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Re: [HOn3] Re: Assam-Bengal

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  • RoundBell@aol.com
    In a message dated 1/4/02 10:17:39 PM Central Standard Time, rick@urbaneagle.com writes: (3) Annual rainfall on the order of 100-120 .... What do they call
    Message 1 of 26 , Jan 4, 2002
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      In a message dated 1/4/02 10:17:39 PM Central Standard Time,
      rick@... writes:

      << >(3) Annual rainfall on the order of 100-120'....

      What do they call this place, Atlantis? :o}

      Rick
      >>
      Now you know the definition of MONSOON. Loco Doc
    • Anne Ogborn
      ... Bengal is the ethnic region where the lower part of my prototype (DHR) is, although technically the railroad is in Sikkim. The whole area is on the edge of
      Message 2 of 26 , Jan 5, 2002
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        > Rick
        > >>
        > Now you know the definition of MONSOON. Loco Doc

        Bengal is the ethnic region where the lower part of my prototype (DHR) is,
        although technically the railroad is in Sikkim.

        The whole area is on the edge of Bangladesh. Bangladesh basicly IS the delta
        of the bhramaputra river. On the west the rain forest slowly changes to plains, but on the east
        it becomes the upper Burma (or Myanmar, if you prefer) rain forests.

        Because there are no bridges across the Bhramaputra the Bangladesh Rlys are
        split in two. On the west the gauge is 5'-6", on the right it's 1 meter.
        So half the entire country is narrow gauge only!

        For political reasons, not to mention that there's nothing there, there's no
        railway into Burma. The 'River Kwai' railway used to run up this direction, but
        it's no longer operating in that area.
        This break, incidentally, is one of several that prevent the 'grand tour' -
        in theory one could get on a train in the UK and get as far as SE Asia.
        In practice there are several politically caused gaps in the line
        Iraq-Pakistan
        (currently) Pakistan-India
        India-Myanmar.

        Annie
      • Anne Ogborn
        oops - My Burmese geography is failing me. The River Kwai railway is a tad to the south. THe no longer operating railway in this area is the one the allies
        Message 3 of 26 , Jan 5, 2002
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          oops -
          My Burmese geography is failing me. The 'River Kwai' railway is
          a tad to the south. THe no longer operating railway in this area
          is the one the allies built during WWII.

          --
          Anne Ogborn

          Need motors? HOn30? Try Annie's Depot -
          http://www.idiom.com/~anniepoo/depot/index.html
        • HICJHH@aol.com
          I am a member of the australian group. If interested I can look up, when i can find it, the mailing info etc. They put out a irregular, or at least I get it
          Message 4 of 26 , Jan 5, 2002
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            I am a member of the australian group. If interested I can look up, when i
            can find it, the mailing info etc. They put out a irregular, or at least I
            get it irregularly, newsletter. Happy to photocopy & mail you a copy, if you
            want it.
          • John Stutz
            My apologies. In checking back to the references I find that actual rainfall in the Chochi Hills only runs to 10-20 per year, not the 100-120 figure I gave.
            Message 5 of 26 , Jan 7, 2002
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              My apologies.

              In checking back to the references I find that actual rainfall in the Chochi
              Hills only runs to 10-20' per year, not the 100-120' figure I gave. Short
              term recorded figures are still remarkably high, with (subject to memory
              failure) up to 3" in 20 minutes, and 12" in 24 hours. These hills run to about
              4-5000' maximum elevation, with the railroad summit something over 2000'.
              Grades ran about 2.5% on the south approach to the main summit, 1.4%
              elsewhere.

              The railway ran from the port of Chittagong on the Bay of Bengal, north to
              Lumdung Junction on the main east-west line. Construction dates were about
              1893-1904. The road was closed for some years following an unusually heavy
              monsoon in 1915(?), and abandonment was seriously considered at that time. It
              probably was a borderline proposition even then, while it still had the
              backing of Imperial resources. Not surprising that it has since been closed.

              John Stutz

              >
              > In a message dated 1/4/02 10:17:39 PM Central Standard Time,
              > rick@... writes:
              >
              > << >(3) Annual rainfall on the order of 100-120'....
              >
              > What do they call this place, Atlantis? :o}
              >
              > Rick
              > >>
              > Now you know the definition of MONSOON. Loco Doc
            • HICJHH@aol.com
              Annie, do you have the book Railway in the Clouds ? It is about the Darjeeling Railway, which if I read your message right is what you are modeling. If so,
              Message 6 of 26 , Feb 1, 2002
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                Annie, do you have the book "Railway in the Clouds"? It is about the
                Darjeeling Railway, which if I read your message right is what you are
                modeling. If so, do you know where I can get a copy?? Also, there is a
                Darjeeling group out of Australia. Look up on web "Darjeeling Railroad".
              • Anne Ogborn
                ... No, I don t have that book. Reportedly the best book on the subject (I also don t have it) is by Terry Martin, Halfway to Heaven I m well aware of the
                Message 7 of 26 , Feb 5, 2002
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                  HICJHH@... wrote:
                  >
                  > Annie, do you have the book "Railway in the Clouds"? It is about the
                  > Darjeeling Railway, which if I read your message right is what you are
                  > modeling. If so, do you know where I can get a copy?? Also, there is a
                  > Darjeeling group out of Australia. Look up on web "Darjeeling Railroad".

                  No, I don't have that book. Reportedly the best book on the subject
                  (I also don't have it) is by Terry Martin, 'Halfway to Heaven'

                  I'm well aware of the Australian DHRS.

                  --
                  Anne Ogborn

                  Need motors? HOn30? Try Annie's Depot -
                  http://www.idiom.com/~anniepoo/depot/index.html
                • John Stutz
                  ... It is a prototype, actually a practical engineering, thing: How are you going to keep your retaining walls from overturning? You cannot drive piling into
                  Message 8 of 26 , Mar 28, 2006
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                    > John,
                    > A friend of mine, Steve Harris, sent me a message where
                    > you made some great points about portals. I think I heard
                    > your clinic at Santa Clara?? The one point of interest to
                    > me was " make sure you do not put any sort of retaining
                    > walls above the portal". I am building a backwoods down
                    > and dirty On30 logging and mining railroad and I am deeply
                    > engrossed in constructing 11 portals. I am converting my
                    > old HO layout so the old scenery is still there. When I
                    > expand the hole to accept the new O scale portal I am
                    > finding a need to hold up parts of the mountain, so a
                    > retaining wall seems like the obvious thing to do. Are you
                    > making this comment about retaing walls because you are
                    > sticking to pure prototype standards or am I missing
                    > something. If I don't put up these retaining walls the
                    > mountain will end up on my track!!!

                    It is a prototype, actually a practical engineering, thing:
                    How are you going to keep your retaining walls from
                    overturning? You cannot drive piling into the tunnel to
                    hold them up. A gravity wall, be it masonry or rock filled
                    timber crib, needs a base width of at lest a third of its
                    height, more like 1/2 when supporting an extended slope.
                    Where are you going to get this width? If you have rock
                    strong enough that you can anchor tie rods back into it, it
                    probably does not need a retaining wall. The practical
                    solution, when building with timber, is to extend the lining
                    out to the edge of the slope's natural runout at the tunnel
                    roof level. The same is often done with masonry.

                    What I usually find in actual timbered tunnels is that the
                    arched tunnel lining proper ends where the arch is no longer
                    supported by solid unexcavated earth. From there a knee
                    braced post and beam framed portal is carried out as far as
                    the engineers expect the roof to support a permanent
                    backfill. Often this ends up with a low headwall of 2-4
                    layers of old tunnel timbers where the permanent slope was
                    misjudged. Excavated ground alongside of the portal is
                    filled in with rock filled timber cribbing to prevent
                    accumulated loose material crushing in the portal from the
                    side. Usually this is lined on the inner face with planking
                    to prevent cinders lodging, and sloped on the outer face to
                    match the portal braces, so it may look like the portal
                    braces support a side wall. Modelers often miss this
                    detail. Alternately, in firm rock cuttings the roof is
                    often extended to the slope of the cutting. Some roads
                    omitted the separate portal, and carried the arch out into
                    the open, bracing it with timber cribbing on either side and
                    up to the arch's crown.

                    In instances where the road expects loose rocks to continue
                    rolling off the slope, they may extend the portal with a
                    simple post and beam rock shed, basicly a heavy snow shed
                    with level roof. The Camas Prairie made extensive use of rock
                    sheds, even with concrete portals, as did the Milwaukee in
                    their crossing of the Bitterroots in Idaho.

                    In heavy snow country there is often a light weight snow
                    drift shed extention to the portal, just to prevent drifting
                    in of the approach cuts. These are often applied to
                    concrete portals. Drift snown sheds usually have level or
                    shallow peaked roofs and are covered with 2" or 3" planks,
                    while slide snow sheds will use 4" to 6" material, and have
                    roofs sloped at near the natural slope angle.

                    John
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