot and buy a can of the flat black BBQ paint, put your $1000 model on a
              card board box on the picnic table in the back yard on Sat afternoon and have
              at it.....Don't worry you can clean off those flying dirt and dust globs,
              when you get out your pocket knife and scrape the paint off of the tires for
              good electrical contact!

              Bill Martin
              San Antonio, Texas
              Presque Isle Northern RR


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